The Mark of The Beast

Definition of the Plague, Mark, Beast, Sorcery, Instrumental Music in the Holy Places.

The.Mark.of.The.BeastA.gif

The.Mark.of.The.Beast.B.gifTHE BEAST
THE MOTHER OF HA
LOTS RIDES TO USE SORCERY TO TAKE AWAY YOUR INHERITANCE.
I will try to place this in order. Jesus said that truth had been hidden in parables from the foundation of the World. This was to prevent false prophets from pretending that "a" spirit spoke to them in addition to the God-chosen apostles and prophets.
They are created now, and not from the beginning;
        even before the day when thou heardest them not;
        lest thou shouldest say, Behold, I knew them. Isaiah 48:7

    Yea, thou heardest not; yea, thou knewest not;
    yea, from that time that thine ear was not opened:
    for I knew that thou wouldest deal very treacherously,
    and wast called a transgressor from the womb. Isaiah 48:8

The purpose of the Scriptural record is most often to REPUDIATE the world's religions.  That most often depended on worship of the gods by sacrificing animals to appease or even threaten the gods. "Praise Singers" or Encomiansts are the world's oldest profession. By chanting, beating on metal or plucking on strings they pretended or believed that the sounds could cause the paying customer to hear the voice of a god.  H. Bamford Parks says that the emotionally or sexually abnormal were believed to be the best priests.

Beasts were also the massed multitudes necessary to convince the doubters that the great demonstration for the  SEEKERS caused them to gamble away their kingdoms. Hitler called such people "human material" to be used and disposed of.

Scripture defines the people who use and abuse God's people as "beasts" and connects that to forcing "a new style of music or drama" where the Satyric drama was popular.

The Jewish and other systems were "covenants with death and hell" and they pretended that no evil could touch them.  God in Christ ordained the qahal, synagogue, ekklesia or Church in the wilderness to quarantine the godly people from the Civil-Military-Clergy called robbers and parasites in the prophets.

A Church of Christ is narrowly defined as worship IN THE SPIRIT as opposed to worship IN THE FLESH. Paul says that this excludes the concision and dogs. These were the emasculated priests of the Mother Goddess.

First: The command is to assemble to teach the Word of God: A disciple goes to Bible School and not to engage in ceremonial legalism.
Second: the command is to "speak that which is written for our learning. SPEAK as related to LOGOS is defined to exclude rhetoric, poetry or music. God does not need and will not tolerate aids and aiders.

  1. God rescued Israel from Captivity by pure grace: because he promised it. His justice would have left them to self destruct because He says they were WORSE than the nations.
  2. God gave them The Book of The Covenant of Grace: the Abrahamic covenant made by God IN Christ.
  3. They refused to listen to God and demanded a mediator (that clergy folly)
  4. Israel rebuked God by rising up to "play" which was instrumental worship of the Egyptian (etal) trinity under the image of Apis the bull calf.  "The pantheon included bull, cow and calf divinities . "Young braided girls, dressed in short skirts with bands crossed over their breasts, are shown performing sacred songs and dances for Hathor [female cow] who are accompanied by women muscians, playing flutes or clapping their hands in rhythm. Over the dancers and musicians in the lower register is a powerful invocation to the starry snake goddess of the night, Hathor "Gold," whom they call on to rise and be propitiated though the dances they perform in her honor.


    Real men cannot be induced: we had to wait for David before female roles were performed by male Levites but only after they had been turned over to worship the starry host: COSMIC WORSHIP.

  5. The golden calf represented real bull calves worshiped musically in Egypt. Probably a Babylonian connection to SUN worship to which God abandoned Israel because of musical idolatry.
    1. The Spirit OF Christ affirms that God never commanded such sacrifices and proves that the Mount Sinai musical idolatry was without redemption.



      Acts 7:41 And they made a calf in those days, 
              and offered sacrifice unto the idol, 
              and rejoiced in the works of their own hands.

      Euphrainō
      , Ep. euphr-, fut. Att.155.12, Pi.I.7(6).3   II. Pass., make merry, enjoy oneself,
      i. mēkhanēn, [sound, lights ] in the theatre,
      4. take up and bear, as a burden, “moron” A.Pers.547; “athlon” S.Tr.80; “algos” A.R.4.65.
      2. raise by words, hence, praise, extol, E.Heracl.322, etc.; ai. logō to exaggerate, D.21.71.
      mēkha^n-ē   3. theatrical machine by which gods, etc., were made to appear in the air “sophistōn m.” Pl.Lg.908d:
      Musical instruments are "machines for doing hard work mostly making war."

      The STAR god to whom God abandoned Israel included Apollo, Abaddon or Apollyon. The SERVICE to the star gods was Abadown and the Levites prophesied with instruments meaning they were soothsayers often interchangeable with sorcerers.

      Pind. I. 1 Yield, island of Apollo; indeed, with the help of the gods I shall accomplish the end of both graceful songs, honoring in the dance both Phoebus with the unshorn hair, in wave-washed Ceos with its mariners, and the sea-dividing reef of the Isthmus. [10] Since the Isthmus gave to the people of Cadmus six garlands from her games, the glory of triumph for my fatherland, Yield, island of Apollo; indeed, with the help of the gods I shall accomplish the end of both graceful songs, honoring in the dance both Phoebus with the unshorn hair, in wave-washed Ceos with its mariners, and the sea-dividing reef of the Isthmus. [10] Since the Isthmus gave to the people of Cadmus six garlands from her games, the glory of triumph for my fatherland,

      Plat. Laws 908d and from it, too, there spring sometimes tyrants and demagogues and generals, and those who plot by means of peculiar mystic rites of their own, and the devices of those who are called “sophists.” Of these there may be many kinds;
         sophis-tēs , ou, ho,
      A. master of one's craft, adept, expert, of diviners, Hdt.2.49; of poets, “meletan sophistais prosbalon” Pi.I.5(4).28, cf. Cratin.2; of musicians, “sophistēs . . parapaiōn khelun” A.Fr.314, cf. Eup.447, Pl.Com. 140; sophistē Thrēki [IMPURE religion] with modal words added, “hoi s. tōn hierōn melōn” {melody in the holy places}
      3. later of the rhētores, Professors of Rhetoric, and prose writers of the Empire, such as Philostratus and Libanius, Suid.; “Apollōnidē sophistē”
      plek-ō plots 2. of Poets, p. humnon, rhēmata, Pi.O.6.86, N.4.94; “ōdas”


  6. Moses broke the tablets which were preambles to The Book of The Covenant of Grace. They are never restated in the same form.
  7. He gave them The Book of The Law to regulate the lawless.
  8. He sentenced them to return beyond Babylon for captivity and death.
  9. The Levites executed 3,000 of the idolaters and God commanded that they stand in ranks and execute any godly person who came near any of the horrors of the now-Egyptian, Greece, Canaanite and Babylon worship of the starry host: the COSMIC worship the false agents are trying to restore.
  10. Because of this fall from Grace Moses wrote an inverted verson of the Babylonian Clay Tablets maybe 1,000 years old when Abraham was born.
  11. The story in the Torah defines the Naga, Nachash or serpent worship imported from the east to which God scattered them.
  12. This beginning-time worship of the musical enchanters is to be restored in the end time worship of the BEAST or SERPENT which the pagans called into their presece the whispering and ringing noise of musical instruments. The Serpent is connected to "bell metal which rings when struck."  It was used by the Babylonians and in the Jubal story of the wind, string and percussion noises. The Spirit OF Christ defined this as the marks of God driving His enemies into "hell."

    "Glueck explained the associations of the three major meanings of nachash as follows: The production of copper was seen in the Bronze Age as conferring magical powers on the smelter. When the smelted copper, or molten brass or bronze, was poured out into the sand, it would form a long, sinuous ingot of metal—the brazen snake or serpent that became the symbol of his magic.
           
    5175.  nachash, naw-khawsh΄; from 5172; a snake (from its hiss):—serpent.
            5153.  nachuwsh, naw-khoosh΄; apparently passive participle of 5172 (perhaps in the sense of ringing,
            i.e. bell-metal; or from the red color of the throat of a serpent (5175, as denominative) when hissing);
           coppery, i.e. (figuratively) hard:—of brass.
    Gen. 3:14 And the LORD God said unto the serpent, Because thou hast done this,
            thou art cursed above all cattle, and above every beast of the field;
            upon thy belly [emotions] shalt thou go,
            and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life:
    Genesis 3:15 And I will put enmity between thee and the woman,
            and between thy seed and her seed;
            it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.     

    When Nahash (the name must be an Israelite caricature: it means “snake”), the king of the Ammonites, agreed to spare the Israelites of Jabesh-Gilead only if the Israelites allowed Nahash to gouge out the right eye of every man by the soon-to-be king of the Israelites,

    King Nachash was no snake. He was, perhaps, a smelter of copper (or an importer of copper from the lands to the south of Ammon), perhaps a soothsayer or diviner, perhaps simply a smart man.

  13. It was not only in Judah, Israel, Ammon, Moab and Edom that copper and its serpentine associations were assumed to have magical powers. The Greek caduceus with its two brazen serpents was the symbol of Mercury’s power, and later of the medical profession. In rabbinic Hebrew, Nachushtan is the serpent of brass that Moses (and Aaron) used to impress Pharaoh’s sorcerers (who had, apparently, learned similar magic from the coppersmiths); in modern Hebrew, nachushtan means caduceus.

  14. This began to be restored after the Great American Awakenings by merchants going church to church selling the now brass-enabled reed organ and this led to other instruments "to make the lambs dumb before the slaughter."

Moreover the multitude of thy strangers shall be like small dust,
and the multitude of the terrible ones shall be as chaff that passeth away:
yea, it shall be at an instant suddenly. Isa 29:5

Thou shalt be visited of the Lord of hosts [Israel worshipped the HOST]
        with thunder, and with earthquake,
        and great noise, with storm and tempest,
        and the flame of devouring fire. Isa 29:6

Wherefore the Lord said,
        Forasmuch as this people draw near me with their mouth,
        and with their lips do honour me,
        but have removed their heart far from me,
        and their fear toward me is taught by the precept of men: Isa 29:13 Genesis 3:1
SO DON'T TRY TO DO COSMIC WORSHIP
"It is remarkable that the verb nachash always means to enchant, fascinate, bewitch; or of one having and using occult knowledge. See Gen. 30:27; 44:5, 15. Lev. 19:26. Deut. 18:10. 1Kings 20:33. 2Kings 17:17; 21:6. 2Chron. 33:6. So also is the noun used in Num. 23:23; 24:1."
PAUL KNEW ALL ABOUT EVE

EVE
is Moses' effort to warn the Israelites abandoned to return to "beyond Babylon."  We know that Eve is mentioned only twice in the New Testament: both times to warn the readers of the ancient-and modern despisers of the Word of Truth.
 
First, students as wise as Paul would understand that as Jesus said TRUTH had been hidden in parables from the foundation of the world. That was to fool the Scribes and Pharisees. Jesus called them HYPOCRITES by quoting Isaiah an Ezekiel: hypocrites are self-preachers, singers and instrument players. The musical instruments are the common MARK that 'we will not listen to the Word of God."
The serpents, however, of the magicians-(that is,) the gods of destruction-withstood the power of Moses in Egypt, but the rod of Moses reduced them all to subjection and slew them. This universal serpent is, he says, the wise discourse of Eve. This, he says, is the mystery of Edem, this the river of Edem;
this the mark that was set upon Cain,
that any one who findeth him might not kill him. This, he says, is Cain, [Gen. iv. 15] whose sacrifice [Gen. iv. 5. ] the god of this world did not accept.
Theophilus to Autolycus 

This Eve, on account of her having been in the beginning deceived by the serpent, and become the author of sin, the wicked demon, who also is called Satan, who then spoke to her through the serpent, and who works even to this day in those men that are possessed by him, invokes as Eve.58 And he is called "demon" and "dragon," on account of his revolting from God. For at first he was an angel. And concerning his history there is a great deal to be said; wherefore I at present omit the relation of it, for I have also given an account of him in another place.

58 Referring to the bacchanalian orgies in which " Eva " was shouted, and which the Fathers professed to believe was an unintentional invocation of Eve, the authoress of all sin.

The word "abomination" is also key to understanding the context. In Hebrew, the word "to 'evah," (abomination) is almost invariably linked to idolatry. In the passages from which both verses are taken, God tells Moses to tell the people not to follow the idolatrous practices of the people around them, people who sacrificed their children to Molech, or who masturbated into the fire to offer their semen to Molech, for example. Chapter 20 starts off with the same warning.

Leviticus 20:2 Again, thou shalt say to the children of Israel, Whosoever he be of the children of Israel, or of the strangers that sojourn in Israel, that giveth any of his seed unto Molech; he shall surely be put to death: the people of the land shall stone him with stones.
1Kings 11:7 Then did Solomon build an high place for Chemosh, the abomination of Moab, in the hill that is before Jerusalem, and for Molech, the abomination of the children of Ammon.

"To 'evah" also means "something which is ritually unclean."
But also, concerning music, some have fabled that Apollo [Abaddon, Apollyon]  was the inventor, and others say that Orpheus discovered the art of music from the sweet voices of the birds. Their story is shown to be empty and vain, for these inventors lived many years after the flood. And what relates to Noah, who is called by some Deucalion, has been explained by us in the book before mentioned, and which, if you wish it, you are at liberty to read.
Jesus as Holy Spirit let Paul see and hear him to qualify him for speaking the Words of God in Christ.  Those who despise the Word will always be the MANY in Paul's letters saying long prayers (hymns) to eat up the living of the poor and widows.

Second, even simple simons would want to define words and grasp that Paul is hiding some deep truth in PLAIN VIEW according to Peter.

Third, the object was to obey the Words of God and not the Words of the hypocritic class: rhetoricians, singers and instrument players the latter musicians almost always being women or excluded effeminate males.
2Corinthians 11:3 But I fear, lest by any means, as the serpent beguiled [wholly seduced] Eve
        through his subtilty,
        so your minds should be corrupted from the simplicity that is in Christ.
Exa^pa^taō , deceive or beguile, deceive thoroughly, seduce a woman, Hdt.2.114:
sumbol-aion  A MARK III. intercourse, “andros pros gunaika” Plu.Alex.30, cf. Ant.25.
Euazō , euazō , A. cry euai, in honour of Bacchus, S.Ant.1134 (lyr.), E.Ba. 1034 (lyr.); “Dionusō” AP9.363.11 (Mel.), cf. D.S.4.3, Callistr.Stat.2: c. acc. cogn., “melōdon eu. khoron” Sopat.10:—Med., “Bakkhion -omena” E. Ba.68

Euriipides Bacchae
[64] From Asia o'er the holy ridge of
Tmolus hasten to a pleasant task, a toil that brings no weariness, for Bromius' sake, in honour of the Bacchic god. Who loiters in the road? who lingers 'neath the roof? Avaunt!
I say, and let every lip be hushed in solemn silence;
for I will
raise a hymn to Dionysus [Lit. shouting the ritual cry euoi.]
as custom aye ordains.
[73] O happy he! who to his joy is initiated in heavenly mysteries and leads a holy life, joining heart and soul in Bacchic revelry upon the hills,
purified from every sin; observing the rites of Cybele, the mighty mother, and brandishing the thyrsus, with ivy-wreathed head, he worshis Dionysus.
Go, Bacchae, go, Bacchae, escorting the god Bromius, child of a god, [85] from the Phrygian mountains to the broad streets of Hellas—Bromius,
The Mysteries Judaism Dunlap Latin Havam Arise, see, the Splen- dor (light) of the Newest MAN 1 (i. e. of Fetahil) has failed, the decrease of this Splendor is visible. Rise up, lie with thy MOTHER, and free thee from limits by which thou art held, and those more ample than the whole world. Which having been heard, that Wicked One, 2 his bones jumping, lay with the i " The Son of the MAN." Novissimus = Newest, Latest.
2 Compare the Vallis Eegia, xxxii. 11 ; xlii. 2, where the Serpent lay with Chava.
— Kabbal. Den., II. 306. Chava is Heuah (Eua, Eve.) 52 sod, SPIRITUS.
Understanding that at Mount Sinai because of instrumental idolatry God turned Israel over to worship the starry host: whatever they called their gods under the Monarchy it was a SUN god always worshipped on the SEVENTH day
The God Ell was the primal God of the Semite race known to the Hebrews as Hael (Hel), the Greek Aelios and Helios. The Cretan God Abel (Abelios) is in Babylon Bel, the Bal, Abel, or Habol of the Jews, the Greek Apolldn, Cretan Apellon. The Tower of Bel at Babylon with its seven stages is duplicated in the Syrian and Hebrew-Gheber High Places and in the Pyramids of Egypt,—without however the seven stages of Bel's tower at Babylon; Bel's temples were on the High Places. ....Only that when the Priests of the Jewish Temple in the Second Century before our era compiled or wrote the Hebrew Old Testament they substituted the God of tire, life, and rain instead of Bal (Baal), abused the Chaldaean stargazers (2 Kings, xxiii.), and left out as much of the-religion of Babylon as they possibly could. For Bel and Astarta, As and Aisah, or Osiris and Esi (Isis), they wrote Adam and Eua (Heuah), because they did not choose to surrender the doc. GHEBEBS OF HEBBO, SAMUEL FALES DUNLAP 
     so your minds should be corrupted from the simplicity that is in Christ.
-Panourg-κma  A. knavish trick, villainy, S.El.1387 (lyr.), LXX Si.1.6 (v.l.); sophistry, Gal.5.251; cf. panourgeuma.

Cunning craftiness has the same meaning as SOPHOS:
-Sophia A. cleverness or skill in handicraft and art, as in carpentry, tektonos, hos rha te pasēs eu eidē s. Il.15.412; of the Telchines, Pi.O.7.53; entekhnos s., of Hephaestus and Athena, Pl.Prt.32 1d; of Daedalus and Palamedes, X.Mem.4.2.33, cf. 1.4.2; in music and singing, tekhnē kai s. h.Merc.483, cf. 511; in poetry, Sol.13.52, Pi.O.1.117
1Cor. 3:18 Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you
        seemeth to be wise [sophos] in this world,
        let him become a fool, that he may be wise.
1Cor. 3:19 For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God.
        For it is written,
        He taketh the wise  sophia
        in their own craftiness. pa^nourg-ia
1Cor. 3:20 And again,
        The Lord knoweth the thoughts of the wise, sophōn
        that they are vain.
matai-os 
Eph 4:14 That we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro, 
        and carried about with every wind of doctrine,
        by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness
whereby they lie in wait to deceive;
Feminists Theology insists on imposing female ROLES for which there is no DOLE and no Biblical function. Sophia is opposite of the WORD and intends to lead people astray. THE MEANING OF THE BEAST.

Sophia Zoe The Origin - she who is with Sabaoth - had anticipated them. And she laughed at their decision. For they are blind: against their own interests they ignorantly created him. And they do not realize what they are about to do.
          The reason she anticipated them and made her own man first,
          was in order that he might instruct their modeled form how to despise them, and thus to escape from them.

Now the production of the instructor came about as follows.
          When Sophia let fall a droplet of light, it flowed onto the water,
       
and immediately a human being appeared, being androgynous.

That droplet she molded first as a female body. Afterwards, using the body she molded it in the likeness of the mother, which had appeared. And he finished it in twelve months.

An androgynous human being was produced, whom the Greeks call Hermaphrodites; and whose mother the Hebrews call

Eve of Life (Eve-Zoe), namely, the female instructor of life. Her offspring is the creature that is lord.
Afterwards, the authorities called it "Beast", so that it might lead astray their modeled creatures.
The interpretation of "the beast" is "the instructor". For it was found to be the wisest of all beings.
FOURTH: THAT'S WHY  THE BIBLICAL COMMAND IS ABSOLUTE FOR BELIEVERS
1Timothy 2:11 Let the woman learn in silence with all subjection.
1Timothy 2:12 But I suffer not a woman to teach,
        nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence.
1Timothy 2:13 For Adam was first formed, then Eve.
1Timothy 2:14 And Adam was not deceived,
        but the woman being deceived was in the transgression.

Sē-dūco ,
Exodus 22:16 And if a man entice a maid that is not betrothed, and lie with her, he shall surely endow her to be his wife.

Praevārĭcātĭo a stepping out of the line of duty, a violation of duty; esp. of an advocate who has a secret understanding with the opposite party, the making of a sham accusation or defence, collusion, prevarication

The daughters of Eve--feminists and the effeminate-seek to betray their friends to LOOSEN them from any laws or commandments. absolvam, In-culco , ram down: B. To force upon, to impress on or inculcate in
mixed or foisted in: “inania verba,” Cic. Or. 69, 250: arkhetupon crebris locis inculcatum et refectum, emphasized by additions,

Rick Atchley and Chris Seidman working with the NACC defines the PATTERN
The generation of Boomers has enough denominational loyalty that they’re going to find the least legalistic

Well, we discipled the children of those progressive churches
        for a whole generation to grow past us Boomers.
        They never heard the sermons we heard.
        They never heard the rationale for a cappella music.

We sent them to youth rallies and Church of Christ events
        with some of the finest Christian bands in the world.

        We discipled our children to leave our Movement!

Isaiah 5 warns that the wine, women and instruments at their religious festivals invited God to break down the fenses and let the BEAST people in.

Aristotle: Melody Deceives: "Poets also make use of this in inventing words, as a melody "without strings" or "without the lyre"; for they employ epithets from negations, a course which is approved in proportional metaphors..

The form of diction should be neither metrical nor without rhythm.
 If it is metrical, it lacks persuasiveness, for it appears artificial, and at the same time it distracts the hearer's attention, since it sets him on the watch for the recurrence of such and such a cadence..

According to Philo, the gods of the pagans exploit this weakness of men. For the sake of a better effect, and with the intention of more easily cheating their devotes, that they have set their lies to melodies, rhythms and meters.." Click for more.

FIFTH that the women not get involved with the AUTHENTIA authority which is imposed by female "musical worship teams" knowing that they will seduce in more SEEKERS: a favorite word of Hitler.
1Timothy 2:15 Notwithstanding she shall be saved [SAFE] in childbearing,
        if they continue in faith and charity and holiness with sobriety. 

Strabo comments:

For instance, the Bendideian rites are mentioned by Plato, and the Phrygian by Demosthenes,
          when he casts the reproach upon Aeschines' mother and Aeschines himself
          that he was with her when she conducted initiations,
          that he joined her in leading the Dionysiac march,
          and that many a time he cried out "evoe saboe," and "hyes attes, attes hyes";
          for these words are in the ritual of Sabazius (Dionysus) and the Mother.

[10.3.19] Further, one might also find, in addition to these facts concerning these genii (spirits or demons) and their various names, that they were called,
          not only ministers of gods,
          but also gods themselves.

For instance, Hesiod says that five daughters were born to Hecaterus and the daughter of Phoroneus, from whom sprang the mountain-ranging nymphs, goddesses,
          and the breed of Satyrs (Effeminate musical clergy),
          creatures worthless and unfit for work,
          and also the Curetes, sportive gods, dancers.

And the author of Phoronis speaks of the
          Curetes as "flute-players" and "Phrygians"; and
          others as "earth-born" and "wearing brazen shields."

In the Babylonian epics, Inana fills this role:

321-326 Your lady Inana, the ......,

the singular woman, the dragon who speaks hostile words to
who
shines in brightness, who goes against the rebel land,

through whom the firmament is made beautiful in the evening, the great daughter of Suen, holy Inana, has erected a house in your precinct, O house Zabalam, and taken her seat upon your dais.

328-345 O house inspiring terror like a great lion, making as clear as day the decisions for those on the high plain, house of Ickur, at your front is abundance, at your rear is celebration.

Your foundation is a horned bull, a lion. Holy staff, teat of heaven with rain for fine barley, the pilasters of your house are a wild bull with lowered horns, your ......,

foundation and wall rising of their own accord, ......, thick cloud, ...... snake, ...... moonlight, ...... Ickur, a sweeping flood, ...... a storm and seven raging winds, ......, blowing raging winds, ...... running from the ......, splits the ...... hillside, diorite, stones and .......

The Parable of the Serpent;
1Samuel 11:2 And Nahash the Ammonite answered them,
        On this condition will I make a covenant with you,
        that I may thrust out all your right eyes,
        and lay it for a reproach upon all Israel.
1Samuel 11:3 And the elders of Jabesh said unto him,
        Give us seven days’ respite, that we may send messengers unto all the coasts of Israel:
        and then, if there be no man to save us, we will come out to thee.
They worshipped the STARRY HOST because of musical idolatry at Mount Sinai

2Chronicles 33:5 And he built altars for all the host of heaven [COSMIC WORSHIP]
        in the two courts of the house of the LORD.
2Chronicles 33:6 And he caused his children to pass through the fire in the valley of the son of Hinnom: also he observed times, and used enchantments, and used witchcraft, and dealt with a familiar spirit, and with wizards: he wrought much evil in the sight of the LORD, to provoke him to anger.

[6] transireque fecit filios suos per ignem in valle Benennon observabat somnia sectabatur auguria maleficis artibus inserviebat habebat secum magos et incantatores multaque mala operatus est coram Domino ut inritaret eum

ignis , Charis A. (Mostly poet.) The fire or glow of passion, in a good or bad sense; of anger, rage, fury: “exarsere ignes animo,” Verg. A. 2, 575: “saevos irarum concipit ignes,” Val. Fl. 1, 748
“quae simul aethereos animo conceperat ignes, ore dabat pleno carmina vera dei,”  “(Dido) caeco carpitur igni,” the secret fire of love, Verg. A. 4, 2 

ars , artis, f. v. arma,
(a). Rhetorical : “quam multa non solum praecepta in artibus, sed etiam exempla in orationibus bene dicendi reliquerunt!” Cic. Fin. 4, 3, 5: “ipsae rhetorum artes, quae sunt totae forenses atque populares,” id. ib. 3, 1, 4: neque eo dico, quod ejus (Hermagorae) ars mihi mendosissime scripta videatur; nam satis in eā videtur ex antiquis artibus (from the ancient works on rhetoric) ingeniose et diligenter electas res collocāsse, id. Inv. 1, 6 fin.: “illi verbis et artibus aluerunt naturae principia, hi autem institutis et legibus,” id. Rep. 3, 4, 7: “artem scindens Theodori,” Juv. 7, 177

carmen  1. In gen., a tune, song, air, lay, strain, note, sound, both vocal and instrumental sc. Apollinem [Apollo, Abaddon] concordant carmina nervis, “barbaricum,

Augŭrātrix , īcis, f. id.,I. a female soothsayer or diviner (post-class.), Vulg. Isa. 57, 3 (as transl. of the Heb. ; but in Paul. ex Fest. p. 117, the correct reading is argutatrix; v. Mόll. ad h. l.).

Isa 57:3 But draw near hither, ye sons of the sorceress, the seed of the adulterer and the whore.
2K.21:6 And he made his son pass through the fire, and observed times, and used enchantments, and dealt with familiar spirits and wizards: he wrought much wickedness in the sight of the Lord, to provoke him to anger.
Canto carmen ,I. In gen., a tune, song, air, lay, strain, note, sound, both vocal and instrumenta, carmen tubacitharāqueWith allusion to playing on the cithara:
Incantātĭo , a means of BINDING
I. an enchanting, enchantment (post-class.): “magicae, Firm. Math. 5, 5: incantationum
in-canto , I. To sing in, with dat.: “passer incantans saepiculae (i. e. in saepicula),
A. To say over, mutter, or chant a magic formula against some one
Mostly women: “incantata mulier,” id. ib.: “pileum vetitis artibus,”

No ancient was so ignorant that they did not understand when a man came speaking to them with singing and instruments: Plato says they should be "tarred and feathered and driven across state line."

Aristotle: Melody Deceives: "Poets also make use of this in inventing words, as a melody "without strings" or "without the lyre"; for they employ epithets from negations, a course which is approved in proportional metaphors..

The form of diction should be neither metrical nor without rhythm.
 If it is metrical, it lacks persuasiveness, for it appears artificial, and at the same time it distracts the hearer's attention, since it sets him on the watch for the recurrence of such and such a cadence..

According to Philo, the gods of the pagans exploit this weakness of men. For the sake of a better effect, and with the intention of more easily cheating their devotes, that they have set their lies to melodies, rhythms and meters.." Click for more.

Serpo ,
I.  Lit. (only of animals; while repo is also used of persons who creep or go slowly; “
“serpentes quasdam (bestias), quasdam esse gradientes,” id. Tusc. 5, 13, 38: “(anguis) per humum,” Ov. M. 15, 689: “vipera imā humo,
“exsistit sacer ignis et urit corpore serpens,” slowly spreading, Lucr. 6, 660; so, “flamma per continua,” Liv. 30, 6: “aestus aetheris,” Lucr. 5, 523; 6, 1120
Of disease, etc.: “si ulcus latius atque altius serpit,” gradually spreads,
II. Trop., to creep, crawl; to extend gradually or imperceptibly; to spread abroad, increase, prevail
“serpere occulte coepisti nihil dum aliis suspicantibus,” id. de Or. 2, 50, 203:
—Of a low, grovelling poetic style: “(poλta)
CLICK TO SEE THE BEASTIA BELOW
grădĭor
I. To take steps, to step, walk, go
vīpĕra  B. Viper! serpent! as a term of reproach for a dangerous person: “saevissima,” Juv. 6, 641:
tandem, vipera, sibilare
Cic. Har. 24.50 Is it possible that any virtuous men could have cherished in their bosom and have taken pleasure in, that poisonous and deadly viper? By what bribe were they cajoled? I wish, say they, that there should be some one in the assembly to disparage Pompeius. Can he disparage him by his abuse?
saevus , “tyrannus, Tib. 1, 1, 18: “catenae,” Hor. C. 3, 11, 45: tympana, sounding harshly or terribly,
sībĭlo
to hiss, i. e. to hiss at, hiss down a person, “at mihi plaudo Ipse domi,” Hor. S. 1, 1, 66.
“tandem, vipera, sibilare desiste,” Flor. 4, 12, 37; cf. Don. Ter. Eun. 5, 1, 8.
Mūsa , ae, f., = Mousa, I. [select] a muse, one of the goddesses of poetry, music, and the other liberal arts.
A. [select] A song, a poem: “musa procax,” Hor. C. 2, 1, 37:
Mousa , “kanakhan  liberal arts, accomplishments,
2. hautē Sōkratous m. that was Socrates's way,
II. mousa, as Appellat., music, song, “m. stugera” [women only]
Aesch. Supp. 695 Chorus
May Zeus cause the earth to bring forth its tribute of fruit [690] by the produce of every season; may their grazing cattle in the fields have abundant increase, and may they obtain all things from the heavenly powers. [695] May minstrels sing hymns of praise at the altars; and from pure lips let there proceed the phorminx-loving chant. [harp of Apollo, Abaddon, Apollyon]
Matthew 23:29 Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites!
        because ye build the tombs of the prophets,
        and garnish the sepulchres of the righteous,
The Spirit OF Christ warned about the Lying Pen of the Scribes as they spoke about the temple because in Isaiah 1 and Jeremiah 7 (etal) He says that God did not command the Civil-Military-Clergy complex whom He calls robbers and parasites.
Matthew 23:33 Ye serpents [serpo], ye generation of vipers [vīpĕra], how can ye escape the damnation of hell?
Matthew 23:34 Wherefore, behold, I send unto you prophets, and wise men, and scribes: and some of them ye shall kill and crucify; and some of them shall ye scourge in your synagogues, and persecute them from city to city:
Christ's ROPHECY OF THE BEAST

Jeremiah 15:2 And it shall come to pass,
        if they say unto thee, Whither shall we go forth?
        then thou shalt tell them, Thus saith the LORD;
        Such as are for death, to death;
        and such as are for the sword, to the sword;
        and such as are for the famine, to the famine;
        and such as are for the captivity, to the captivity.

Jeremiah 15:3 And I will appoint over them four kinds, saith the LORD:
        the sword to slay,
        and the dogs to tear,
        and the fowls of the heaven,
        and the beasts of the earth,
        to devour and destroy.


THE BEAST
-Besta
2.As a term of reproach (cf. belua and our beast): “mala tu es bestia,” Plaut. Bacch. 1, 1, 21; -Pl. Poen. 5.5.—And, humorously, of the odor of the armpits (cf. ala and caper. cappella), Cat. 69, 8 II. Transf., as a constellation, the wotf, Vitr. 9, 4 (7)
cănis (cănes , Plaut. Men. 5, 1, 18; id. Trin. 1, 2, 133;
B. “bestiarum vocabulum proprie convenit leonibus, pardis et lupis, tigribus et vulpibus,
a. A shameless, vile person, Plaut. Most. 1, 1, 40; Ter. Eun. 4, 7, 33
2. As the regular designation of the hangers-on or parasites of an eminent or rich Roman; a follower, dog, creature:
a. Tergeminus, i. e. Cerberus. Ov. A. A. 3, 322; id. Tr. 4, 7, 16; “called also viperius,” id. Am. 3, 12, 26: “Tartareus,” Sen. Herc. Fur. 649: “triformis,” id. Herc. Oet. 1202: Echidnaea. Ov. M. 7, 409; cf.: “infernae canes,” Hor. S. 1, 8, 35; Verg. A. 6, 257; Luc. 6, 733. ——
Trĭformis , e, adj. ter - forma,
I. having three forms, shapes, or natures; threefold, triple, triform (poet.): “Chimaera,” Hor. C. 1, 27, 23: “canis,” i. e. Cerberus, Sen. Herc. Oet. 1202: “Geryon,” id. Agam. 841: All pagan god heads were trinitarian.
diva, i. e. Diana, who was also Luna and Hecate, Hor. C. 3, 22, 4; called also triformis dea,

Ov. M. 7, 94
: “mundus, because composed of air, earth, and water,” id. ib. 15, 859

Pl. Bac. 1.1 Note: Your Bacchanalian den: "Bacchanal" was properly the place where the Bacchanalia,  or orgies, were celebrated. He styles them "Bacchantes," and their house a "Bacchanal," in allusion both to their names and their habits

7 Mischievous serpent: "Mala tu's bestia." Literally, "you are an evil beast;" which sounds harsh to an English ear, even when applied to such an animal as Bacchis. Bacchanet minister of Bacchus.
Baccha  Mainas or Thuias,
I. a Bacchanet, a female attendant of Bacchus, who, in company with Silenus and the Satyrs, celebrated the festival of that deity with a raving madness carried even to insensibility, and with hair loose and flying wildly about, to initiate into the festivals of Bacchus, Mūsa , ae, f., = Mousa, II. mousa, as Appellat., music, song, “m. stugera” A.Eu.308 DAUGHTERS: Always Daughters
13 A soft cloak: It was the custom at entertainments for the revellers to exchange their ordinary clothes for fine vestments, elaborately embroidered.

But what went ye out for to see? A man clothed in soft raiment? behold, they that wear soft clothing are in kings houses. Mat 11:8
Matthew 11:16 But whereunto shall I liken this generation? It is like unto children sitting in the markets, and calling unto their fellows,
Matthew 11:17 And saying, We have piped unto you, and ye have not danced; we have mourned unto you, and ye have not lamented. 

Malakos g. of reasoning, weak, loose, logosIsoc.12.logoslian m. Arist.Metaph.1090b8 . Adv. -kτs, sullogizesthai to reason loosely
2. music to which a song is set, tune, logou te kai harmonias kai rhuthmoum
III. of persons or modes of life, soft, mild, gentle, malakōteros amphaphaasthai easier to handle, of a fallen hero, Il.22.373;
c. morally weak, lacking in self-control, Hdt.7.153 (Comp.); “antikeitai m. ho karterikos” Arist.EN1150a33: c. inf., “malakos karterein pros hēdonas te kai lupas” Pl.R.556c; “to truphōn kai m.” Ar.V.1455 (lyr.); not to give in from weakness or want of spirit,   indulgences

2 Peter 2:12 But these, as natural [instinctive] brute [Anti-Logical] brute beasts, [Zoon, Zao, Zoe]
          made to be taken and destroyed,
          speak evil of the things that they understand not;
            [through lack of knowledge]

          and shall utterly perish in their own corruption;
 2 Peter 2.13 receiving the wages of unrighteousness; people who count it pleasure to revel in the day-time, spots and blemishes, reveling in their deceit while they feast with you;

See 2 Peter2 Instrumental Music Marks Corruption
d. = pathētikos, PHib.1.54.11 (iii B.C.), 1 Ep.Cor.6.9, Vett.Val.113.22, D.L.7.173.
e. of music, soft, effeminate, “m. harmoniai” Pl.R.398e, 411a, cf. Arist.Pol.1290a28; tuned to a low pitch, opp. “suntonos, khrōma m.” Cleonid.Harm.7, etc.
-Pl. Poen. 5.5

ANTHEMONIDES
to himself . I'm delaying. Looking in his hand. I can now pretty nearly cater a breakfast for myself with this. Raising his eyes. But what's this? How's this? What's this? What's this I see? How now? What means this strange conjunction? What's this coupling together? Who's this fellow with the long skirts, just like a tavern-boy? Do I quite see with my eyes? Isn't this my mistress, Anterastylis? Why, surely it is she. For some time past I've perceived that I'm set at nought. Isn't the girl ashamed to be hugging a tawny fellow in the middle of the street? I faith, I shall give him up forthwith to the executioner to be tortured all over. Surely this is a womanish race5, with their tunics hanging down to their heels. But I'm determined to accost this African female lover. To HANNO. Hallo! you woman, I say, are you not ashamed? What business have you with her, pray? Tell me.

ANTHEMONIDES
Why didn't you use a drum while you were saying that? For I take you to be more of an effeminate wretch than a real man.

AGORASTOCLES
Do you understand what sort of effeminate wretch I am? Calling aloud. Servants, come out of doors, bring out some cudgels!

5 A womanish race: "Muliersous" generally means "fond of women." It clearly however, in this passage means "womanish," or "womanlike."

9 Use a drum: The priests of Cybele, who were either eunuchs, or persons of effeminate and worthless character, walked in their processions beating a "tympanum." a "drum" or "tambourine." The Captain, by his question, contemptuously implies that Agorastocles is such a character. See the Truer lentus, l. 608, and the Note.

cănis
“canem inritatam imitarier,” Plaut. Capt. 3, 1, 25:
Verg. A. 3.374
that shapeless Scylla in her vaulted cave,
where grim rocks echo her dark sea-dogs' roar.
Yea, more, if aught of prescience be bestowed
on Helenus, if trusted prophet he,
and Phoebus to his heart true voice have given,
o goddess-born, one counsel chief of all
I tell thee oft, and urge it o'er and o'er.
To Juno's godhead lift thy Ioudest prayer;
to Juno chant a fervent votive song,
and with obedient offering persuade
that potent Queen. So shalt thou, triumphing,
to Italy be sped, and leave behind
Trinacria.
rĕ-sŏno  to send forth a roaring noiseB. [select] Trop., to resound, re-echo: “in vocibus nostrorum oratorum
“(sonus) in fidibus testudine resonatur aut cornu,” Cic. N. D. 2, 57, 144. — Poet., with acc. of a place, to make resound or re-echo: “ubi Solis filia lucos Assiduo resonat cantu,” Verg. A. 7, 
lŭpus  Plin. 8, 22, 34, § 80.—Prov.: lupus in fabulā or sermone, said of the appearance of a person when he is spoken of; as we say in English, talk of the devil, and he appears: “
Lupus observavit, dum dormitaret canes, of one who watches his opportunity to be unobserved, Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 133
The Prototype of Babylon-Tyre Israel. Sodom not spiritual Israel. Jesus referenced Isaiah and Ezekiel to define the national Worship of the Starry Host--Abaddon The End-Time Fulfillment
For thus saith the Lord God; Behold, I will bring upon Tyrus Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon, a king of kings, from the north, with horses, and with chariots, and with horsemen, and companies, and much people. Ezek 26:7

They will plunder your wealth and
    loot your merchandise;
    they will break down your walls
    and demolish your fine houses

    and throw your stones, TIMBER and rubble into the sea. Ezek 26:12
Also, thou son of man, the children of thy people still are talking against thee by the walls and in the doors of the houses,

and speak one to another, every one to his brother, saying,

Come, I pray you, and hear what is the word that cometh forth from the Lord. Eze 33:30

Rev 17:3 So he carried me away in the spirit into the wilderness: and I saw a woman sit upon a scarlet coloured BEAST, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns.
   Rev 17:4 And the woman was arrayed in purple and scarlet colour, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls, having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication:
   Rev 17:5 And upon her forehead was a name written, MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT, THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS OF THE EARTH.
   Rev 17:6 And I saw the woman drunken with the blood of the saints, and with the blood of the martyrs of Jesus: and when I saw her, I wondered with great admiration.
I will put an end to your noisy songs, and the music [sound] of your harps will be heard no more. Ezek 26:13

The LXX is more forceful in showing that both the music and the musicians would be silenced---





"And he shall destroy the multitude of thy musicians, and the sound of thy psalteries shall be heard no more." Ezek. 26:13 L

My people come to you, as they usually do, and sit before you to listen to your words,
   but they do not put them into practice.

With their mouths they express devotion (Lord, Lord as amorousness - inordinate love),
     but their hearts are greedy for unjust gain (commerce or trade or attendance). Eze 33:3 

Ezekiel 33:32 And, lo, thou art unto them as a very lovely song
of one that hath a pleasant voice,
and can play well on an instrument:
  for they hear thy words,
     but they do them not.

Rev 18:1 And after these things I saw another angel come down from heaven, having great power; and the earth was lightened with his glory. 2 And he cried mightily with a strong voice, saying, Babylon the great is fallen, is fallen, and is become the habitation of devils, and the hold of every foul spirit, and a cage of every unclean and hateful bird

And the voice of harpers, and musicians, and of pipers, and trumpeters, shall be heard no more at all in thee; and no craftsman, of whatsoever craft he be, shall be found any more in thee; and the sound of a millstone shall be heard no more at all in thee; Rev 18:22

I will make thee a terror, and thou shalt be no more:
    though thou be sought for,
    yet shalt thou never be found again, saith the Lord God. Ezek 26:2
When all this comes true--

and it surely will--

then they will know that a prophet has been among them." Eze 33:33

Revelation 19:19 And I saw the beast, and the kings of the earth, and their armies, gathered together to make war against him that sat on the horse, and against his army.
   Revelation 19:20 And the beast was taken, and with him the false prophet that wrought miracles before him, with which he deceived them that had received the mark of the beast, and them that worshipped his image. These both were cast alive into a lake of fire burning with brimstone

2 PETER 2

THE BEAST THE MOTHER OF HALOTS RIDES TO USE SORCERY TO TAKE AWAY YOUR INHERITANCE

da^pa^n-aō  2. consume, use up, “ phusis d. ton thoron” Arist.GA757a25; “khronon eis
of persons, to be destroyed, “hupo thēriōn” Ph.2.43; kathaper hupo puros ib.433; “pros thēriōn” App. BC5.79; “en tartarois kai barathrois
puri kai phonō kai sidērō panta dapanēsasthai   “en tartarois kai barathrois dapanōmenous”

WASTE THE PUBLIC'S MONEY

thērion , III. as a term of reproach, beast.
“kolaki, deinō thēriō” Pl.Phdr.240b;
“ mousikē aei ti kainon thērion tiktei”

Meaning: A new style of music or drama!

Tarta^r-os , the nether world generally,

And altogether the ancient philosoj)hy of the Greeks appears to have been very much addicted to music; and on this account they judged Apollo to have been the most musical and the wisest of the gods, and Orpheus of the demigods. And they called every one who devoted himself to the study of this art a sophist, as
Aeschylus does in the verse where he says — And then the sophist sweetly struck the lyre.

Musae (Mousai). In Greek mythology the Muses were originally the nymphs of springs, whose waters gave inspiration, such as Hippocrenι, Castalia, etc.; then goddesses of song in genera. They are all female and are considered goddesses dwelling in Olympus, who at the meals of the gods sing sweetly to the lyre of Apollo. They are the nine daughters of Zeus. 

Sophis-tκs , ou, ho, master of one's craft, adept, expert, of diviners, Hdt.2.49; of poets, meletan sophistais prosbalon Pi.I.5(4).28 , cf. Cratin.2; of musicians, sophistκs . . parapaiτn chelun A.Fr.314 , cf. Eup.447, Pl.Com. 140; sophistκi Thrκiki (sc. Thamyris) E.Rh.924, cf. Ath.14.632c: with mod

II. from late v B.C., a Sophist, i.e. one who gave lessons in grammar, rhetoric, politics, mathematics, for money, such as Prodicus, Gorgias, Protagoras, a quibbler, cheat,  a RHETORICIAN as the primary meaning of a HYPOCRITE.

hoi s. tōn hierōn melōn” A sophist, serpent, makes MUSICAL MELODY with a congregation AS a harp and cannot grasp that IN THE HEART is a place.

2 Peter 2:12 But these, as natural brute beasts, [Zoon, Zao, Zoe]
          made to be taken and destroyed,
          speak evil of the things that they understand not;
          and shall utterly perish in their own corruption;

Natural: G5446 phusikos foo-see-kos' From G5449 [natural descent] ; “physical”, that is, (by implication) instinctive:--natural. Compare G5591
Bruit: G249 alogos [Anti-Logical] al'-og-os From G1 (as a negative particle) and G3056 ; irrational:--brute, unreasonable.
Beasts: G2226 zōon dzo'-on Neuter of a derivative of G2198 [Zao, Zoe] ; a live thing, that is, an animal:--beast.
căprīle , is, n. caper, like equile, ovile, bubile, etc., I. an enclosure or stall for goats, Varr. R. R. 2, 3, 8; Col. 7, 6, 6; Plin. 28, 10, 42, § 153; Vitr. 6, 9Adj.: căprīlis , e, of or pertaining to the goat: “semen, i. e. capellae,

2 Peter 2:13 And shall receive the reward of unrighteousness,
          as they that count it pleasure to riot in the day time.
          Spots they are and blemishes, sporting themselves
          with their own deceivings [delusions] while they feast with you;

          All musicians and rhetoricians are equated to parasites.

Entrupo (g1792) en-troo-fah'-o; from 1722 and 5171; to revel in: - sporting selves.
gamκliτi lechei [marriage couch-bed] hκdonais, playing in the wind, exult over, treat haughtily or contemptuously, made a mock of, tinos sumphorais, III. use or abuse at pleasure
Entru^ph-aō

Paison paizτ [pais]
4.
to play (on an instrument), Hhymn. II. to sport, play, jest, joke, Hdt., Xen., etc.; p. pros tina to make sport of one, mock him,

REVELATION CHAPTER 4

Revelation 4:6 And before the throne there was a sea of glass like unto crystal:
        and in the midst of the throne, and round about the throne,
        were four beasts full of eyes before and behind.

Anĭmālis , B. In the lang. of sacrifice: “hostia animalis,” an offering of which only the life is consecrated to the gods, but the flesh is destined for the priests and others, Macr. S. 3, 5; Serv. ad Verg. A. 3, 231; 4, 56.—Dii animales, gods who were formerly men, Opposite. spiritualiter

zōē   living, i.e. one's substance, property, to get one's living by [parasites]
II.  zōē,= “graus” 11, the scum on milk, Eust.906.52; zoē: to epanō tou melitos

Esthiō —Pass., esthietai moi oikos my house is eaten up, I am eaten out of house and home, 4.318
Pass., esthietai moi oikos my house is eaten up, I am eaten out of house and home, 4.318 ;
4. take in one's mouth, “glōttan aulou” Philostr.Im.1.20.

Mark 12:38 And he said unto them in his doctrine,
        Beware of the scribes, which love to go in long clothing,
        and love salutations in the marketplaces,
Mark 12:39 And the chief seats in the synagogues, and the uppermost rooms at feasts:
Mark 12:40 Which devour widows’ houses,
        and for a pretence make long prayers [hymns]: these shall receive greater damnation.


Religious Musicians are defined by the words Beastia or Theiron.  Sacrificial instrument players used as modern patters were soothsayers and were called parasites.

All musical terms and names of instrument relate to enchantment, soothsaying (Miriam, the Levites) or Sorcery (The effeminate ministers of the Babylonian mother of harlots in Revelation) John identified as speakers, singers, instrument players, all religious craftsmen and GRINDERS: the sound of the millstone located the local prostitute.

The MARK or BITE of the Beasts or musical sorcerers which connects musical sounds to the Spirit of God is a terminal addiction which cannot be repented of: you become hard wired and addicted to something more powerful than Cocaine.
Adam Smikth in 1778 wrote: The institutions for the instruction of people of all ages are chiefly those for religious instruction. This is a species of instruction of which the object is not so much to render the people good citizens in this world, as to prepare them for another and a better world in a life to come. The teachers of the doctrine which contains this instruction, in the same manner as other teachers, may either depend altogether for their subsistence upon the voluntary contributions of their hearers, or they may derive it from some other fund to which the law of their country may entitle them; such as a landed estate, a tithe or land tax, an established salary or stipend.

Their exertion, their zeal and industry, are likely to be much greater in the former situation than in the latter. In this respect the teachers of new religions have always had a considerable advantage in attacking those ancient and established systems of which the clergy, reposing themselves upon their benefices, had neglected to keep up the fervour of faith and devotion in the great body of the people, and having given themselves up to indolence, were become altogether incapable of making any vigorous exertion in defence even of their own establishment.

Such a clergy, when attacked by a set of popular and bold, though perhaps stupid and ignorant enthusiasts, feel themselves as perfectly defenceless as the indolent, effeminate, and full-fed nations of the southern parts of Asia when they were invaded by the active, hardy, and hungry Tartars of the North... 

Upon such occasions the advantage in point of learning and good writing may sometimes be on the side of the established church.

But the arts of popularity, all the arts of gaining proselytes, are constantly on the side of its adversaries.

The mendicant orders derive their whole subsistence from such oblations. It is with them as with the hussars and light infantry of some armies;

no plunder, no pay.

To Ask "Instrumental Music in Worship?" proves that most do not know the meaning of  Church or Worship. Many (most) are called but few (nil) are chosen. That is because the call or invitation is to be extended by evangelists going into all the world and preaching the gospel. 

Markus, Reciting the Book: These effects have implications for understanding who controls the production and dissemination of a prestigious high genre like epic (the politics of literary production) and what role the public, non-dramatic, authorial reading aloud of epic plays in the construction of gender and social status.

"Although the sermon was not an essential part of the synagogue service, the translation and explanation of the Scripture lesson was a step in the direction of a preaching service. There is evidence that an exposition of the lesson formed a part of the Sabbath afternoon service. In earliest times the sermon seems to have been connected with the reading from the Prophets. Anyone able to instruct might be asked to preach (Acts 13:15). The preacher spoke from a sitting position on an elevated place (Luke 4:20). (feiffer, Charles F., Between the Testaments, p. 63 Baker Book House).

"The word that is employed for this "anaginosko, anagnosis) is the technical term for the cultic reading aloud of the Old Testament in the synagogue. By applying this terminology to the reading of his own epistles he not only ascribes the same authority to the apostolic word as to the Old Testament writings...he also combines a quotation from the Old Testament with a word of Jesus and introduces the whole with the familiar formula: 'for the Scripture says.'" (Ridderbos, Hermon, Paul, P. 483 an Outline of His Theo., Eerdmans)

They were taught the doctrines concerning God, creation, providence, sacred history, the fall, the incarnation, the resurrection, and future rewards and punishments. Their books were portions of the Bible.

In that regard, epic's position is parallel to that of rhetoric. Beginning with Aristotle's Rhetorica (1404a), critics of rhetorical performance have ascribed to lively delivery the same effect as that of acting. There is a persistent association between theatrics, bad rhetoric and effeminacy.

Rhetoric was forever at pains to disentangle itself from unwanted associations with female deception and histrionic art,

because it was viewed as the art of socially weak women and slaves,
and
rhetoricians of all ages have assiduously fought against any trace of bodily and vocal practice associated with these groups.
Such gendering of aesthetic categories prevails not only in antiquity but appears also in Kant's distinction between the passive feminine beautiful and the active masculine sublime and in Rousseau's association of art and the theater with the feminine. I have in mind Kant's "The Beautiful and the Sublime" and "The Fair Sex" and Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "On Theater and Morals," in Kramnick (1995) 339;36.

Nevertheless, I think that I need to be more explicit in stating that the music which I prescribe is not the modern music which has been emasculated by the lascivious melodies of the effeminate stage and has to no small extent destroyed the amount of manly vigor that we still possessed.

I refer rather to the music of old with which people used to sing the praises of brave men and which the brave themselves used to sing.

Christ in Isaiah 3 warned about the rise of WOMEN and BOYS or the EFFEMINATE taking control away from the Father God and worshipping the feminist or now Lesbian goddess.

ON THE ORIGIN OF THE WORLD
Now the production of the instructor came about as follows.When Sophia let fall a droplet of light, it flowed onto the water, and immediately a human being appeared, being androgynous.
That droplet she molded first as a female body.
Afterwards, using the body she molded it in the likeness of the mother, which had appeared. And he finished it in twelve months.  An androgynous human being was produced, whom the Greeks call Hermaphrodites; and whose mother the Hebrews call
Eve of Life (Eve-Zoe), namely, the female instructor of life. Her offspring is the creature that is lord.

Afterwards, the authorities called it "Beast", so that it might lead astray their modeled creatures.
The interpretation of "the beast" is "the instructor". For it was found to be the wisest of all beings.
The gospel or good news is that Jesus died to terminate the laded burden and the burden laders: He called the Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrite. The reference to "mouth religion" was laid out in great detail by the Spirit OF Christ in the prophets: in the Ezekiel 33 version the hypocrites were entertaining preachers for profit, talented singers and skillful instrument players. They are NOTHING MORE than entertainers because the preacher nor the audience has any intention of obeying anything that comes to Ezekiel by the Spirit OF Christ.

John Calvin called for the Restoration of the Church of Christ by removing anything but the Word which he said carried the Spirit.  Calvin did not REMOVE instruments from worship because they had not be used in the official parts of the Catholic mass.  In fact, there was nothing that could be sung tunefully or accompanied when people were honorable enough to speak that which was written for out learning.

The Campbells brought the Restoration Principle to America: In the Christian Baptists 1824

Thomas Campbell in blue: "who, at the same time are ignorant of, and even averse to, the religion it inculcates; and whilst others profess to embrace it as a system of religion,

without imbibing the spirit, realizing the truth, and experiencing the power of its religious institutions; but merely superstruct to themselves, rest in, and are satisfied with, a form (acts) of godliness; and that, very often, a deficient, imperfect form, or such as their own imagination has devised;

"let us, with an open bible before us, distinguish and contemplate that religion which it enjoins and exhibits--I mean the religion of christianity, for it also exhibits the religion of Judaism;
...    but with this, in the mean time,
...    we christians have nothing directly to do--
...    we derive our religion immediately from the New Testament. TC

See Why Thomas Paine was a Deist.

But the men most and best informed upon the subject of theology rest themselves upon this universal article, and hold all the various superstructures erected thereon to be at least doubtful, if not altogether artificial.
The intellectual part of religion is a private affair between every man and his Maker, and in which no third party has any right to interfere.
 
The practical part consists in our doing good to each other.
  But since religion has been made into a trade, [NOTE: French: "since the most scandalous hypocrisy has made of Religion a profession and the basest trade." -- Editor.

the practical part has been made to consist of ceremonies performed by men called priests;
and the people have been amused with ceremonial shows, processions, and bells.
 
By devices of this kind true religion has been banished; and such means have been found out to extract money even from the pockets of the poor, instead of contributing to their relief. 
[NOTE: French adds: "du superflu de la richesse." (from their superfluous wealth). -- Editor.]

No man ought to make a living by Religion. It is dishonest so to do.

However, Christianity  is A School of Christ in the Prophets and Apostles. Anyone who adds buffoonery, self-speak (anti logos), musical instruments (machines for doing hard work, making war or creating the mental derangement of religious ceremonialism, is defined as IMPURE religion and is not the Qahal, Synagogue, Ekklesia or Church of Christ (the Rock) defined inclusively and exclusively as A School of the Word QUARANTINED from the pagan, sacrificial religion to which God abandoned Israel BECAUSE of instrumental idolatry at Mount Sinai.

While the Clergy SUPERSTRUCT and make war over what they call A Worship Service service with or without machines, the MARK OF THE BEAST- ancient and modern worship of the Babylonian Mother of harlots is defined for the FEW who are chosen to sit down, shut up and listen to the Word of God.

MARK: she uses lusted after FRUITS as Self-Speakers, singers and ALL of the players of musical instruments.
MARK: this is proof that Jesus has been there and will not pass by there again.

SEE AMOS 8 PROPHESYING THE MARK OF THE BEAST
Amos 8:2  And he said, Amos, what seest thou? And I said, A basket of summer fruit. Then said the LORD unto me, The end is come upon my people of Israel; I will not again pass by them any more.
Aristophanes Archarnians
DICAEOPOLIS
Peace, profane men! Let the basket-bearer come forward, and thou Xanthias, hold the phallus well upright.
  1. The maiden who carried the basket filled with fruits at the Dionysia in honour of Bacchus.
    kanēphoros: [pherτ] carrying a basket:-- Kanκphoroi, hai, Basket-bearers, at Athens, maidens who carried on their heads baskets containing the sacred things used at the feasts of Demeter, Bacchus and Athena, Ar. title of priestess, “k. theas Artemidos”
  2. The emblem of the fecundity of nature; it consisted of a representation, generally grotesquely exaggerated, of the male genital organs; the phallophori crowned with violets and ivy and their faces shaded with green foliage, sang improvised airs, call `Phallics,' full of obscenity and suggestive `double entendres.'
DICAEOPOLIS   Xanthias, walk behind the basket-bearer and hold the phallus well erect; I will follow, singing the Phallic hymn; thou, wife, look on from the top of the terrace.Forward!

DICAEOPOLISOh, Phales, [god of generation, worshipped in the form of a phallus]  companion of the orgies of Bacchus, night reveller, god of adultery, friend of young men, these past six years I have not been able to invoke thee.

CHORUS
Here is a man truly happy. See how everything succeeds to his wish. Peacefully seated in his market, he will earn his living; ....without being accosted on the public place by any importunate fellow,

neither by Cratinus, shaven in the fashion of the debauchees, nor by this musician, who plagues us with his silly improvisations, Artemo, with his arm-pits stinking as foul as a goat, like his father before him. You will not be the butt of the villainous Pauson's jeers, nor of Lysistratus, the disgrace of the Cholargian deme, who is the incarnation of all the vices, and endures cold and hunger more than thirty days in the month.

A BOEOTIAN By Heracles! my shoulder is quite black and blue. Ismenias, put the penny-royal down there very gently, and all of you, musicians from Thebes, pipe with your bone flutes

Amos 8:3 And the songs of the temple shall be howlings in that day, saith the Lord GOD: there shall be many dead bodies in every place; they shall cast them forth with silence.
Amos 8:4 Hear this, O ye that swallow up the needy, even to make the poor of the land to fail,

MARK: and TURNED OUT THE LAMPS (seven spirits of Christ all forms of divine knowledge)
Amos 8:11 Behold, the days come, saith the Lord GOD, that I will send a famine in the land,
        not a famine of bread, nor a thirst for water,
        but of hearing the words of the LORD:
Amos 8:12 And they shall wander from sea to sea, and from the north even to the east, t
        hey shall run to and fro to seek the word of the LORD, and shall not find it.
Amos 8:13 In that day shall the fair virgins and young men faint for thirst.
Amos 8:14 They that swear by the sin of Samaria, and say,
        Thy god, O Dan, liveth; and, The manner of Beersheba liveth;
        even they shall fall, and never rise up again.

PROPHECY OF THE BEAST BY CHRIST IN ISAIAH

Isaiah 3:4 And I will give children to be their princes, and babes shall rule over them.

Isaiah 3:4 et dabo pueros principes eorum et effeminati dominabuntur eis
        dominabuntur Ruler,  MARK Women or the Effeminate as  oratio,
        MARKWomen or effeminate who are consilium the person who forms the purpose, 
        MARKWomen or the effeminate who Teach Over  aedĭfĭco  in a religious sense, to build up, instruct, edify.

Isaiah 3:12 As for my people, children are their oppressors, and women rule over them.
        O my people, they that lead thee cause thee to err, and destroy the way of thy paths.

mŭlĭer as a term of reproach, a woman, i. e. a coward, poltroon: arbĭtror to make a decision, give judgment or sentence: OR mŭlĭĕro, to make womanish, render effeminate

Boys: -Effemino II.Trop., to make womanish, effeminate, to enervateA.Womanish, effeminate,
II. Trop., to make womanish, effeminate, to enervate: “fortitudinis praecepta
“illa elocutio res ipsas effeminat,” Quint. 8 prooλm. § 20.—
A. Womanish, effeminate (cf.: “mollis, luxuriosus, dissolutus): ne quid effeminatum aut molle sit,” Cic. Off. 1, 35, 129; cf. id. Tusc. 4, 30: “intolerabile est servire impuro, impudico, effeminato,  “furialis illa vox, religiosis altaribus effeminata,” Cic. Planc. 35, 86 —B. In mal. part., that submits to unnatural lust: “pathicus,” Suet. Aug. 68;
Cic. Planc. 35.86 When no one knew what were the feelings of those men who by means of their armies, and their arms, and their riches, were the most powerful men in the state, then that voice, rendered insane by its infamous debaucheries,
    made effeminate by its attendance on holy altars,
     kept crying out in a most ferocious manner
        that both these men
        and the consuls were acting in concert with him.
Needy men were armed against the rich,  abandoned men against the good, slaves against their masters.
--rĕlĭgĭōsus Eccl. Lat., of or belonging to the clergy, clerical (opp. saecularis)

--per-sŏno    A. To sound through and through, to resound: “cum domus cantu et cymbalis personaret,” Cic. Pis. 10, 22: “ut cotidiano cantu vocum et nervorum et tibiarum nocturnisque conviviis tota vicinitas personet,”
A.  To fill with sound or noise, to make resound
B.  To make a sound on a musical instrument, to sound, play: “citharā Iopas Personat,” Verg. A. 1, 741: “cymbalis,” Vulg. 1 Par. 16, 5: “buccinis,” id. Jos. 6, 13
C. To sound or blow upon an instrument (post-class.): “personavit classicum,” gave the signal for attack,
        Histrio, stage-player, actor, mimus, II. Transf., a boaster: “histrionis est parvam rem attollere,”
                
ragoediarum histrionis,  Hilarus comoediarum histrio,
        Scaena, 1. Of a place like a scene of a theatre Verg. A. 1, 164.—, display of eloquence.
           
Isaiah 3:5 And the people shall be oppressed, every one by another, and every one by his neighbour: the child shall behave himself proudly against the ancient, and the base against the honourable.
Tŭmultŭor , Esp. of oratory, to storm, rant, talk at random, etc
Per-turbo “clamore perturbari  confused visions, perverted truths: “reliquos
PROPHECY OF THE BEAST BY CHRIST IN JEREMIAH
And I will appoint over them four kinds, saith the Lord:
        the sword to slay,
        and the dogs to tear,
        and the fowls of the heaven,
        and the beasts of the earth,
        to devour and destroy. Je.15:3

Beast, the Wolves or pederasts Paul warns about or a term of reproach of the "new wineskin worship." Jesus consigned the pipers, singers and dancers to the marketplace because of their vile practices:

-Besta 2.As a term of reproach (cf. belua and our beast): “mala tu es bestia,” Plaut. Bacch. 1, 1, 21; -Pl. Poen. 5.5.—And, humorously, of the odor of the armpits (cf. ala and caper. cappella), Cat. 69, 8
II. Transf., as a constellation, the wotf, Vitr. 9, 4 (7)
cănis (cănes , Plaut. Men. 5, 1, 18; id. Trin. 1, 2, 133;
a. A shameless, vile person, Plaut. Most. 1, 1, 40; Ter. Eun. 4, 7, 33
2. As the regular designation of the hangers-on or parasites of an eminent or rich Roman; a follower, dog, creature:
a. Tergeminus, i. e. Cerberus. Ov. A. A. 3, 322; id. Tr. 4, 7, 16; “called also viperius,” id. Am. 3, 12, 26: “Tartareus,” Sen. Herc. Fur. 649: “triformis,” id. Herc. Oet. 1202: Echidnaea. Ov. M. 7, 409; cf.: “infernae canes,” Hor. S. 1, 8, 35; Verg. A. 6, 257; Luc. 6, 733. ——
Trĭformis , e, adj. ter - forma,
I. having three forms, shapes, or natures; threefold, triple, triform (poet.): “Chimaera,” Hor. C. 1, 27, 23: “canis,” i. e. Cerberus, Sen. Herc. Oet. 1202: “Geryon,” id. Agam. 841:

All pagan god heads were trinitarian.
diva, i. e. Diana, who was also Luna and Hecate, Hor. C. 3, 22, 4; called also triformis dea, Ov. M. 7, 94: “mundus, because composed of air, earth, and water,” id. ib. 15, 859

Speaking in tongues, a baptism of fire and women ruling over you

Pl. Bac. 1.1 Note: Your Bacchanalian den: "Bacchanal" was properly the place where the Bacchanalia,  or orgies, were celebrated. He styles them "Bacchantes," and their house a "Bacchanal," in allusion both to their names and their habits

7 Mischievous serpent: "Mala tu's bestia." Literally, "you are an evil beast;" which sounds harsh to an English ear, even when applied to such an animal as Bacchis.
Baccha  Mainas or Thuias,
I. a Bacchanet, a female attendant of Bacchus, who, in company with Silenus and the Satyrs, celebrated the festival of that deity with a raving madness carried even to insensibility, and with hair loose and flying wildly about, to initiate into the festivals of Bacchus, Mūsa , ae, f., = Mousa, II. mousa, as Appellat., music, song, “m. stugera” A.Eu.308
13 A soft cloak: It was the custom at entertainments for the revellers to exchange their ordinary clothes for fine vestments, elaborately embroidered.

5 A womanish race: "Muliersous" generally means "fond of women." It clearly however, in this passage means "womanish," or "womanlike."

But what went ye out for to see? A man clothed in soft raiment? behold, they that wear soft clothing are in kings houses. Mat 11:8
Matthew 11:16 But whereunto shall I liken this generation? It is like unto children sitting in the markets, and calling unto their fellows,
Matthew 11:17 And saying, We have piped unto you, and ye have not danced; we have mourned unto you, and ye have not lamented. 

Malakos g. of reasoning, weak, loose, logosIsoc.12.logoslian m. Arist.Metaph.1090b8 . Adv. -kτs, sullogizesthai to reason loosely
2. music to which a song is set, tune, logou te kai harmonias kai rhuthmoum
III. of persons or modes of life, soft, mild, gentle, malakōteros amphaphaasthai easier to handle, of a fallen hero, Il.22.373;
c. morally weak, lacking in self-control, Hdt.7.153 (Comp.); “antikeitai m. ho karterikos” Arist.EN1150a33: c. inf., “malakos karterein pros hēdonas te kai lupas” Pl.R.556c; “to truphōn kai m.” Ar.V.1455 (lyr.); not to give in from weakness or want of spirit,   indulgences

2 Peter 2:12 But these, as natural [instinctive] brute [Anti-Logical] brute beasts, [Zoon, Zao, Zoe]
          made to be taken and destroyed,
          speak evil of the things that they understand not;
            [through lack of knowledge]

          and shall utterly perish in their own corruption;
 2 Peter 2.13 receiving the wages of unrighteousness; people who count it pleasure to revel in the day-time, spots and blemishes, reveling in their deceit while they feast with you;

See 2 Peter2 Instrumental Music Marks Corruption
d. = pathētikos, PHib.1.54.11 (iii B.C.), 1 Ep.Cor.6.9, Vett.Val.113.22, D.L.7.173.
e. of music, soft, effeminate, “m. harmoniai” Pl.R.398e, 411a, cf. Arist.Pol.1290a28; tuned to a low pitch, opp. “suntonos, khrōma m.” Cleonid.Harm.7, etc.
9 Use a drum: The priests of Cybele, who were either eunuchs, or persons of effeminate and worthless character, walked in their processions beating a "tympanum." a "drum" or "tambourine." The Captain, by his question, contemptuously implies that Agorastocles is such a character. See the Truer lentus, l. 608, and the Note
cănis
“canem inritatam imitarier,” Plaut. Capt. 3, 1, 25:
Verg. A. 3.374
that shapeless Scylla in her vaulted cave,
where grim rocks echo her dark sea-dogs' roar.
Yea, more, if aught of prescience be bestowed
on Helenus, if trusted prophet he,
and Phoebus to his heart true voice have given,
o goddess-born, one counsel chief of all
I tell thee oft, and urge it o'er and o'er.
To Juno's godhead lift thy Ioudest prayer;
to Juno chant a fervent votive song,
and with obedient offering persuade
that potent Queen. So shalt thou, triumphing,
to Italy be sped, and leave behind
Trinacria.
rĕ-sŏno  to send forth a roaring noiseB. [select] Trop., to resound, re-echo: “in vocibus nostrorum oratorum
“(sonus) in fidibus testudine resonatur aut cornu,” Cic. N. D. 2, 57, 144. — Poet., with acc. of a place, to make resound or re-echo: “ubi Solis filia lucos Assiduo resonat cantu,” Verg. A. 7, 

lŭpus  Plin. 8, 22, 34, § 80.—Prov.: lupus in fabulā or sermone, said of the appearance of a person when he is spoken of; as we say in English, talk of the devil, and he appears: “
Lupus observavit, dum dormitaret canes, of one who watches his opportunity to be unobserved, Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 133

CHURCH IS A SAFE HOUSE TO HIDE FROM THE BEASTS

Jer 15:16 Thy words were found,
        and I did eat them; and

        thy word was unto me the joy

        and rejoicing of mine heart

              for (because) I am called by thy name, O Lord God of hosts.

The Word was Christ's joy or gaudĭum  was inward joy, joy, gladness, delight ratione (rational Logos) and  dicitur (spoken)

This was OPPOSITE of laetĭtĭa , I. joy, esp. unrestrained joyfulness, gladness, pleasure, delight (cf.: gaudium, hilaritas), another outbreak of joy. Of speech, sweetness, grace: “laetitia et pulcritudo orationis, Bacchus,,” to be transported with joy,

IN the -membrum , Not in the members of the human body:

Jeremiah 4.4[4]  Circumcise yourselves to Yahweh, and take away the foreskins of your heart, you men of Judah and inhabitants of Jerusalem; lest my wrath go forth like fire, and burn so that none can quench it, because of the evil of your doings.
1Cor. 4:5 Therefore judge nothing before the time, until the Lord come, who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels of the hearts: and then shall every man have praise of God.

But 4. Of the Church of Christ: “singuli autem alter alterius membra,” Vulg. Rom. 12, 5; cf. “the context: membra sumus corporis ejus,” i. e. Christ's, id. Eph. 5, 30.

WORSHIP SAYS JESUS AND THE SINFUL WOMAN UNDERSTOOD IS IN THE PLACE OF THE HUMAN HEART OR SPIRIT DEVOTED SOLELY TO TRUTH OR THE WORD OF CHRIST.

Romans 12:1
I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that YE present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God,  which is your reasonable service.

Peter and Paul always demand sacrificinng or "burrning up" the fleshly nature. Then, our spirit is ready to engage in worship which can NEVER include music.
 
         tēn logikēn latreian humōn:
         Rătĭōnābĭlis , e, adj. ratio (post-Aug.; = rationalis, which is in better use),
          I. reasonable, rational: he pure milk of reason, id.
        1 Pet. 2, 2: “sententia vera et rationabilis,”

Romans 12:2 And be not conformed to this world:  but be ye transformed (metamorph-oō ) by the renewing of your mind,
        that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable,
        and perfect, will of God.
Romans 12.[5] so we, who are many, are one body in Christ, and individually members one of another.
IN THE HEART  Cor feeling (poet.): “videas corde amare inter se,” from the heart, cordially,
b.  Cordi est alicui, it lies at one's heart, it pleases, is pleasing, agreeable, or dear:
B. (cf. Cic. Tusc. 1, 9, 18) as the seat of wisdom, understanding, heart, mind, judgment,

PETER'S CLEAR DEFINITION OF THE SOLE ROLE OF THE ASSEMBLY

But the word of the Lord endureth for ever.
And this is the word which by the gospel [
euaggel-izomai] ,is preached unto you. 1 Peter 1:25

WHEREFORE laying aside all malice, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil speakings, 1 Peter 2:1

hupo-kri^sis  playing a part on the stage an orator's delivery,
rhētores orators who depend on their delivery, opp. to the authors of written speeches, playing a part, hypocrisy, outward show,
As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby: 1 Peter 2:2
logi^k-os , ē, on, (logos) the organs of speech, Plu.Cor.38: logikē, , speech, Opposite. mousikē, D.H. Comp. 11; “l. phantasia” expressed in speech, suited for prose
possessed of reason, intellectual, “meros” 
logical, l. sullogismoi, Opposite. rhētorikoi,

phu^sikos II. of or concerning the order of external nature, natural,    
III. later, belonging to occult laws of nature, magical, ph. pharmaka spells or amulets,
        physical, Opposite. mathēmatikē, theologikē,
pharma^kon
such charms have I, Hdt.3.85, cf. Apoc.9.21.

epōdē A. [select] song sung to or over: hence, enchantment, spell, “epaoidē  , “oute pharmaka..oud' au epōdai” sophou thrēnein epōdas
sophos , ē, on, A. skilled in any handicraft or art, clever, “mantis” of Apollo and Cassandra, of the Pythian priestess, Margites Fr.2; but in this sense mostly of poets and musicians, Pi.O.1.9, P.1.42, 3.113; en kithara s. E.IT1238 (lyr.)
Revelation 9:[21] They didn't repent of their murders, nor of their sorceries, nor of their sexual immorality, nor of their thefts.
porn-eia , prostitution, Hp.Epid.7.122, etc.; of a man, D.19.200; Idolatry
Dem. 19 200 then the junior clerk, doing the dirty work of public offices for a few shillings a month: and at last, not so long ago, the parasite of the greenrooms, eking out by sponging what you earned as a player of trumpery parts! What is the life you will claim, and where have you lived it, when such is too clearly the sort of life you really have lived? And then the assurance of the man! Bringing another man1 before this court on a charge of unnatural crime! However, I will let that go for the present. First read these depositions.“ Depositions ”
Revelation 18.[23] The light of a lamp will shine no more at all in you. The voice of the bridegroom and of the bride will be heard no more at all in you; for your merchants were the princes of the earth; for with your sorcery all the nations were deceived.

vĕnēfĭcĭum , “idque veneficiis et cantionibus Titiniae factum esse dicebat,
cantĭo , ōnis, f. cano, lit. a singing, playing;
Plaut. Stich. 5, 4, 25;
II. An incantation, charm, spell, Cato, R. R. 160: “subito totam causam oblitus est, idque veneficiis et cantionibus Titiniae factum dicebat,” Cic. Brut. 60, 217;

Pl. St. 5.4 SAGARINUS
You say right; I care for no dainties. Drink away, Piper; drink, if you do drink. I' faith, this must be drunk--don't shirk it. Holds the goblet to the PIPER. Why flinch at what you see must be done by you? Why don't you drink? Do it, if you are to do it. Take it, I tell you, for the public pays for this. That's not your way to shirk your drink. Take your pipes out of your mouth. The PIPER drinks.

14 Take your pipes: The "Tibicines," "Pipers" or "flute-players," among the Greeks and Romans, were in the habit of playing upon two pipes at the same time. These were perfectly distinct, and were not even, as has been supposed by some, connected by a common mouth-piece. The Romans were particularly fond of this music, and it was introduced both at sacrifices, funerals, and entertainments. See a comical story about the Roman "Tibicines" in the Fasti of Ovid, B. 6, l. 670 et seq. From the present specimen they appear to have been merry souls, occupying much the same place as the country fiddlers of modern times.

Paus. 5.18 Two other women are pounding in mortars with pestles; they are supposed to be wise in medicine-lore, though there is no inscription to them....There are also figures of Muses singing, with Apollo [Abaddon, Apollyon] leading the song; these too have an inscription:—“This is Leto's son, prince Apollo, far-shooting;Around him are the Muses, a graceful choir, whom he is leading.

1 Peter 2:3 If so be ye have tasted that the Lord is gracious

1 Peter 2:4 To whom coming, as unto a living stone, disallowed indeed of men, but chosen of God, and precious, 

1 Peter 2:5 Ye also, as lively stones, are built up a spiritual house,
        an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, [the fruit of the LIPS]
       
acceptable to God by Jesus Christ. 

AND CHRIST SUPPLIES ALL OF THE FRUITS

Isa 57:18 I have seen his ways, and will heal him: 
        I will lead him also, and restore comforts unto him and to his mourners.

Isa 57:19 I create the fruit of the lips; 
        Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the Lord; and I will heal him.

THE UNIVERSAL MEANING
Psa 119:107 I am afflicted very much:
        quicken me, O Lord, according unto thy word.

Psa 119:108 Accept, I beseech thee,
        The freewill offerings of my mouth,
        O Lord, and teach me thy judgments.

Hebrews 13:13 Let us go forth therefore unto him
        without the camp, bearing his reproach.

Hebrews 13:14 For here have we no continuing city,
        but we seek one to come.

Hebrews 13:15 By him therefore
        let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually
,

        that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name. \
Hebrews 13:16 But to do good and to communicate forget not:
        for with such sacrifices God is well pleased.
Hebrews 13:22 And I beseech you, brethren,
        suffer the word of exhortation
:

        for I have written a letter unto you in few words.
Psa 119:109 My soul is continually in my hand:
        yet do I not forget thy law.

Psa 119:147 I prevented the dawning of the morning, and cried:
        I hoped in thy word.

Psa 119:148 Mine eyes prevent the night watches,
        that I might meditate in thy word.

Psa 119:149 Hear my voice according unto thy lovingkindness:
        O Lord, quicken me according to thy judgment.

Psa 119:170 Let my supplication come before thee:
        deliver me according to thy word.

Psa 119:171 My lips shall utter praise,
       
when thou hast taught me thy statutes.

Psa 119:172 My tongue shall speak of thy word:
        for all thy commandments are righteousness.

Isaiah 57:20 But the wicked are like the troubled sea,
        when it cannot rest, whose waters cast up mire and dirt.

Isaiah 57:20] impii autem quasi mare fervens quod quiescere non potest et redundant fluctus eius in conculcationem et lutum
Quĭesco ,
“quiērunt Aequora,” the waves are at rest, do not rise, standing waters,
2.  Act., to cause to cease, render quiet, stop, etc.: “laudes,” Sen. Herc. Oet. 1584.—Hence, quĭētus , a, um, P. a., at rest, calm, quiet
4. To make a pause in speaking: quiescere, id est, hēsukhazein, “ludendi est quidem modus
Silence: lūdo , B. To play, sport, frisk, frolic: “dum se exornat, nos volo Ludere inter nos,” have some fun, dance,
Silence:  A. go sport, play with any thing, to practise as a pastime, amuse one's self with any thing “carmina pastorum,
Silence: B.  to sport, dally, wanton (cf. "amorous play," Milton, P. L. 9, 1045): “scis solere illam aetatem tali ludo ludere,” Plaut. Most. 5,
Silence: C. Ludere aliquem or aliquid, to play, mock, imitate, mimic a person or thing imitate work, make believe work, 
Mŏdus 2. The measure of tones, measure, rhythm, melody, harmony, time; in poetry, measure, metre, mode: “vocum,” Cic. Div. 2, 3, 9: “musici,” Quint. 1, 10, 14: “lyrici,” Ov. H. 15, 6: “fidibus Latinis Thebanos aptare modos,” Hor. Ep. 1, 3, 12: Bacchico exsultas (i. e. exsultans) modo, Enn. ap. Charis [grace]. p. 214 P. (Trag. v. 152 Vahl.): “flebilibus modis concinere,” Cic. Tusc. 1, 44, 106: saltare [dance] ad tibicinis modos, to the music or sound of the flute, Liv. 7, 2: “nectere canoris Eloquium vocale modis,” Juv. 7, 19.—Fig.: “verae 

Isaiah 57:21 There is no peace, saith my God, to the wicked.

pax , I.  peace, concluded between parties at variance, esp. between belligerents; a treaty of peace; tranquillity, the absence of war, amity, reconciliation after a quarrel, public or private
B. 
Transf.
1. Grace, favor, pardon, assistance of the gods: “pacem ab Aesculapio petas,
4. [select] Peace in the church, harmony (eccl. Lat.): “quamdiu pax est in populo Dei 4. Pax, as an interj., peace! silence! enough! pax,  peace, rest, quiet, ease.
4. Peace in the church, harmony (eccl. Lat.): “quamdiu pax est in populo Dei

They DO it because they ARE impious impĭus without reverence or respect for God, one's parents, or one's country; irreverent, ungodly, undutiful, unpatriotic; abandoned, wicked, impious
Tītan  g). Diana, as sister of Sol, Ov. M. 3, 173
(d). Circe, [CHURCH] as daughter of Sol. Ov. M. 14, 382; 14, 438. — thunderbolts of his son Jupiter, precipitated into Tartarus:
B. Tītānĭăcus , a, um, adj., of or belonging to Titan or the Titans, Titanic: dracones, sprung from the Titans' blood, Ov. M. 7, 398. —
C. Tītānis , ĭdis or ĭdos, adj. f., Titanic: “pugna,” of the Titans, Juv. 8, 132: “Circe, as daughter of Sol,

CHRIST IN JEREMIAH 15 IS PARALLEL TO EPHESIANS 5

Jer 15:16 Thy words were found,
and I did eat them; and
thy WORD was unto me the joy
sermo prose as opposed to poetry, verba inculcantes   to impress
Verba
translation of logos,

Eph. 5:17 Wherefore be ye not unwise,
      but understanding what the WILL of the Lord is.
Eph. 5:19
Speaking [
lŏquor tone of conversation]
to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs,
logos
, Vulg. Joan. 1, 1; id. 1 Joan. 5, 7; id. Apoc. 19, 13. [Opposite of poetry or music]

and rejoicing [ludo]
of mine heart: [Cor, Corde
singing and making melody
      IN your heart to the Lord
;
for I am called by thy name,

O Lord God
of hosts. [not starry host]
Eph. 5:20 Giving thanks always for all things unto God and the Father
 
in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ
Jer 15:17 I sat not
in the assembly [to procure favor]
of the mockers,
      [
to play on an instrument of music, to make or compose music or song:]

nor rejoiced; [boast, take glory]
Eph. 5:6 Let no man deceive [Wholly Seduce: Eve]
you with vain words:

for because of these things cometh the
wrath [orgy] of God upon the children of disobedience. [Apistos: refused to be baptized]

Eph. 5:7 Be not ye therefore
partakers [synagogue-church] with them.
I sat alone because of thy hand:
for thou hast filled me with indignation.
Eph. 5:8 For ye were sometimes darkness, but now are ye light in the Lord: walk as children of light:
Jeremiah 15:18 Why is my pain perpetual, and my wound incurable, [plaga]

which refuseth to be healed? wilt thou be altogether unto me as a liar,


Mendacium
lie, untruth, falsehood, a fable, fiction opposite historic truth Poet a maker, contriver, trickster, scenā performer  oratores  versĭfĭcātor ,

and as waters that fail?

in-fĭdēlĭter
, faithlessly, perfidiously, infidel, NOT “Christiani,
Eph. 5:9 (For the fruit of the Spirit is in all goodness and righteousness and truth;)
Eph 5:10 Proving
[inspect, judge] what is acceptable unto the Lord.
Ephesians 5:11 And have no fellowship
[share]
with the unfruitful works [cultūra , 2. Of religious worship]
of darkness, [tĕnē^brae  “occultare et dissimulare appetitum   
          voluptatis,
” măgus carmen [music] artes [craftsman]

but rather reprove them.
Rĕd-argŭo  to disprove, refute, confute, contradict

Ephesians 5:12 For it is a shame
turpis  effeminato viro [semen] -lĭgo to bind to external things
even to speak of those things which are done of them in secret. occŭlo
THE RISE OF THE  BEAST IN THE BOOK OF REVELATION: END-TIME FULFILLMENT

Paul said that the liberated Jews worshipped in the SPIRIT in contrast to in the FLESH.  This was to forbid the dogs or concision: catamites.

For we are the circumcision, which worship God in the spirit, and rejoice in Christ Jesus, and have no confidence in the flesh. Phil 3:3
Beware of dogs, beware of evil workers, beware of the concision. Phil 3:2

The pagan THESIS included women worshipping goddesses and seducing men by wine, drugs, motion or music. The object was to strip them of their food money.  The Spirit of Christ in Isaiah 50 prophesied against those who would Smite Him and Pluck in a musical sense to silence Him and therefore MOCK Him.

in Isaiah 55 warned us NOT to spend our food money on the Word which He supplied free of charge.  He equated His WORDS to SPIRIT. 

In Isaiah 58 He commanded us not to seek our own pleasure or even speak our own words. He warned against PARASITES trying to get into the act: all sacrificial musicians were called PARASITES.

History notes that only women and effeminate men can be seduced by religious money: a male who plays and sings is noted to be "drunk, gender-confused or just having fun."

Dogs were the CYNICS they stamped, clapped and made noises like DOGS to attract their fellow homosexuals.

-kuōn  II. as a word of reproach, freq. in Hom. of women, to denote shamelessness or audacity; applied by Helen to herself, Il.6.344, 356; by Iris to Athena, 8.423 rhapsōdos k. implying recklessness,
Pan is the kuōn of Cybele, Pi.Fr.96: Pythag., Persephonēs kunes, of the planets, Arist. Fr.196: so Com., Hēphaistou k., of sparks, Hecate, in Mithraic worship, Porph.Abst.4.16; of the “Bakkhai, Lussas k.” E.Ba.977 (lyr.); Lernas k., of the hydra, Id.HF420

Matthew 7:6 Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you.

Pan [beast]  is the kuōn of Cybele Persephonēs kunes, of the planets
of Hecate, in Mithraic worship of the “Bakkhai, Lussas k.” E.Ba.977 (lyr.

3. of the Cynics, “areskei  self-pleasure Rom 15  toutois kunōn metamphiennusthai bion”
also of offensive persons, compared to yapping dogs, LXX Ps.21(22).17, Ep.Phil.3.2;

Romans 15:1 We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please [areskō] ourselves. [plăcĕo LATIN
Areskō modi, appease, conciliateplease, satisfy, —Med., malista ēreskonto <hoi> hoi ap' Athēneōn pleased him most, Hdt.6.128. please, “ei toi areskei ta egō legō
IV. areskei is used impers. to express the opinion or resolution of a public bodY
ta areskonta the dogmas of philosophers, Plu.2.448a,

Plăcĕo 
1.In scenic lang., of players or pieces presented, to please, find favor, give satisfaction: “primo actu placeo, Ter. Hec. prol. alt. 31: cui scenico placenti,” Suet. Ner. 42; id. Galb. 12; id. Vit. 11: “populo ut placerent quas fecisset fabulas,” Ter. And. prol. 3; “id. Hec. prol. alt. 12: ubi (fabulae) sunt cognitae, Placitae sunt,
philosophiae placita, id. ib. § “37: Babyloniorum,” Plin. 2, 79, 81, § 191; Col. 9, 2, 1.
Fabula 1. Most freq., a dramatic poem, drama, play (syn.: “ludus, cantus, actio, etc.): in full, fabula scaenica,” Amm. 28, 1, 4; “or, theatralis,” id. 14, 6, 20: “fabula ad actum scenarum composita,”
Romans 15:2 Let every one of us please his neighbour for his good to edification.

Aedĭfĭcātĭo ,
III. Fig., building up, instructing, edification.
(a). Absol.: “loquitur ad aedificationem,” Vulg. 1 Cor. 14, 3; 14, 26.—
(b). With gen.: “ad aedificationem Ecclesiae,” Vulg. 1 Cor. 14, 12; ib. Eph. 4, 12.

oikodom-eō
book Ephesians, chapter 4: ... pros ton katartismon tōn hagiōn eis ergon diakonias, eis oikodomēn tou sōmatos tou khristou, mekhri katantēsōmen hoi pantes ... metrō henos hekastou merous tēn auxēsin tou sōmatos poieitai eis oikodomēn heautou en agapē. Touto oun legō kai... tou stomatos humōn ekporeuesthō, alla ei tis agathos pros oikodomēn tēs khreias, hina kharin tois akouousin. kai

Ephesiahs 4.[12] for the perfecting of the saints, to the work of serving, to the building up of the body of Christ; [13] until we all attain to the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to a full grown man, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ; [14] that we may no longer be children, tossed back and forth and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the trickery of men, in craftiness, after the wiles of error; [15] but speaking truth in love, we may grow up in all things into him, who is the head, Christ; [16] from whom all the body, being fitted and knit together through that which every joint supplies, according to the working in measure of each individual part, makes the body increase to the building up of itself in love. [

Romans 15:3 For even Christ pleased not himself; but, as it is written,
        The reproaches of them that reproached thee fell on me.
Romans 15:4 For whatsoever things were written aforetime
        were written for our learning,

        that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope.
Rom. 15:5 Now the God of patience and consolation grant you to be likeminded one toward another according to Christ Jesus:
Rom. 15:6 That ye may with one mind and one mouth glorify God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.

The Beast: thēreutēs deinos. “A mighty hunter,” a very Nimrod. For the notion of the chase in erotics, cp. the use of helein and diōkein in 182 E, etc., and of thēra in Soph. 222 D tōn erōntōn thēra (cp. thērōmai in Isocr. Hel. 219 D): 

MUSICAL WORSHIP WITH WOMEN OR THE EFFEMINATE IS THE MARK OF THE BEAST
Thērion , to (in form Dim. of thēr),
A. wild animal, esp. of such as are hunted, mala gar mega thērion ēen, of a stag, Od.10.171, 180 (never in Il.); in Trag. only in Satyric drama,  “ mousikē aei ti kainon thērion tiktei” 

a tragedy in Satyric Drama. In Athens adapting old dithyramb with its chorus of Satyrs, The intensity of the preceding plays was thus relieved, while the chorus of Satyrs and Sileni, the companions of Dionysus, served to indicate the original connection between that divinity and the drama. The dance of the chorus in the satyric drama was called sikinnis or sikinnon, and consisted of a fantastic kind of skipping and jumping
-Satyric Drama
The material for a satyric drama, like that for a tragedy, was taken from an epic or legendary story, and the action, which took place under an open sky, in a lonely wood, the haunt of the Satyrs, had generally an element of tragedy; but the characteristic solemnity and stateliness of tragedies was somewhat diminished, without in any way impairing the splendour of the tragic costume and the dignity of the heroes introduced. The amusing effect of the play did not depend so much on the action itself, as was the case in comedy, but rather on the relation of the chorus to that action. That relation was in keeping with the wanton, saucy, and insolent, and at the same time cowardly, nature of the Satyrs. The number of persons in the chorus is not known; probably there were either twelve or fifteen, as in tragedy. In accordance with the popular notions about the Satyrs, their costume consisted of the skin of a goat, deer, or panther, thrown over the naked body, and besides this a hideous mask and bristling hair. The dance of the chorus in the satyric drama was called sikinnis or sikinnon, and consisted of a fantastic kind of skipping and jumping. The only satyric play now extant is the Cyclops of Euripides (translated into English by Shelley), though the Alcestis of the same poet has some satyric features. The Romans did not imitate this kind of drama in their literature (Marius Victor, in Gram. Lat. vi. 82), although, like the Greeks, they composed amusing afterpieces following their serious plays. See Welcker, Griech. Tragφdie, 1361; and Exodium.

sikinn-i^s si^or siki_nis (E.Cyc.37), idos, , acc. A. [select] “Sikinnin” D.H.7.72Sicinnis, a dance of Satyrs used in the Satyric drama, S.Fr.772, E. l.c., D.H. l.c., Luc.Salt.22: named from its inventor Sicinnus, Ath.1.20e, cf. Scamon 1; or from Sicinnis, a nymph of Cybele, although originally danced in honour of Sabazios, Arr.Fr.106J.— Also written Sikinnon , to, Suid.; Sikinna

Saltatioorkhēsis, khoreusis). Dancing...All these movements, however, were accompanied by music; but the terms orkhēsis and saltatio were used in so much wider a sense than our word dancing that they were applied to designate gestures even when the body did not move at all (saltare solis oculis, Ov. Met. x. p. 251).

The Dionysiac or Bacchic and the Corybantian were of a very different nature. In the former, the life and adventures of the god were represented by mimetic dancing (see Dionysia); the dance called Bakkhikē was a satyric dance, and chiefly prevailed in Ionia and Pontus; the most illustrious men in the State danced in it, representing Titans, Corybantians, satyrs, and husbandmen, and the spectators were so delighted with the exhibition that they remained sitting the whole day to witness it, forgetful of everything else

G2342 thērion thay-ree'-on Diminutive from the same as G2339 ; a dangerous animal:—(venomous, wild) beast.
G2339 thēra thay'-rah From θήρ thēr (a wild animal, as game); hunting, that is, (figuratively) destruction:—trap.Hunting legend
The beast is A new style of song, music or drama.

mousikκ aei ti kainon thκrion tiktei

A.  Mousikos, musical, agτnes m. kai gumnikoi  choroi te kai agτnes ta mousika music
II. of persons, skilled in music, musical, X.l.c., etc.; poiκtikoi kai m. andres Pl.Lg.802b ;
kuknos [minstrel]  kai alla zτia; peri aulous - professional musicians, mousikos kai melτn poκtκs, use with singing, skilled in speaking before a mob. Melody, 

B. aei always
C. kainos , esp. of new dramas, the representation of the new tragedies,  (Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite (ZOE); comedy, sexual love, pleasure, a woman's form of oath, Aster or Venus or ZOE.
Therion
D. Tikto mostly of the mother 
E. of Rhea one of the zoogonic or vivific principles

Rev. 17:3 So he carried me away in the spirit into the wilderness: and I saw a woman sit upon a scarlet coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns.

thκraτ 1. to hunt or chase wild beasts,

OF A POISONOUS ANIMAL

Echidn-a , hκ, ( [echis] ) viper, Hdt.3.108, S.Tr.771, Pl.Smp.218a, etc.; prob. of a constrictor snake, Act.Ap.28.3: metaph., of a treacherous wife or friend, A.Ch.249, S.Ant.531; himatismenκ e., of woman, Secund.Sent.8; gennκmata echidnτn brood of vipers, term of reproach, in Ev.Matt.3.7.

Echis skorpios κrkτs to kentron ib.52; cf. echidna. 

Skorpi-os , ho, scorpion, A.Fr.169, Pl.Euthd.290a, Sammelb.1267.7 (i A.D.), etc.; s. ho chersaios (v. infr. 11) Arist.HA555a23: prov., hupo panti lithτi skorpion phulasseo Praxill.4 ; en panti s. phrourei lithτi S. Fr.37 ; also skorpion oktτpoun egeireis 'let sleeping dogs lie', Hsch.; hτsper echis κ s. κrkτs to kentron

METAPHOR OF A ORATOR,
Enthithemi  stir up wrath, inspire fear, stored up wrath in the heart, inspire fear

with Chorde or string of a lyre or harp, a musical note. Hard work and practice to atain harmony on a harp or flute.
Harmonia. music in stringing a bow or lyre, musical scale, generally music
Qahal, Ekklesia, Synagogue, Church of Christ is defined as A School (only) of the Word (only) of Christ (only) and is built upon or EDUCATED by the Prophets and Apostles. 
  Again: They are substituted for the Bible, and tend to prevent free discussion. They are good for nothing unless used--and if used, they must be used as laws, or rules, or standards of doctrine. And if used in any of these ways, they are substituted for the Book of Christ left for the same purpose. They are used as a synopsis of religious truth, and save the trouble of searching the whole Bible for it.

        Every church should be a theological school, and all the members should be students. It does no good for the minister to preach unless the people think. The church should be all awake, and engaged in discussion, and then [140] they would be prepared to be benefitted by the public labors of the minister.

    If we would engage to build up, and not content ourselves with tearing down, we should do more. It will do no good to cry out against sectarianism.

        There are warm-hearted, conscientious Christians in the sects; and if we will go on and do the work they love to see done better than they can do it in their own way, they will fall in; and before we are aware, the great sects will be gone. The labor of the church is to persuade men to turn to Christ; and let us go out into the highways and hedges, and labor and build up; and sectarianism will dissolve away like the dew. MILLENNIAL HARBINGER, NEW SERIES. VOLUME III. NUMBER III.B E T H A N Y, VA. MARCH, 1839.
Jesus commanded the only role as the Evangelists who was to GO into the world and teach and disciple by Baptism and Teaching what Jesus commanded to be taught. Jesus did not command a worship service and said that the Kingdom of God is within us and does not come or cannot be observed by religious observations other than assemblying to LEARN OF ME says Jesus. To that He added the Lord's Supper as a visual aid to remember His death. If we grasp that Jesus died to be our ONLY mediator in song or sermon then we gracefully sit down and shut up and observe the PATTERN for the church. Both Jews and Gentiles were wise unto salvation because.

Acts 15:21 For Moses of old time
        hath in every city
        them that PREACH him,
        being READ in the synagogues every sabbath day.

That was the pattern before the Syriacs added singing as an ACT in 373 as a way to tell Bible Stories in the form of Cantillation which is not metrical and cannot be sung or played.

Ephesians 2:20 And are built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner stone;
Ephesians 3:5 Which in other ages was not made known unto the sons of men, as it is now revealed unto his holy apostles and prophets by the Spirit;

There is no Biblical command, example or inference that any of God's disciple's ever left their REST for congregational singing with out without instruments. In fact the Qahal, synagogue, Ekklesia or Church of Christ (the Rock) in the wilderness is clearly defined:

INCLUSIVE of Rest, Reading and Rehearsing the Word of Go
EXCLUSIVE of vocal or instrumental rejoicing or performance speaking

The Synagogue of Christ never changed: removing the burden of the sacrificial system enable liberty for people to reject religious ceremonial and simply learn the Word of God as it was made known.

John Calvin who called for A Restoration of the Church of Christ understood the text. Restoration simply meant ELEMENTING the burdensome superstitions which had been heaped onto the church.

The Levites were not as claimed "Musical Worship leaders with Instruments." In fact the command of God was that the stand in ranks with swords and make a great noise of prophesying which is "soothsaying" or "sorcery" since they were not prophets. They would EXECUTE any godly person or even a Levite not on rare duty if they came near the sacrificial system or holocause or into any covered house. Christ in the prophets said that God did NOT command the Civil-Military-Clergy complex and called them robbers and parasites. A parasite in the sacrificial systems was made loud instrumental noise "to make the lambs dumb before the slaughter."

This was a "covenant with death and hell" by which the Jews believed that they could prevent the Spiritual God from noticing them and would protect them from evil forces.

That Covenant with Death or Shadow was annuled to make spiritual freedom possible FROM rhetoricians, singers, instrument players and tithe collectors.

The gospel good news of freedom FROM the World is:

THE PROPHECY OF MESSIAH BY THE SPIRIT OF CHRIST

Malachi 3 Prophecy of baptism of WIND and Fire on those who used magical means (rhetoric, singing, instruments) to rob the people.  The warning about tithing is to the PRIESTS.
Malachi 4 defines the "baptism" of Spirit (Wind) and Fire for this Viper Race.
Ken Cukrowski, Mark Hamilton God's Holy Firec

Malachi 3:1 “Behold, I send my messenger, and he will prepare the way before me;
        and the Lord, whom you seek, will suddenly come to his temple;
        and the messenger of the covenant, whom you desire, behold, he comes!” says Yahweh of hosts.
Templum , 1. An open, clear, broad space, a circuit (so rare and mostly poet.): unus erit, quem tu tolles in caerula caeli Templa, i. e. the space or circuit of the heavens,
—Of the hollow space or chamber of the mouth:

Testāmentum , i, n. testor,
I. the publication of a last will or testament; a will, testament (cf. codicilli).
the laws relating to wills in ge
Malachi 3:2 “But who can endure the day of his coming?
        And who will stand when he appears?
        For he is like a refiner’s fire, and like launderer’s soap;
Con-flo , āvi, ātum, 1,
I. v. a., to blow together, to blow up, stir up.
1. Of the passions, to kindle, inflame: “conflatus amore Ignis,” Lucr. 1, 474: “invidiam inimico,” Cic. Cat. 1, 9, 23; id. Cael. 12, 29; Sall. C. 49, 4: “conjurationem,” Suet. Ner. 36: cf.: “ingens ac terribile bellum,”
Ignis
A. (Mostly poet.) The fire or glow of passion, in a good or bad sense; of anger, rage, fury:
“laurigerosque ignes, si quando avidissimus hauri,” raving, inspiration, Stat. Ach. 1, 509: “quae simul aethereos animo conceperat ignes, ore dabat pleno carmina vera dei,” Ov. F. 1, 473: “(Dido) caeco carpitur igni,”
B. Figuratively of that which brings destruction, fire, flame:
Fullo , ōnis, m.
I.  A fuller, cloth-fuller, Plaut. Aul. 3, 5, 34; Plin. 28, 6, 18, § 66; Mart. 6, 93, 1; Dig. 12, 7, 2; Gai. Inst. 3, 143; 162 al.—In mal. part.: comprimere fullonem, Nov. ap. Prisc. p. 879 P. (Com. Rel. v. 95 Rib.); “hence: pugil Cleomachus intra cutem caesus et ultra, inter fullones Novianos coronandus,”
The scourer: The "fullo" was a washer and cleaner of linen and woollen clothing with fuller's earth. As woollen dresses were chiefly worn by the Romans, they would, by reason of the perspiration produced by so hot a climate, require frequent purification. As the ancients, probably, were not acquainted with the use of ordinary washing soap, various alkalis were used in its place for the purpose of cleansing garments. It is not known whether the fuller's earth of the Romans resembled that used at the present day.
Malachi 3:3 and he will sit as a refiner and purifier of silver,
        and he will purify the sons of Levi, and refine them as gold and silver;
        and they shall offer to Yahweh offerings in righteousness.
Purgo  1. To make even by clearing away, (A good conscience)
1.
To clear from accusation, to excuse, exculpate, justify
2. To cleanse or purge from a crime or sin with religious rites, to make expiation or atonement for, to expiate, purify, atone for, lustrate, = expiare, lustrare
Luke 3:2 Annas and Caiaphas being the high priests,
        the word of God came unto John the son of Zacharias in the wilderness.
Luke 3:3 And he came into all the country about Jordan,
        preaching the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins;

Luke 3:7 Then said he to the multitude that came forth to be baptized of him,
        O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come?
Ekhidn-a , , (ekhis) A. viper, Hdt.3.108, S.Tr.771, Pl.Smp.218a, etc.; prob. of a constrictor snake, Act.Ap.28.3: metaph., of a treacherous wife or friend, A.Ch.249, S.Ant.531; himatismenē e., of woman, Secund.Sent.8; gennēmata ekhidnōn brood of vipers, term of reproach, in Ev.Matt.3.7.

Plat. Sym. 218a to describe his sensations to any but persons who had been bitten themselves, since they alone would understand him and stand up for him if he should give way to wild words and actions in his agony. Now I have been bitten by a more painful creature, in the most painful way that one can be bitten: in my heart, or my soul, or whatever one is to call it,
        I am stricken and stung by his philosophic discourses,
        which adhere more fiercely than any adder
        when once they lay hold of a young and not ungifted soul,
        and force it to do or say whatever they will;
I have only to look around me, and there is a Phaedrus, an Agathon, an Eryximachus,
Vipera term of reproach for a dangerous person B. Viper! serpent! as a term of reproach for a dangerous person “saevissima,” Juv. 6, 641: “tandem, vipera, sibilare desiste,” Flor. 4, 12, 37; cf. Don. Ter. Eun. 5, 1, 8.: Sibilo
Saevus aroused to fierceness (while ferus signifies naturally fierce); raging, furious, fell, savage, ferocious, etc

Passionate excitement, Cānĭdĭa, sorceress, often mentioned by Horace, Hor. Epod. 3, 8; id. S. 1, 8, 24Cŭpīdo  2. Personified:
Cŭpīdo , ĭnis, m., the god of love, Cupid, son of Venus [LUCIFER, ZOE], tympana, sounding harshly or terribly Avarice, covetousness: “Narcissum incusat cupidinis ac praedarum,” Tac. A. 12, 57; in plur., id. H. 1, 66.—* 2. Personified: “Cupido sordidus,” sordid Avarice, Hor. C. 2, 16, 15.
Sibilo I. Neutr., to hiss, to whistle: “stridor rudentum sibilat,” whistles,  “so of a serpent,” Prop. 4 (5), 7, 54. applaud

Verg. A. 11.754

Not slackly do ye join
the ranks of Venus in a midnight war;
or when fantastic pipes of Bacchus call
your dancing feet, right venturesome ye fly
to banquets and the flowing wine—what zeal,
what ardor then! Or if your flattering priest
begins the revel, and to Iofty groves
fat flesh of victims bids ye haste away!”

Malachi 3:4 Then the offering of Judah and Jerusalem will be pleasant to Yahweh,
         as in the days of old, and as in ancient years.

Malachi 3:5 I will come near to you to judgment;
        and I will be a swift witness against the sorcerers,
        and against the adulterers, and against the perjurers,
        and against those who oppress the hireling in his wages, the widow, and the fatherless,
        and who deprive the foreigner of justice, and don’t fear me,” says Yahweh of Hosts.

-Mălĕfĭcĭum , ĭi, n. maleficus,
1. Fraud, deception, adulteration: “me maleficio vinceres?” Plaut. Truc. 2, 6, 20 Speng.; Quint. 7, 4, 36; Plin. 12, 25, 54, § 1202. Enchantment, sorcery, Tac. A. 2, 69 Orell. N. cr.; App. M. 9, p. 230, 24; 231, 28; cf. “magica,” id. Mag. p. 278, 21; Schol. Juv. 6, 595
Măgĭcus , a, um, adj., = μαγικός,
I. of or belonging to magic, magic, magical (poet. and in post-Aug. prose): “artes,” Verg. A. 4, 493: “magicis auxiliis uti,” Tib. 1, 8, 24: “arma movere,” Ov. M. 5, 197: “superstitiones,” Tac. A. 12, 59: “vanitates,” Plin. 30, 1, 1, § 1: “herbae,” id. 24, 17, 99, § 156: “aquae,” Prop. 4, 1, 102 (5, 1, 106): di magici, that were invoked by incantations (as Pluto, Hecate, Proserpine), Tib. 1, 2, 62; Luc. 6, 577: “linguae,” i. e. hieroglyphics, id. 3, 222; “but lingua,” skilled in incantations, Ov. M. 7, 330; Luc. 3, 224: “cantus,” Juv. 6, 610: “magicae resonant ubi Memnone chordae,” mysterious, id. 15, 5.

Cantus , ūs, m. id., I. the production of melodious sound, a musical utterance or expression, either with voice or instrument; hence, song, singing, playing, music
2. With instruments, a playing, music: “in nervorum vocumque cantibus,” Cic. Tusc. 1, 2, 4; id. Rosc. Am. 46, 134: “citharae,” Hor. C. 3, 1, 20: “horribili stridebat tibia cantu,” Cat. 64, 264: “querulae tibiae,” Hor. C. 3, 7, 30: “dulcis tibia cantu,” Tib. 1, 7, 47: “bucinarum,” Cic. Mur. 9, 22: “simul ac tubarum est auditus cantus,” Liv. 25, 24, 5: “lyrae,” Plin. 34, 8, 19, § 72: “tibicines, qui fidibus utuntur, suo arbitrio cantus numerosque moderantur,” Cic. Tusc. 5, 36, 104:
“Of an actor: tardiores tibicinis modos et cantus remissiores facere,” Cic. de Or. 1, 60, 254
A. Prophetic or oracular song: “veridicos Parcae coeperunt edere cantus,” Cat. 64, 306; cf. Tib. 1, 8, 4
B. An incantation, charm, magic song, etc.: cantusque artesque magorum. Ov. M. 7, 195; 7, 201: “at cantu commotae Erebi de sedibus imis Umbrae ibant,” Verg. G. 4, 471: “magici,
Mălĕfĭcus (in MSS. also mălĭfĭ-cus ), a, um, adj. malefacio,
B. In partic., magical: “artes,” Vulg. 2 Par. 33, 6.—As substt.
1. mălĕfĭcus , i, m., a magician, enchanter
2. mălĕfĭcum , i, n., a charm, means of enchantment: “semusti cineres aliaque malefica, quis creditur anima numinibus inferis sacrari,” Tac. A. 2, 69 fin.—

2 Chronicles 33[6] He also made his children to pass through the fire in the valley of the son of Hinnom; and he practiced sorcery, and used enchantments, and practiced sorcery, and dealt with those who had familiar spirits, and with wizards: he worked much evil in the sight of Yahweh, to provoke him to anger.

2 Chronicles 33.6
transireque fecit filios suos per ignem in valle Benennon observabat somnia sectabatur auguria maleficis artibus inserviebat habebat secum magos et incantatores multaque mala operatus est coram Domino ut inritaret eum
Ars , artis, f. v. arma,
(a). Rhetorical : “quam multa non solum praecepta in artibus, sed etiam exempla in orationibus bene dicendi reliquerunt!” Cic. Fin. 4, 3, 5: “ipsae rhetorum artes, quae sunt totae forenses atque populares,” id. ib. 3, 1, 4: neque eo dico, quod ejus (Hermagorae) ars mihi mendosissime scripta videatur; nam satis in eā videtur ex antiquis artibus (from the ancient works on rhetoric) ingeniose et diligenter electas res collocāsse, id. Inv. 1, 6 fin.: “illi verbis et artibus aluerunt naturae principia, hi autem institutis et legibus,” id. Rep. 3, 4, 7: “artem scindens Theodori,” Juv. 7, 177

Tŭmultus ,  “canunt ignes subitosque tumultus,” Manil. 1, 894: “novos moveat F ortuna tumultus,” Hor. S. 2, 2, 126
2. Of thunder, storm, etc.: “tremendo Juppiter ipse ruens tumultu,” i. e. the roar of thunder, magis, Extreme Anxiety
A. Disturbance, disquietude, agitation, tumult of the mind or feelings: “tumultus Mentis,” Hor. C. 2, 16, 10; Luc. 7, 183: “pulsata tumultu pectora, Petr. poλt. 123: sceleris tumultus,” Hor. S. 2, 3, 208
“Acheron rapitur tumultu ingenti,” Sen. Herc. Fur. 714: “ “tumultus magis quam proelium fuit,”
B. Of speech, confusion, disorder: “sermonis,” Plin. 7, 12, 10, § 55: “criminum,” Quint. Decl. 1, 4.
“canunt ignes subitosque tumultus,”

A. Cano canta pro cantata ponebant; “once canituri,” Vulg. Apoc. 8, 13), 3, v. n. and a. [cf. kanassō, kanakhē, konabos; Germ. Hahn; Engl. chanticleer; kuknos, ciconice; Sanscr. kōkas = duck; Engl. cock], orig. v. n., to produce melodious sounds, whether of men or animals;

B. Ignis: Light the fire, Incentor song starter.

C.  Sŭb-ĕo , Subdue, go under 2. In partic., to come on secretly, to advance or approach stealthily, to steal upon, steal into (poet.), Prop. 1, 9, 26; Ov. Am. 1, 2, 6; id. A. A. 1, 742
“subit ipse meumque Explet opus,” succeeds me, takes my place, id. ib. 3, 648
1. In gen., to come in, succeed, take place; to enter stealthily, come secretly or by degrees: in quarum locum subierunt inquilinae impietas, perfidia, impudentia

This is the meaning of a HERETIC who uses the performing arts.

D.  Tumultus
Malachi 3:13 “Your words have been stout against me,” says Yahweh. “
        Yet you say, ‘What have we spoken against you?’
Malachi 3:14 You have said, ‘It is vain to serve God;’
        and ‘What profit is it that we have kept his charge,
        and that we have walked mournfully before Yahweh of Hosts?

Corrupting the Word is "selling learning at wholesale" or "adultery." Honest preachers will never be rich and famous and never treacherous enough to deliberately to come on secretly, to advance or approach stealthily, to steal upon, steal into
THE FULFILLMENT OF THE GOSPEL
Matthew 11:28 Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.
Jesus called the Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites. In the Ezekiel 33 example Christ named speakers, singers and instrument players.  Almost always they performed for the burden or "a tax not in time of war."  Christ in Isaiah 55 says that we should not be burdened by using our food money for the free water of the Word. Now, all theatrical and musical performers feel a bit inspired and they think that we should put the same value on them. However, religious performers especially sacrificial musicians were called parasites.

We are all tired from making a living and need a day of REST.  There is no role for an institution to consume all of your rest time and all of your "spare" money for which there is "no law of tithing or giving."

kop-iaō

Everyone is Tired from Sunday Worship as the hardest day of the week.

Orkheomai , dōsō toi Tegeēn possikroton orkhēsasthai to dance in or on, Orac. ap. Hdt. 1.66, cf. Lakōnika skhēmatia orkheisthai dance Laconian steps, Id.6.129 ; “o. pros ton aulon [flute] skhēmata” Id.Smp.7.5
“tōn humnōn hoi men ōrkhounto hoi de ouk ōrkhounto” Ath.14.631d.

III. Act. orkheō , make to dance (v. Pl.Cra.407a), is used by Ion Trag.50, ek tōn aelptōn mallon ōrkhēsen phrenas made my heart leap (so codd. Ath., ōrkhēsai Nauck); but orkēsi in Ar.Th.1179 is a barbarism for orkhētai.
Everyone is Tired of:
phi^losophos , ho, A. lover of wisdom; Pythagoras called himself philosophos, not sophos, Cic Tusc.5.3.9, D.L.Prooem.12; “ton ph. sophias phēsomen epithumētēn einai pasēs” Pl.R.475b,2. philosopher, i. e. one who speculates on truth and reality, hoi alēthinoi ph., defined as hoi tēs alētheias philotheamones, Pl.R.475e;
Everyone is Tired of:
Sophis-tēs , ou, ho, A. master of one's craft, adept, expert, of diviners, Hdt.2.49; of poets, “meletan sophistais prosbalon” Pi.I.5(4).28, cf. Cratin.2; of musicians, “sophistēs . . parapaiōn khelun” [turtle harp] A.Fr.314, cf. Eup.447, Pl.Com. 140; sophistē Thrēki (sc. Thamyris) E.Rh.924, cf. Ath.14.632c: with modal words added, “hoi s. tōn hierōn melōn” (religious melody) “Apollōnidē sophistē”
Magga^n-eia , , A. trickery, esp. of magical arts, Pl.Lg.908d; magganeiai kai epōdai ib.933a; “periapta kai m.” Ph.2.267, Gal.11.792; “tēs Kirkēs [CHUIRCH] m.”
Everyone sick of people BURDENING when Jesus died to give them REST?
phort-izō , phortia ph. tinas load them with burdens, Ev.Luc.11.46; perissē dapanē ph. ta koina
“hudatis -izousa ton ophthalmon” encumbering, Hes.Op.690; phortioumenos meli to carry away a load of honey,
Aenigma Sphingis (ap.Sch.E.Ph.50):
Now when the Sphinx was oppressing and ravaging our city, after my husband's death, my brother Creon proclaimed my marriage: that he would marry me to anyone who should guess the riddle of the crafty maiden. It happened somehow [50] that my son, Oedipus, guessed the Sphinx's song; [and so he became king of this land] and received the scepter of this land as his prize. He married his mother in ignorance, luckless wretch! nor did his mother know that she was sleeping with her son.
Phortikos hapanta mimoumenē tekhnē phortikē art that imitates with a view to any and every man is vulgar, of an inflated rhetorical style, to discourse more like a clown than one of liberal education 2. philosopher, i. e. one who speculates on truth and reality,  -ōtatē leitourgia” most onerous, ; Epainos praise singing  mim-eomai

Phort-i^kos , ē, on: (phortos)
II. of the nature of a burden: metaph. (cf. “phortos” 11), tiresome, wearisome, “to legein . . ph. kai epakhthes” D.5.4; “tois sunousi ph.” Plu.2.456e, cf. 44a, etc.; ph. akolouthōn okhlō because of the crowd . . , Luc.Nigr.13; “-ōtatē leitourgia” most onerous, POxy.904.9 (v A. D.).
2. coarse, vulgar, common, “andres” Ar.Nu.524; opp. pepaideumenos, Arist.Pol. 1342a20; hoi polloi kai -ōtatoi, opp. hoi kharientes, Id.EN1095b16; bōmolokhoi kai ph. ib.1128a5; “ph. kai neoploutos” Plu.2.708c.
b. of things, ph. kōmōdia a vulgar, low comedy, Ar.V.66, cf. Pl.Phdr.236c; “ph. to khōrion” Ar.Lys.1218; “ph. gelōs” Com.Adesp.644; “diaita -ōtera kai aphilosophos” Pl.Phdr.256b; “hēdonē ph.” Id.R.581d; ph. kai dēmēgorika base, low arguments, ad captandum vulgus,
Everyone digusted with?
Mim-eomai II. of the arts, represent, express by means of imitation, of an actor, Id.R.605c, cf.Ar.Pl.291 (lyr.); of painting and music, Pl.Plt.306d; “tēn tōn melōn mimēsin tēn eu kai tēn kakōs memimēmenēn” Id.Lg.812c; of poetry, Arist.Po.1447a17, al.; of mimoi, represent, act,

Plat. Laws 812c  regarding rhythms and harmonic compositions, in order that when dealing with musical representations of a good kind or a bad, by which the soul is emotionally affected, they may be able to pick out the reproductions of the good kind and of the bad, and having rejected the latter, may produce the other in public, and charm the souls of the children by singing them,

Aristot. Poet. 1447a Let us here deal with Poetry, its essence and its several species, with the characteristic function of each species and the way in which plots must be constructed if the poem is to be a success; and also with the number and character of the constituent parts of a poem, and similarly with all other matters proper to this same inquiry; and let us, as nature directs, begin first with first principles.

JESUS DIED TO GIVE US REST FROM ALL RELIGIOUS MERCHANDISERS

Rest From;

ana-pauō , poet. and Ion. amp- , fut. Med. anapausomai: aor. anepausamēn
make to cease, stop or hinder from a thing, “kheimōnos . . hos rha te ergōn anthrōpous anepausen” Il.17.550; a. tina tou planou give him rest from wandering, S.OC1113; tous leitourgountas a. (sc. tōn analōmatōn) to relieve them from . . , D.42.25, cf. 42.

Rest From;
leitourg-eō , 2. perform religious service, minister, “epi tōn hierōn” D.H.2.22; “t. (Written lit- in Rev.Et.Anc.32.5 (Athens, i B.C.), etc., cf. leitourgion, leitourgos.
IV. Astrol., leitourgoi, hoi, astral gods subordinate to the dekanoi, Iamb.Myst.9.2
D.H. 2.22
ei de kai dia gunaikōn edei tina hiera sunteleisthai kai dia paidōn amphithalōn hetera, hina kai tauta genētai kata to kratiston, tas te gunaikas etaxe tōn hiereōn tois heautōn andrasi sunierasthai, kai ei ti themis ēn hup' andrōn orgiazesthai kata nomon ton epikhōrion, tautas epitelein kai paidas autōn ta kathēkonta leitourgein:
If you want to perform liturgy for GOD then Jesus gives you a GO button. Jesus said that the Kingdom of god (within you) does NOT come with observation: that mean liturgy or so-called Worship Services when Jesus commanded A School (only) of His Words (only)

Observātiō ōnis, observo, a watching, observance, investigation: observationes animadvertebant, your searches for evidence: siderumCircumspection, care, exactness: summa in bello movendo.

Religious observations are carefully crafted to take control of all of one's attention. That is the worship concept with is to be directed only to God.

Tendo: In the pagan religions they gave lots of attention to tuning or playing their musical  instruments: cornu,” “barbiton,” to tune, “tympana tenta tonant palmis, stretching out their bow strings. To shoot, to hurl.

(b). To exert one's self, to strive, endeavor (mostly poet.
b.
n partic., to exert one's self in opposition, to strive, try, endeavor, contend   “adversus, etc.,” id. 34, 34, 1: “contra,

Service under the cursed Civil-Military-Clergy complex was HARD BONDAGE.
THE ONLY LITURGY OPEN FOR ANY BIBLE TRAINED PERSON IS:

Acts 13:2 As they ministered to the Lord, and fasted, the Holy Ghost said,
        Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them.
Acts 13:3 And when they had fasted and prayed, and laid their hands on them, they sent them away.
leitourg-os , III. in religioussense, minister, [theou] ib.Ps.102(103).21, Ep.Rom.13.6, al.; “tōn theōn” D.H.2.22, cf. 73; “tōn hagiōn l.” Ep.Hebr.8.2; theois litourgoi  
THE GREEK WORD PSALLO IS ALSO USED TO JUSTIFY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN WORSHIP
Psallo is never and can never mean both PLUCK and A STRING which at the  ROOT is used to shoot a literal arrow or a Love Arrow.  The Psao words were used when the Septuagint or LXX was translated because they understood that the praises or "halals" were WARRIOR'S chants and intended to THREATEN the enemy if that did not turn coward and run they would be SODOMIZED and then killed to prove SUPERIORITY.
THE LATIN WORD -Psalmus , i, m., = psalmos, i. q. psalma,
I. a psalm (eccl. Lat.; cf.: carmen, hymnus), Vulg. Isa. 38, 20.--Esp., the Psalms of David

Other than SPEAKING that which is written for our LEARNING (not pagan worship) these PSAO (root of SOP) words point directly to the Apollo (Abaddon, Apollyon) from Egypt, Mount Sinai and in a church near you. His Musical Worship Girls (Muses Rev 18) were the LOCUSTS, sorcerers and dirty adulteresses.

The burdens or carmen: 

Carmen   declaim, praise; cf.: camilla, censeo], a tune, song; poem, verse; an oracular response, a prophecy; a form of incantation
1. In gen., a tune, song, air, lay, strain, note, sound, both vocal and instrumental (mostly poet.; in prose, instead of it, cantus; Also the sound of waves,

4. A response of an oracle, a prophecy, prediction
5. A magic formula, an incantation used by Circe (church) 

CHURCH: Circus , i, m., = kirkos [kindr. with krikos; Dor. kirkos, and korτnκ; cf.: kulindeτ, kullos, cirrus, curvus]. In or around the Circus many jugglers and soothsayers, etc., stationed themselves;

6. On account of the very ancient practice of composing forms of religion and law in Saturnian verse, also a formula in religion or law, a form:

ALL recorded history would use Pluck + a NAMED instrument which would not include a melody or rhythm.
OF: you MUST use compound words each instrument having a DEDICATED word. FOR INSTANCE:

-Psalmos , ho, twitching or twanging with the fingers, psalmoi toxτn E.Ion173 (lyr.); toxκrei psalmτi [toxeusas] Id.HF1064 (lyr.).
2. the sound of the cithara or harp, Pi.Fr.125, cf. Phryn.Trag.11; “psalmos d' alalazei” A.Fr.57.7 (anap.); there were contests in to psallein,

Eur. Ion 144 [170] Ah, ah! what is this new bird that approaches; you will not place under the cornice a straw-built nest for your children, will you? My singing bow will keep you off. Will you not obey? [175] Go away and bring up your offspring by the eddies of Alpheus, or go to the Isthmian grove, so that the offerings, and the temple of Phoebus, are not harmed. . . . and yet I am ashamed to kill you, [180] for to mortals you bear the messages of the gods; but I will be subject to Phoebus in my appointed tasks, and I will never cease my service to those who nourish me.

Psalmos also appears in the LXX as equivalent to the Hebrew word neginah [5058]. This Hebrew term is used to describe a wide variety of songs. Neginah is translated by psalmos in Lam 3:14 (song), in Lam 5:14 (music) and in Ps 69:12 (song). It is striking to observe that in the LXX translation of Lam 3:14 and Ps 69:12, psalmos, or its verbal form, is used for songs that are not only uninspired but are in fact the product of the wicked, even drunkards, who mocked God and His word. The Hebrew term neginah is used elsewhere in the Hebrew Scriptures of: the songs of the wicked, Job 30:9 (song); the inspired praise of God, Psalm 61 title (Neginah-a song performed on a stringed instrument); and the uninspired praisd of the Lord composed by King Hezekiah, Is 38:20 (my songs).

DO YOU WANT TO SAY THAT THE SPIRIT OF CHRIST, JESUS AND ALL RECORDED HISTORIANS WERE JUST FLAT OUT LIARS?  Why do you think people are DESTINED to TWIST the psallo words intending to SOW DISCORD and offend everyone (Jeff walling) when in Tom Burgess' list of PLUCKING words it always applies to older males plucking the harp trying to seduce the youth minsisters of the Mother Goddess?

Not included by Paul: PsalmOidia singing TO a harp.

Not included by Paul: PsaltOideo sing to the harp 2 Chron 5:[13]  it happened, when the trumpeters and singers were as one, to make one sound to be heard [one tuned note all in unison]

Not included by Paul:  Psaltos sung to the harp, sung OF Translated sing in Psalm 119:54

Psalm 119WEB.[52]  I remember your ordinances of old, Yahweh, And have comforted myself. [53]  Indignation has taken hold
Not included by Paul:  BarbitOidos singing to the barbiton Barbitos , v. H. 15, 8;  barbiton -os), a lyre, a lute  Latinum, Barbite, carmen

Of the Performers: See Paul wishing they would LET THE KNIFE SLIP in Galatians 5 and witchcraft.

OFTEN included by Paul: Phallikos,, of or for the phallos: to ph. (sc. MELOS) the phallic song, Ar.Ach.261, Arist.Po.1449a11; restd. in IG12.187.33; also a dance, Poll.4.100.
Galliambus, i, m. [3. Gallus, II. A.] , a song of the priests [a castratos] of Cybele


Rhea is EVE and Paul outlaws women PERFORMERS based on the widespread use of EVE (Zoe) as the only mediatrixEvah is defined as the abomination when women perform in the holy places which Christ restricted to being A School of the Word to be PREACHED by being READ.  Any kind of exciting presentation is in history the MARK of the Sophia-Zoe (Eve) effeminate breakout which Paul called WRATH or ORGY.

Commentary on Catullius, Poem 63   The self-mutilation and subsequent lament of Attis, a priest of Cybele. The centre of the worship of the Phrygian Kubelē or Kubēbē, was in very ancient times the town of Pessinus in Galatian Phrygia, at the foot of Mt. Dindymus, from which the goddess received the name Dindymene. Cybele had early become identified with the Cretan divinity Rhea, the Mother of the Gods, and to some extent with Demeter, the search of Cyhele for Attis being compared with that of Demeter for Persephone. The especial worship of Cybele was conducted by emasculated priests called Galli (or, as in vv. 12 and 34, with reference to their physical condition, Gallae). Their name was derived by the ancients from that of the river Gallus, a tributary of the Sangarius, by drinking from which men became inspired with frenzy (cf. Ov. Fast. 4.361ff.

The worship was orgiastic in the extreme, and was accompanied by the sound of such frenzy-producing instruments as the tympana, cymbala, tibiae, and cornu, and culminated in scourging, self-mutilation, syncope from excitement (fainting from losss of blood to the head). and even death from hemorrhage or heart-failure. The worship of the Magna Mater, or Mater Idaea, as she was often called (perhaps from identification with Rhea of the Cretan Mt. Ida rather than from the Trojan Mt. Ida), was introduced into Rome in 205 B.C. in accordance with a Sibylline oracle which foretold that only so couldβ foreign enemy (i.e. Hannibal) be driven from Italy. Livy 29.10, Livy 29.14)

Not included by Paul:HupAuleo to play on the flute in accompaniment, melody (melos never psallo)
Not included by Paul: HupoKitharizo play an accompaniment on the harp
Not commanded by Paul:
 KitharOidesis singing to the cithra

Often INCLUDED including David: Lusioidos one who played women's characters in male attire, Auloi flutes that accompany such songs.
Not included by Paul: Kat-auleō , A. charm by flute-playing, tinos Pl.Lg.790e, cf. R.411a; tinaAlciphr.2.1: metaph., se . . -ēsō phobō I will flute to you on a ghastly flute,E.HF871 (troch.):—Pass., of persons, methuōn kai katauloumenos drinking wine to the strains of the flute, Pl.R.561c; k. pros khelōnidos psophon to be played to on the flute with lyre accompaniment,   “ta mētrōa”  , to have played to one as an accompaniment on the flute, -“oumenoi pros tōn hepomenōn ta mētrōa melē”
Eph. 5:18 And be not drunk  [methuōn] with wine, wherein is excess;
        but be filled with the Spirit; (The Word of Christ Col 3:16; John 6:63)
Eph. 5:19 Speaking to yourselves
                    \ in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs,
                             \ singing and making melody [Grace and its effects Col 3:16] IN your heart
                                to the Lord; (Excludes performance FOR the audience]
2. make a place sound with flute-playing, Thphr.Fr.87:— Pass., resound with flute-playing, “nēsos katēuleito” Plu.Ant.56.
II. in Pass., [ton monokhordon kanona parekhein tais aisthēsesi . . katauloumenon subdued by a flute accompaniment,  to be piped down, ridiculed, “gelōmenoi kai -oumenoi”  
III. c. acc. rei, play on the flute

Biblical Hymns are prayers: you cannot be worshiping God if you are getting eraptured over the boy and girl singers always a mark of gender confusion by the leaders
Not included by Paul: Epi-psallō , A. play the lyre, S.Fr.60, Poll.4.58(Pass.); “melesi kai rhuthmois” Plu.2.713b ; sing, “tous humnous” LXX 2 Ma.1.30:—Pass., Ph.1.626.
Not included by Paul: Anti-psallτ , A.play a stringed instrument in accompaniment of song, a. elegois phorminga Ar.Av.218 .
Not included by Paul:
-psal-ma
, atos, to, A. tune played on a stringed instrument

Psalmus  i, m., = psalmos, i. q. psalma, I. a psalm (eccl. Lat.; cf.: “carmen, hymnus),” Tert. adv. Prax. 11; Lact. 4, 8, 14; 4, 12, 7; Vulg. Isa. 38, 20.—Esp., the Psalms of David, Vulg. Luc. 20, 42; id. Act. 13, 33 et saep.

carmen
I. a tune, song; poem, verse; an oracular response, a prophecy; a form of incantation
Carmen ALWAYS INCLUDES an instrument when one INTENDS to list one.
A Tuba:  carmen tuba ista peregit ( = sonus),
A Guitar: “carmine vocali clarus citharāque USED OF APOLLO, ABADDON, APOLLYON  “per me (sc. Apollinem) concordant carmina nervis,
A Lyre : “lyrae carmen,”
A Flute:“harundineum

The Levites prophesied or were SOOTHSAYERS with musical instruments:

Not included by Paul:  Psal-tikos A. of or for harp playing, ps. organon a stringed instrument, (of the magadis); andra psaltikκn agathon a good harpist, Ael. ap. Ar.Byz.Epit.84.8.

  1. If you say that when God turned the Levites over to worship the starry host and sentenced them to beyond Babylon.
  2. He commanded the preacher that this is God's command for Instrumental Praise in the church
  3. Then, you are one of the MANY corrupting the word or selling learning at wholesale and are TASKED to lead as many as possible into the Lake of Fire where rhetoricians, singers and instrument players are consigned for being God's enemy.
  1. If you say that the word PSALLO commands instruments.
  2. When the Spirit and Paul and Silly Sally knew that you need a COMPOUND word to define both PLAY and a named INSTRUMENT.
  3. Then you may be guilty of saying that the Holy Spirit of Christ and Paul were just too illiterate.
  4. That is defined as BLASPHEMING the Holy Spirit OF Christ in Jeremiah 23

 
Jer 15:16 Thy words were found,
        and I did eat them; and

        thy word was unto me the joy

        and rejoicing of mine heart

              for (because) I am called by thy name, O Lord God of hosts.

The Word was Christ's joy or gaudĭum  was inward joy, joy, gladness, delight ratione (rational Logos) and  dicitur (spoken)

This was OPPOSITE of laetĭtĭa , I. joy, esp. unrestrained joyfulness, gladness, pleasure, delight (cf.: gaudium, hilaritas), another outbreak of joy. Of speech, sweetness, grace: “laetitia et pulcritudo orationis, Bacchus,,” to be transported with joy,

IN the -membrum , Not in the members of the human body:

Jeremiah 4.4[4]  Circumcise yourselves to Yahweh, and take away the foreskins of your heart, you men of Judah and inhabitants of Jerusalem; lest my wrath go forth like fire, and burn so that none can quench it, because of the evil of your doings.
1Cor. 4:5 Therefore judge nothing before the time, until the Lord come, who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels of the hearts: and then shall every man have praise of God.

But 4. Of the Church of Christ: “singuli autem alter alterius membra,” Vulg. Rom. 12, 5; cf. “the context: membra sumus corporis ejus,” i. e. Christ's, id. Eph. 5, 30.

Romans 12:1 I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that YE present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God,  which is your reasonable service.  
         tēn logikēn latreian humōn:
        
Rătĭōnābĭlis , e, adj. ratio (post-Aug.; = rationalis, which is in better use),
          I. reasonable, rational: he pure milk of reason, id.
       1
Pet. 2, 2: “sententia vera et rationabilis,”
Romans 12:2 And be not conformed to this world:  but be ye transformed
(metamorph-oō ) by the renewing of your mind,
        that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable,
        and perfect, will of God.
Romans 12.[5] so we, who are many, are one body in Christ, and individually members one of another.
IN THE HEART  Cor feeling (poet.): “videas corde amare inter se,” from the heart, cordially,
b.  Cordi est alicui, it lies at one's heart, it pleases, is pleasing, agreeable, or dear:
B. (cf. Cic. Tusc. 1, 9, 18) as the seat of wisdom, understanding, heart, mind, judgment,
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Kenneth Sublett

2.08.13
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