The.Beast.Serpent.Serpo.Herpo.Genesis.3

Lipscomb University Summer Celebration 2019.  The beast in Revelation is "A New style of music or Satyric (Pan, Cappella) Drama

The.Beast.Serpent.Serpo.Herpo.Genesis.3
The.Beast.Serpent.Serpo.Herpo.Genesis.3
Leonard Allen The Spirit Poured out.  God's Spirit is His BREATH it produces WORDS but not after the time of Jesus
Leonard Allen Poured out NECESSARY to enable the Mission of Jesus Christ. 

Genesis.3.Serpo.gif

DIONYSIACA BOOK 1, TRANSLATED BY W. H. D. ROUSE

The first contains Cronion, light-bearing ravisher of the nymph, and the starry heaven battered by Typhon’s hands.

[1] Tell the tale, Goddess, of Cronides’ courier with fiery flame, the gasping travail which the thunderbolt brought with sparks for wedding-torches, the lightning in waiting upon Semele’s nuptials; tell the naissance of Bacchos twice-born, whom Zeus lifted still moist from the fire, a baby half-complete born without midwife; how with shrinking hands he cut the incision in his thigh and carried him in his man’s womb, father and gracious mother at once – and well he remembered another birth, when his own head conceived, when his temple was big with child, and he carried that incredible unbegotten lump, until he shot out Athena scintillating in her armour.

[11] Bring me the fennel, rattle the cymbals, ye Muses!
        put in my hand the wand of Dionysos whom I sing:
        but bring me a partner for your dance in the neighbouring island of Paros,1
        Proteus of many turns, that he may appear in all his diversity of shapes,
        since I twang my harp to a diversity of songs.
        For if, as a serpent, he should glide along his winding trail,
        I will sing my god’s achievement, how with ivy-wreathed wand
        he destroyed the horrid hosts of Giants serpent-haired.
If as a lion he shake his bristling mane, I will cry “Euoi!” to Bacchos on the arm of buxom kij, stealthily draining the breast of the lionbreeding goddess. If as a leopard he shoot up into the air with a stormy leap from his pads, changing shape like a master-craftsman,
        I will hymn the son of Zeus, how he slew the Indian nation,
        with his team of pards riding down the elephants.
If he make his figure like the shape of a boar,
        I will sing Thyone’s son, love-sick for Aura the desirable,
        boarslayer, daughter of Cybele, mother of the third Bacchos late-born.2
If he be mimic water, I will sing Dionysos diving into the bosom of the brine, when Lycurgos3 armed himself.
If he become a quivering tree and tune a counterfeit whispering,
        I will tell of Icarios,4 how in the jubilant winepress his feet crushed the grape in rivalry.

[34] Bring me the fennel, Mimallons!5 On my shoulders in place of the wonted kirtle, bind, I pray, tight over my breast a dapple-back fawnskin, full of the perfume of Maronian nectar6; and let Homer and deep-sea Eidothea keep the rank skin of the seals for Menelaos.
        Give me the jocund tambours and the goatskins!
        but leave for another the double-sounding pipe with its melodious sweetness,
        or I may offend my own Apollo;
        for he rejects the sound of breathing reeds,
        ever since he put to shame Marsyas7 and his god-defiant pipes,
        and bared every limb of the skin-stript shepherd,
        and hung his skin on a tree to belly in the breezes.

SERPO in Genesis in the Latin and Classics identify a sly, cunning person who uses winding, complex music like a slowly-spreading fire.

drak-izō ,  A.play the buffoon, Gloss.
dra^keis , drakēnai , drakon , A.v. derkomai:—but draken: energei, prassei, is prob. f. l. for dedraken, Hsch.
geloi-astēs , ou, ho, A. jester, buffoon, Ptol. Megalop.2, LXX Jb.31.5, Poll.5.128, prob. in Luc.Merc.Cond. 4.
Job 31.5 "If I have walked with falsehood, And my foot has hurried to deceit
kopr-ias , ou, ho, (kopros) in pl., A.buffoons, a word first used under the Roman emperors, D.C.50.28, 73.6: Lat. copreae, Suet. Tib.61. (Perh. so called because ek koprias anairethentes, or because of their obscenity.)

Rev. 12:12 ¶ Therefore rejoice, ye heavens, and ye that dwell in them. Woe to the inhabiters of the earth and of the sea! for the devil is come down unto you, having great wrath, because he knoweth that he hath but a short time.
Rev. 12:13 And when the dragon saw that he was cast unto the earth, he persecuted the woman which brought forth the man child.


dra^kōn
, dra^komenos ,
A.v. derkomai.

derkomai (Act. only in Hsch.) flashing fire from his eyes
phonia d.Ar.Ra.1337
  

II. of light, flash, gleam, like the eye, dedorken phaos, pheggos, Id.N.3.84, 9.41; dedorkos blepein to be keen-eyed
Pind. N.3-[75] And mortal life sets in motion four excellences, and bids us to think of what is at hand. You are2 not without these excellences. Farewell, my friend! I am sending this to you, honey mixed with white milk, crested with foam from mixing, a draught of song accompanied by the Aeolian breathings of flutes, [80] although it is late. The eagle is swift among birds: he swoops down from afar, and suddenly seizes with his talons his blood-stained quarry; but chattering daws stay closer to the ground. By the grace of Clio on her lovely throne and because of your victorious spirit, the light has shone on you from Nemea and Epidaurus and

Pind. N. 9 [40]
Muses, we will go in victory procession from Apollo's shrine in Sicyon to newly-founded Aetna, where the doors flung open wide are overwhelmed by guests, at the prosperous home of Chromius. Make a sweet song of verses! For, mounting his chariot of victorious horses, he gives the word to sing for the mother and her twin children [5] who jointly watch over steep Pytho. There is a saying among men: a noble deed when it is accomplished should not be buried silently in the ground; and divine song is suited to boasting. But we will wake the shouting lyre and the flute in honor of the very pinnacle of horse-contests, which Adrastus established for Phoebus by the streams of the Asopus.

and around the steep cliffs of the Helorus' banks at the place which men call “the passage of Rhea,” this light has shone on the son of Hagesidamus, in his earliest manhood. I will tell of the honors he won at other times, many on the dust of dry land and on the neighboring sea. And out of toils, which are undertaken with the aid of youth and justice, there comes a gentle life at the approach of old age. [45] Let him know that he has received marvellous prosperity from the gods. For if, together with many possessions, a man wins renown and glory, there is no higher peak on which a mortal can set his feet. Peace loves the symposium, and new-flourishing victory is fostered by soft song, and the voice becomes bold beside the mixing-bowl. [50] Let someone mix the wine now, the sweet forerunner of victory-song, and dispense the powerful son of the vine in those silver goblets which once Chromius' horses won for him and sent from holy Sicyon together with the duly twined garlands of Leto's son. Father Zeus, I pray that I may celebrate this excellence by the favor of the Graces, and excel many poets in honoring victory with my verses, [55] throwing my shaft nearest of all to the mark of the Muses.

monōdeō
,
A. sing a monody or solo, Ar.Pax1012, Th.1077 (both anap.): c. acc., boulei monōdēsōmen autois hen ge ti; Cratin.10 D., cf. Luc.Hist.Conscr.1.

Aiskhulos

1325toiauti mentoi su poiōn
tolmas tama melē psegein,
ana to dōdekamēkhanon
Kurēnēs melopoiōn;
ta men melē sou tauta: boulomai d' eti
1330ton tōn monōdiōn diexelthein tropon.
ō nuktos kelainophaēs
orphna, tina moi
dustanon oneiron
pempeis ex aphanous,
Aida promolon,
psukhan apsukhon ekhonta,
1335melainas Nuktos paida,
phrikōdē deinan opsin,
melanonekueimona,
phonia phonia derkomenon,

Aristoph. Frogs 1337
Aeschylus

Well, you write this sort of thing
and dare to criticize my lyrics,
you composer in the twelve tone style of Cyrene?
So much for his songs. I still want
to scrutinize the manner of his melodies.
Oh dark-shining night's
gloom, what woeful dream
do you send to me, from unseen Hades'
vestibules, possessing a soulless
soul, child
of black night, hair-raising horrible
sight, black-corpse-shrouded, murder, murder
envisioning, with long fingernails?

Dionysus
Stop with the songs already.

Aeschylus
I've had enough, too.
For now I want to bring him to the scale
which alone will put our poetry to the test.
For it will prove the weight of our phrases.

Dionysus
Then come here, if I really have to do this,
  1. to deal with poets just like selling cheese.




This is CENI: the purpose of the Church.

2Timothy 2:1 Thou therefore, my son, be strong in the grace that is in Christ Jesus.
2Timothy 2:2 And the things that thou hast heard of me among many witnesses,
        the same commit thou to faithful men,
        who shall be able to teach others also.
2Timothy 2:3 Thou therefore endure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus Christ.

2Timothy 2:4 No man that warreth ENTANGLETH himself with the affairs of this life;
         that he may please him who hath chosen him to be a soldier. 

Emplek-ō , Ep. eniplekō , pf.
e. tēn hēdonēn eis tēn eudaimonianArist.EN1153b15; poiē eniplexō se (sc. aoidē); Call.Del.29
Aoid-ē a^] 1. art of song,autar aoidēn thespesiēn aphelontoIl.2.599; “hōs ara toi . . theos ōpase thespin a.Od.8.498.
Id.Lg.669d; “e. tēn hēdonēn eis tēn eudaimonianA

poieō     “waon apo tou hierou arguriouX.An. 5.3.9
also tōn ta kerea . . hoi pēkhees poieuntai the horns of which are made into the sides of the lyre
4. after Hom., of Poets, compose, write, p. dithurambon, epea, Hdt.1.23, 4.14; “p. theogoniēn HellēsiId.2.53; p. Phaidran, Saturous, Ar.Th.153, 157; p. kōmōdian, tragōdian, etc., Pl.Smp.223d; “palinōdianIsoc.10.64, Pl.Phdr.243b, etc.; “poiēmataId.Phd.60d: abs., write poetry, write as a poet,orthōs p.Hdt.3.38; “en toisi epesi p.Id.4.16, cf. Pl.Ion534b: folld. by a quotation, “epoēsas pote . .Ar.Th.193; “eis tinaPl.Phd.61b; “peri theōnId.R.383a, etc.

c. describe in verse,theon en epesinPl.R.379a; epoiēsa muthous tous Aisōpou put them into verse, Id.Phd. 61b; “

Xen. Anab. 5.3.9  Here Xenophon built an altar and a temple with the sacred money, and from that time forth he would every year take the tithe of the products of the land in their season and offer sacrifice to the goddess, all the citizens and the men and women of the neighbourhood taking part in the festival. And the goddess would provide for the banqueters barley meal and loaves of bread, wine and sweetmeats, and a portion of the sacrificial victims from the sacred herd as well as of the victims taken in the chase. 

Id.Lg.669d;   a tune or verses of an opposite style. Nor would the Muses ever combine in a single piece the cries of beasts and men, the clash of instruments, and noises of all kinds, by way of representing a single object; whereas human poets, by their senselessness in mixing such things and jumbling them up together, would furnish a theme for laughter to all the men who, in OrpheusÕ phrase, “have attained the full flower of joyousness.” For they behold all these things jumbled together, and how, also, the poets rudely sunder rhythm and gesture from tune, putting tuneless words into meter, or leaving time and rhythm

eis askholias bathuteras tōn egkukliōn

askhol-ia , , A.occupation, business, engagement,
opp. hēsukhia, Th.1.70; emoi
II. want of time or leisure, a. agein philosophias peri to have no leisure, for pursuing it, Pl.Phd.66d; a. agein to be engaged or occupied, Id.Ap.39e; “a. ekhein pros tiPlu.Comp. Sol.Publ.2; opp. skholē,

Plat. Phaedo 66d  for the sake of the body. We are slaves to its service. And so, because of all these things, we have no leisure for philosophy. But the worst of all is that if we do get a bit of leisure and turn to philosophy, the body is constantly breaking in upon our studies and disturbing us with noise and confusion, so that it prevents our beholding the truth, and in fact we perceive that, if we are ever to know anything absolutely, we must be free from the body and must behold

thoru^b-os , ho,
A.  noise, esp. the confused noise of a crowded assembly, uproar, clamour

poieō

  also tōn ta kerea . . hoi pēkhees poieuntai the horns of which are made into the sides of the lyre, Hdt.4.192;
to s. tēs lexeōs dei mēte emmetron einai mēte arruthmonId.Rh.1408b21 (but ta s. tēs lexeōs the forms (modes) used in poetry, such as entreaty, threat, command, I

to s. tēs lexeōs dei mēte emmetron einai mēte arruthmonId.Rh.1408b21 (but ta s. tēs lexeōs the forms (modes) used in poetry, such as entreaty, threat, command, 

melos , eos, to,
2. music to which a song is set, tune, Arist.Po.1450a14; opp. rhuthmos, metron, Pl.Grg. 502c; opp. rhuthmos, rhēma, Id.Lg.656c;
3. melody of an instrument, “phormigx d' au phtheggoith' hieron m. ēde kai aulos

 Plat. Phaedo 66d

Plat. Laws 655a Athenian
Well said, my friend. But in, fact, while postures and tunes do exist in music,1 which deals with rhythm and harmony, so that one can rightly speak of a tune or posture being “rhythmical” or “harmonious,” one cannot rightly apply the choir masters metaphor “well-colored” to tune and posture; but one can use this language about the posture and tune of the brave man and the coward,

1 “Music” comprises both dance and song (including instrumental accompaniment), whether executed by single performers or by groups (khoreia). The “postures” are those of the dancer, the “tunes” those of the singer.


Callimachus   HYMN IV. TO DELOS 29

[1] What time or when, O my soul, wilt thou sing of holy Delos, nurse of Apollo? Surely all the Cyclades most holy of the isles that lie in the sea, are goodly theme of song. But Delos would win the foremost guerdon from the Muses, since she it was that bathed Apollo, the lord of minstrels, and swaddled him, and was the first to accept him for a god. Even as the Muses abhor him who sings not of Pimpleia1 so Phoebus abhors him who forgets Delos. To Delos no will I give her share of song, so that Cynthian2 Apollo may praise me for taking thought of his dear nurse.

They are strong by reason of sheltering towers, but Delos is strong by aid of Apollo. What defence is there more steadfast? Walls and stones may fall before the blast of Strymonian9 Boreas; but a god is unshaken for ever. Delos beloved, such is the champion that encompasses thee about! [28] Now if songs full many circle about thee, with what song shall I entwine thee? What is that which is pleasing unto thee to hear? Is it the tale how at the very first the mighty god10 smote the mountains with the three-forked sword which the Telchines11 fashioned for him, and wrought the islands in the sea, and from their lowest foundations lifted them all as with a lever and rolled them into the sea?

Poieo anything YOU make or compose. Thespesios divenly sounding, divinely sweet, “aoidēIl.2.600

hēdonē enjoyment, pleasure, first in Simon. pros . legein to speak so as to please another
en hēdonē esti tini it is a pleasure or delight to another, 3. Pl., desires after pleasure, pleasant lusts, X.Mem.1.2.23, Ep.Tit.3.3, al.

Titus 3:[3] For we were also once foolish, disobedient, deceived, serving various lusts and pleasures, living in malice and envy, hateful, and hating one another.

Xen. Mem. 1.2.23 How then can it be impossible for one who was prudent to lose his prudence, for one who was capable of just action to become incapable? To me indeed it seems that whatever is honourable, whatever is good in conduct is the result of training, and that this is especially true of prudence. For in the same body along with the soul are planted the pleasures which call to her: “Abandon prudence, and make haste to gratify us and the body.”

 

2Timothy 2:5 And if a man also strive for masteries,
        yet is he not crowned, except he strive lawfully.

g118.  athleo, ath-leh´-o; from a‡qloß athlos (a contest in the public lists); to contend in the competitive games: — strive.

athl-eō , . kata tēn agōnian Pl.Ti.19c a
agōn-ia , , A. contest, struggle for victory, 3. of the mind, agony, anguish, “en phobō kai pollē a.D.18.33,, Arist.Pr.869b6; “en tois tēs psukhēs phobois, elpisin, agōniais” 

Most of the struggle against clergy is to quench the lusts of the flesh. See Romans 12

Latin: Romans 12.1 obsecro itaque vos fratres per misericordiam Dei ut exhibeatis corpora vestra hostiamviventemsanctam Deo placentem rationabile obsequium vestrum
Rătĭōnābĭlis , e, adj. ratio (post-Aug.; = rationalis, which is in better use), I.  reasonable, rational: he pure milk of reason, id. 1 Pet. 2, 2: “sententia vera et rationabilis,
1Pet. 2:1 Wherefore laying aside all malice, and all guile, and hypocrisies, and envies, and all evil speakings,
1Pet. 2:2 As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby:
1Pet. 2:3 If so be ye have tasted that the Lord is gracious.

g97. adolos, ad´-ol-os; from 1 (as a negative particle}; and 1388; undeceitful, i.e. (figuratively) unadulterated: — sincere
g3050. logikos, log-ik-os´; from 3056; rational (“logical”): — reasonable, of the word.

g3056.logos, log´-os; from 3004; something said (including the thought);
Sententĭa , ae, f. for sentientia, from sentio,
I. a way of thinking, opinion, judgment, sentiment; a purpose, determination, decision, will, etc.
I. Transf., of words, discourse, etc., sense, meaning, signification, idea, notion, etc.

        1.
In gen., a thought expressed in words; a sentence, period: dum de singulis sententiis breviter disputo
thespesios (theos, root sep, espete): divinely uttered or uttering (thespesiē, ‘by divine decree,’ Il. 2.367), divine; aoidē, Il. 2.600; Seirēnes, ‘heavenlysinging,’ Od. 12.158 ; bēlos, ‘of heaven,’ Il. 1.591; then of anything prodigious, vast, wondrous, mighty, a storm, clamor, panic, etc.—Adv., thespesiōs, Il. 15.637.
aoid-ē a^], Att. contr. ōdē (q. v.), , : (aeidō):—
A song, whether:
2 act of singing, song,hoi d' eis himeroessan a. trepsamenoi18.304; “hup' orkhēthmō kai aoidēHes.Sc.282.
3.  thing sung, song,stonoessan a. hoi men ap' ethrēneonIl.24.721, cf. Od. 1.351, Hdt.2.79, Alc.Supp.4.24, Pi.N.11.18 (pl.), etc.; whether of joy or sorrow, cf. A.Eu.954 (lyr.) with S.Ant.883; “luras a.E.Med. 425(lyr.).
4. theme of song, person sung of,hina ēsi kai essomenoisin a.Od.8.580, cf. Thgn.252, Theoc.12.11; stugerē de t' a. esset' ep' anthrōpous Klutaimēstra] Od.24.200.
eppsdē, spell, incantation,okhēes ōkeiais . . anathrōskontes aoidaisA.R.4.42, cf. 59. Cf. ōdē. [Dissyll. in Hes.Th.48 (unless lēgousi t' aoidēs be read) and in Pi. l.c. (unless melizen be read).]
thespesios , a, on, also os, on E.Andr.296 (lyr.), Luc.Sacr.13: (perh. for thes-spesios, cf. theos, espon):—prop. of the voice,
A.  divinely sounding, divinely sweet, “aoidēIl.2.600; “SeirēnesOd.12.158; “epeaPi.I.4(3).39; “akhetasAr.Av.1095 (lyr.).
2  divinely uttered or decreed, dat. sg. fem. thespesiē as Adv., Il.2.367.
b.  oracular, “genosPi.P.12.13 (of the Graiae); “daphnaE. l.c.; th. hodos the way of divination, of Cassandra, A.Ag.1154 (lyr.); eukhais hupo th. with prayers to the gods, Pi. I.6(5).44.
II.  more than human: hence, awful, of natural phenomena, “th. nephosIl. 15.669; “akhlusOd.7.42; “lailaps9.68; marvellous, “kharis2.12; th. aōton, khalkos, 9.434, Il.2.457; th. odmē a smell divinely sweet, Od.9.211; osmē th. Hermipp.82.9; of human affairs, th. phuza, phobos, Il.9.2, 17.118; “ploutos2.670; “ēkhē8.159; “boēOd.24.49; “th. homilosTheoc. 15.66: also in Prose, “tekhnē th. tis kai hupsēlēPl.Euthd.289e; “th. biosId.R.365b; th. kai hēdeia diagōgē ib.558a; “sophoi kai th. andresId.Tht.151b, cf. Philostr.Dial.1; “phuseisId.VS2.9.2; “th. tēn gnōmēnLuc. Alex.4.
III. Adv. -iōs, th. ephobēthen they trembled unspeakably, Il.15.637: neut. thespesion as Adv., “th. hulanTheoc.25.70; also “apozei th. hōs hēduHdt.3.113; “ōdōdei th. hoionPlu.Alex.20; thespesiēthen divinely, “arērotaEmp.96.4. —Chiefly Ep., once in Hdt., twice in Trag. (lyr.), once in Ar. (lyr.).

Beasts.Clothed.Ape.html

Genesis.3.Serpo.gif

As the BEAST is a new style of music and SATYRIC drama, the Serpo in the garden and the Drakon is:

dra^kōn , dra^komenos ,
A.v. derkomai.
derkomai   hence, alive, living,zōntos  pur ophthalmoisi dedorkōs flashing fire from his eyes,

--drak-izō ,  A.play the buffoon, Gloss.
dra^keis , drakēnai , drakon , A.v. derkomai:—but draken: energei, prassei, is prob. f. l. for dedraken, Hsch.
geloi-astēs , ou, ho, A. jester, buffoon, 2, LXX Jb.31.5, Poll.5.128, prob. in Luc.Merc.Cond. 4.

drakōn [a^, ontos, ho: (prob. from derkomai, dra^kein, cf. Porph.Abst. 3.8):—
A.dragon, serpent, Il.11.39, al.; interchangeable with ophis, 12.202, 208, cf. Hes. Th.322, 825, Pi.N.1.40, A.Th.292 (lyr.); “aetos kai d. polemiaArist.HA609a4; perh. a water-snake, ib.602b25.
II. the constellation Draco, Arat.46, al., Man.2.69.
III. a sea-fish, the great weever, Epich.60, Arist.HA598a11, Hp.Vict.2.48.
IV. = kērukeion, prob. a wand with a serpent coiled round it, S.Fr.700 (cf. 701).

Job 31.5 "If I have walked with falsehood, And my foot has hurried to deceit

Vanity:
măgĭcus  artes, superstitiones,” magici, that were invoked by incantations
lingua,skilled in incantations, cantus,Juv. 6, 610: “magicae resonant ubi Memnone chordae,
kopr-ias , ou, ho, (kopros) in pl., A.buffoons, a word first used under the Roman emperors, D.C.50.28, 73.6: Lat. copreae, Suet. Tib.61. (Perh. so called because ek koprias anairethentes, or because of their obscenity.)


Christ in Isaiah 30
and Jesus casting out the musical minstrels LIKE DUNG is based on the fact that the same official regulated the flute-player prostitutes as well as the dunghill

A Heretic marked by self-pleasure in Romans 15 is defined as singing, playing, acting or dancing to make the lambs dumb do the priest can LIFT THEM UP TO CUT THEIR THROATS.
kopr-ia , , (cf. koperra) A.dunghill 

A.
dunghill, Semon.7.6 (pl.), Stratt.43, Arist.Mir.845a5 (pl.), LXX Jb.2.8, Asclep. ap. Gal.12.634, etc.; in Egypt, rubbish-heap, PRyl.2.162.17 (ii A. D.), etc.; anaireisthai apo koprias, of foundlings, PGnom.238, cf. 115 (ii A. D.), POxy.37i7 (i A. D.).
II. refuse, “en seismati koskinou diamenei k.LXX Si.27.4; manure, Ev.Luc.13.8 (v.l. kopria).
anaireō

anaireō
, A.take up, anelontes apo khthonos having raised the victim from the ground, so as to cut its throat. 2. take up and carry off, bear away, II. make away with, destroy, of men, kill, 2. of things, abrogate, annul laws.  blasphēmias
III. appoint, ordain, of oracle's answer to inquiry, [the musician]
take up for oneself, take up, pick up INFILTRATE AND STEAL THE PROPERTY AND FLOCK OF OTHERS
2. take up and carry off, snatch,

The "psallo" word was a MARK in that the prophesied SOP Jesus had fed to Judas has the same root meaning as psallo.  Psallo is an Apollo, Abaddon or Apollyon plucking the bow strings to kill you or plucking his lyre-string to molest you (3 male companions).  When used of plucking or smiting a musical instrument ALL such words have a warfare or sexual smiting sense:

WHAT IS A PLAGUE:  PLESSO 3. strike or stamp as one does a coin, Kuprios kharaktēr . .
         en gunaikeiois tupois
peplēktai  Strike a string with a KEY,
        b. sting
, plêgeisa hupo skorpiou  Plato, Euthydemus   S. Fr.37, V. an engine of war for discharging arrow
4. of musical sounds, houtôsi plêgenta houtôs ephthenxato ta phônêenta 
EPHTHENXATO--trumpet (thunder), flute, lyre, Phormigx (ABADDON'S instrument), melody in a holy place, CLAPPING HANDS

EXAMPLE: Plato, Euthydemus

[289e] For not only do these speech-writers themselves, when I am in their company, impress me as prodigiously clever, Cleinias, but their art itself seems so exalted as to be almost inspired.  However, this is not surprising; for it is a part of the sorcerer's art,



Genesis 3:1 Now the serpent was more subtil than any beast of the field which the LORD God had made. And he said unto the woman, Yea, hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden?

Genesis 3.1  sed et serpens erat callidior cunctis animantibus terrae quae fecerat Dominus Deus qui dixit ad mulierem cur praecepit vobis Deus ut non comederetis de omni ligno paradisi


5175 nâchâsh naw-khawsh' From H5172 ; a snake (from its hiss):—serpent.

H5172 nâchash naw-khash' A primitive root; properly to hiss, that is, whisper a (magic) spell; generally to prognosticate:— X certainly, divine, enchanter, (use) X enchantment, learn by experience, X indeed, diligently observe.

Serpo
, of things, to move slowly or imperceptibly, to creep along, proceed gradually,
Of disease, etc.: “si ulcus latius atque altius serpit,gradually spreads,serpentes quasdam (bestias), quasdam esse gradientes,”  “chamaeleon,
 Fire: “exsistit sacer ignis et urit corpore serpens,slowly spreading,  canam, qui leniter
(cf.:sermones Repentes per humum,
A creeping LOUSE

Canam, exsistit sacer ignis et urit corpore serpens,slowly spreading fire, bring to destruction, reduce to ruin, destroy
DIONYSIACA BOOK 1
[11] Bring me the fennel, rattle the cymbals, ye Muses!
        put in my hand the wand of Dionysos whom I sing:
        but bring me a partner for your dance in the neighbouring island of Paros,1
        Proteus of many turns, that he may appear in all his diversity of shapes,
        since I twang my harp to a diversity of songs.
        For if, as a serpent [drakōn], he should glide along his winding trail,
        I will sing my god’s achievement, how with ivy-wreathed wand
        he destroyed the horrid hosts of Giants serpent-haired.
Agmĕna  crowded into a compact mass, Of a snake winding onwards Eap. of a company of persons, a multitude, troop, crowd, number, band
1. An army, troop, band, multitude: clāmor  —Of things, noise, sound, din căvus , “tibia,id. 2, 620:
bucina = A. A war-trumpet  b. = inanis, vain, empty: “gloria,
Tībĭa , a pipe, flute (orig. made of bone; curva choros indixit tibia Bacchi,modulate canentes tibiae,
Bestĭa , 2. As a term of reproach (cf. belua and our beast): “mala tu es bestia,Plaut. Bacch. 1, 1, 21; id. Poen. 5, 5, 13.—And, humorously, of the odor of the armpits (cf. ala and caper), Cat. 69, 8.—
căno , cĕcĭni, cantum (ancient I.imp. cante = canite,
once canituri,Vulg. Apoc. 8, 13  to utter melodious notes, to sing, sound, play.
tibicen  cithara, crowing of a cock: “galli victi silere solent, canere victores,to crow,
to practice magic, to charm, Galli is a word for a Catamite: priest of the Mother Godesses.

"Kenite" is a rendition of Hebrew According to Gesenius, the name is derived from the name Cain (קַיִן Qayin).[5] According to A. H. Sayce, the name `Kenite', Qéní, is identical an Aramaic word meaning `a smith', which in its turn is a cognate of Hebrew Quayin, with the meaning `a lance'.

H7014 qayin kah'-yin The same as H7013 (with a play upon the affinity to H7069 ); Kajin, the name of the first child, also of a place in Palestine, and of an Oriental tribe:--Cain, Kenite (-s).
H7013
qayin kah'-yin From H6969 in the original sense of fixity; a lance (as striking fast): spear.

H6969 qun koon A primitive root; to strike a musical note, that is, chant or wail (at a funeral): lament, mourning woman.

BEGUILED IS:   dē-cĭpĭo , capio, primarily signifies to catch away, catch up, seize an animal while running, fleeing,: “amatorem amicae decipiunt vitia,Hor . S. 1, 3, 38.—

The newest song which the singers have, (Odyssey)...
"they will be afraid that he may be praising, not some new songs, but a
new kind of song; and this ought not to be praised, or conceived to be the meaning of the poet; for any musical innovation is full of danger in the whole State, and ought to be prohibited. 
"So Damon tells me, and I can quite believe him; he says that when modes of music change, the fundamental laws of the State always change with them..." 
"Then," I said, "our guardians must lay the foundations of their fortress in music?"
"Yes," I replied, 'in the form of amusement: and at first sight it always appears harmless
'." (The Great Dialogs, Plato, Classic edition, p. 312)

lēnis , I. soft, smooth, mild, gentle, easy, calm. sensus judicat dulce,
dulcis  II. Trop., agreeable, delightful, pleasant, charming, soft, flattering.
orator,Cic. Off. 1, 1, 3; cf. “of orators or writers,” “carmen,id. 12, 10, 33: poëmata, Hor. A. P. 99
carmen , a tune, song, air, lay, strain, note, sound, both vocal and instrumental
per me (sc. inem) concordant carmina nervis
Christ marked the king of Tyre as "lucifer" which He identified as a "singing and harp-playing prostitute in the garden of Eden." So the anti-God morning star is prophetically identified as the enemy of the LOGOS or true Day Star.  LOGOS is identified as the REGULATIVE PRINCIPLE.

o is Abaddon or yon: his musical worship team or muses are marked in the literature as dirty adulteresses, John calls them SORCERERS and says they will be cast alive into the Lake of Fire.

Quint. Inst. 12 10.33 Consequently the Greek language is so much more agreeable in sound than the Latin, that our poets, whenever they wish their verse to be especially harmonious, adorn it with Greek words.

pŏēma
, a composition in verse, a poem. Poësis est perpetuum argumentum e id. A. P. 416:scribere,
pangere,Hor. Ep. 1, 18, 40;
Hor. Ars 416
Orpheus, the priest and interpreter of the gods. Amphion too, the builder of the Theban wall, was said to give the stones motion with the sound of his lyre, and to lead them whithersoever he would, by engaging persuasion. This was deemed wisdom of yore, to distinguish the public from private weal; things sacred from things profane;.. Oracles were delivered in poetry, and the economy of life pointed out, and the favor of sovereign princes was solicited by Pierian strains, games were instituted, and a [cheerful] period put to the tedious labors of the day; [this I remind you of,] lest haply you should be ashamed of the lyric muse, and o the god of song....he who sings the Pythian strains,2 was first a learner, and in awe of a master. But [in poetry] it is now enough for a man to say of himself:— "I make admirable verses: a murrain seize the hindmost: it is scandalous for me to be outstripped, and fairly to acknowledge that I am ignorant of that which I never learned."
2 “Pythia canticaHor. Ars 414, songs like the hymns which were sung in honor of o [Abaddon, yon], by the chorus in some comedies. A player, called Pythaules, played during the intervals when the chorus left off singing.

Prometheus dulci laborum decipitur sono, is beguiled of his sufferings (i. e. forgets his sufferings, being beguiled with sweet melody), Hor. Od. 2, 13, 38.— [ALL music terms point to being beguiled or SORCERY]

Hor. Od. 2.13
How near dark Pluto's court I stood,
And Aeacus' judicial throne,
The blest seclusion of the good,

And Sappho [Lesbian], with sweet lyric moan
Bewailing her ungentle sex,
And thee, Alcaeus, louder far
Chanting thy tale of woful wrecks,
Of woful exile, woful war!

In sacred awe the silent dead
Attend on each: but when the song
Of combat tells and tyrants fled,
Keen ears, press'd shoulders, closer throng.

What marvel, when at those sweet airs
The hundred-headed beast spell-bound
Each black ear droops, and Furies' hairs
Uncoil their serpents at the sound?

Prometheus too and Pelops' sire
In listening lose the sense of woe;
Orion hearkens to the lyre,
And lets the lynx and lion go.


THE SERPENT AS MUSICAL ENCHANTER(ESS)
IS WISE BUT GOD HIDES FROM THE WISE OR SOPHISTS: SPEAKERS, SINGERS, INSTRUMENT PLAYERS, DANCERS, ACTORS

Callĭdus , a, um, adj. calleo, I.that is taught wisdom by experience and practice, shrewd, expert, experienced, adroit, skilful:  “in disputando,Quint. 12, 2, 14
In reference to art, excelling in art, skilful, Hor. S. 2, 3, 23-sŏno

dis-pŭto ,
isti in eo disputant, Contaminari non decere fabulas,
Contamino
[Chalal or polluting the Rest means play the flute, steal other people's property, pollute or prostitute]

fābŭla
, “poëticae
1.
Most freq., a dramatic poem, drama, play (syn.: “ludus, cantus, actio, etc.): in full, fabula scaenica,Amm. 28, 1, 4; “or, theatralis,
atque carminibus non a veritate modo,
Prov.: Lupus in fabula (like the Engl., talk of the devil, and he will appear), of a person who comes just as we are talking about him
THE SERPENT OR BEAST IS
Herpō , herpein es muthon, pros ōdas, Id.Hel.316, Cyc.423 ;
herpon tois odousi thērion an animal that walks on its teeth, 
Theiron or Beast is a New Style of Music of Drama suddenly attacking.
b. of things, events, etc., “herpei anta sidarō to kalōs kitharisdēn

A Beautiful Guitar Player
ki^thar-izō , Att. fut. - Antiph. 141: (kitharis):—
A.play the cithara, “phormiggi . . himeroen kitharizeIl.18.570, Hes.Sc.202; “lurē d' eraton kitharizōnh.Merc.423; “herpei anta sidarō to kalōs kitharisdenAlcm.35, cf. X.Smp.3.1, Oec.2.13; “adein kai k.Phld.Mus.7 K.; kitharizein ouk epistamai I am not a 'high-brow', Ar.V.989, cf. 959; “arkhaion ein' ephaske to k.Id.Nu.1357: prov., onos kitharizein peirōmenos, like onos pros luran (v. lura), Luc.Pseudol.7; to kitharizomenon music composed for the cithara, Plu.2.1144d.
onos , ho and , 7. onōn hubristoteros, of wanton behaviour, X.An.5.8.3 ; “krithōsēs onouS.Fr.876.
9. o. eis akhura, of one who gets what he wants, Diogenian.6.91 ; onou gnathos, of a glutton, ib. 100.
10. o. en melissais, of one who has got into a scrape, Crates Com.36 ; but o. en pithēkois, of extreme ugliness, Men.402.8 ; o. en murō 'a clown at a feast', Suid.

phorm-igx , iggos, ,
A.lyre, freq. in Hom., esp. as the instrument of Apollo, “phormiggos perikalleos hēn ekh' ApollōnIl.1.603, cf. 24.63, Od.17.270, Hes.Sc.203; of Achilles, “phrena terpomenon phormiggi ligeiē kalē daidaleēIl.9.186; with seven strings (after Terpander's time), heptaktupos, heptaglōssos, Pi.P.2.71, N.5.24; “antipsallōn elephantodeton ph.Ar.Av.219 (anap.).
2. ph. akhordos, metaph. for a bow, Arist.Rh.1413a1.

ēnthon, etc., “eis to hieron
Even a Levite was to be executed if he entered, sang or played in a holy place.
Muthos  2. public speech, “m. andressi melēseiOd.1.358; “muthoisin skoliois” 
muthoisi kekasthai to be skilled in speech, OppositeLOGOS
LOGOS includes the Regulative Principle: is the opposite of singing, poetry or music.
Muthos , ho, A.word, speech
2.public speech, “m. andressi melēseiOd.1.358; “muthoisin skoliois [crooked race]
either of a story which never comes to an end, or of one told to those who do not listen, 
Woe.to.Scribes.Pharisees.Hypocrites.html





Matthew 23 Hypocrites are  speakers, singers and instrument players.
Hupo-kri^tēs
I. interpreter or expounder, II. in Att., one who plays a part on the stage, actor,
2. of an orator, poikilos hu. kai perittos (of Dem.) Phld.Rh.1.197 S.; one who delivers, recites, declaimer,epōnTim.Lex. s.v. rhapsōdoi; rhapsodist,
3.metaphor., pretender, dissembler, hypocrite, LXX Jb.34.30, 36.13, Ev.Matt.23.13,
Poikilos III. metaph., changeful, diversified, manifold,
2. of Art, p. humnos a song of changeful strain or full of diverse art, Pi.O.6.87; “poikilon kitharizōnId.N.4.14; “dedaidalmenoi pseudesi poikilois muthoiId.O.1.29; of style, “lexis poiētikōtera kai p.Isoc.15.47 (Comp.); “skhēmatismoi
c. of persons and things, subtle, artful, wily,
Sophos , ē, on, A. skilled in any handicraft or art, clever,
Margites Fr.2; but in this sense mostly of poets and musicians, Pi.O.1.9, P.1.42, 3.113; en kithara s. E.IT1238
en oiōnois, kithara, E. IT662, 1238


The command is to SPEAK the ODES
-lexis , eōs, h(, (legō B) A. speech, OPPOSITE. ōdē, Pl.Lg.816d; l. ē praxis speech or action, Id.R.396c; ho tropos tēs l. ib.400d; ta lexei dēloumena orders given by word of mouth,

-ōdē , , contr. for aoidē,
en tais ōdais kai melesinR.399c, cf. 398c; OPPOSITE. lexis,

Psallo has never and can never speak of musical melody.  If someone said:

SPEAK to the students about the rules of grammar
SING and WHISTLE in the bathroom.

Is that too hard to understand? According to Paul if you tamper with the Word God sends strong delusions so that you believe your own lies. The results are Lying Wonders: lying wonders are rhetoric, singing, playing, juggling or acting AS a religious act--that legalism word.

Notice that ODE must include melos is you intend to SING.
MELOS or melody B. esp. musical member, phrase: hence, song, strain, Cratin.236; melē, ta, lyric poetry, choral songs, opp. Epic or Dramatic verse,
2. music to which a song is set, tune, Arist.Po.1450a14; OPPOSITE. rhuthmos, metron, Pl.Grg. 502c
3. melody of an instrument, “phormigx d' au phtheggoith' hieron m. ēde kai aulosOPPOSITE. rhuthmos, rhēma,






Hor. Carm. 1.17
The pleasures of Lucretilis
Tempt Faunus from his Grecian seat;
He keeps my little goats in bliss
Apart from wind, and rain, and heat.


 
căpella , ae, f. dim. caper; cf.: puer, puella,
I. a she-goat. also a dog.
2. As a term of reproach, a dirty fellow, Amm. 17, 12; 24, 8 (cf. canicula).—
II. A star on the left shoulder of the constellation Auriga (usu. called capra), Plin. 18, 26, 66, § 248; rising in the rainy season; hence, sidus pluviale capellae, Ov. M. 3, 594: “signum pluviale,id. F. 5, 113.
signum  2. A sign, signal; a watchword, password, given by a wind-instrument, by the tessera, or otherwise

In safety rambling o'er the sward
For arbutes and for thyme they peer,
The ladies of the unfragrant lord,
Nor vipers, green with venom, fear,



cŏlū^bra ,
I. a female serpent; and in gen., a serpent, snake, Lucil., Turp., and Varr. ap. Non. p. 201, 22 sq.; Hor. C. 1, 17, 8; id. S. 1, 8, 42; Ov. M. 6, 559; Juv. 5, 103; Cels. 5, 27, 3; Col. 10, 230; Plin. 32, 5, 19, § 53.—As an attributive of the hair of the Furies, Medusa, etc. (v. coluber), Ov. M. 4, 474; 4, 491; 4, 783; Luc. 9, 634.— “Hence, prov.: quas tu edes colubras?” i. e. art thou frantic? Plaut. Stich. 2, 1, 50 Ritschl N. cr.; and: “colubra restem non parit,” i.e. like produces like, the thorn does not produce grapes, Petr. 45, 9.
Nor savage wolves, of Mars' own breed,
My Tyndaris, while Ustica's dell
Is vocal with the silvan reed,
And music thrills the limestone fell
.


per-sŏno A. To sound through and through, to resound  B. To make a sound on a musical instrument, to sound, play: “citharā Iopas Personat,Verg. A. 1, 741: “cymbalis,Vulg. 1 Par. 16, 5: “buccinis,id. Jos. 6, 13.—
lŭpus , i, m. kindred with lukos;
Lukos A. wolf, Il.16.156, 352lukou ptera, of things that are not, 'pigeon's milk', Suid.; hōs l. khanōn, of vain expectation, “l. kekhēnōsAr.Lys.629; prin ken l. oin humenaioi, of an impossibility, Id.Pax1076, 1112, cf. Il.22.263; hōs lukoi arn' agapōsin, of treacherous or unnatural love, humenaion aeidōn wedding song.
VI. nickname of paiderastai,  cf. Pl.Phdr. 241d.
        paiderast-ēs , ou, ho, A. lover of boys, mostly in bad sense, Ar.Ach.265(lyr.), X.An.7.4.7, Pl. Smp.192b,
Heaven is my guardian; heaven approves
A blameless life, by song made sweet;
Come hither, and the fields and groves
Their horn shall empty at your feet.


in-nŏcens ,
Cōpĭa , ac, f.
I. The goddess of abundance, Plaut. Ps. 2, 4, 46: “bona,Ov. M. 9, 88: “opulenta,Hor. C. 1, 17, 16; id. C. S. 60 al.

Mūsa, = Mousa, I. a muse, one of the goddesses of poetry, music, and the other liberal arts.
Cor ( The heart, as the seat of feeling, emotion, the seat of wisdom, understanding, heart, mind, judgment,

cornu , the emblem of fruitfulness and abundance  b. A bugle-horn, a horn, trumpet (cornua, quod ea, quae nunc sunt ex aere, tunc fiebant bubulo e cornu Connected with tubae, Cic. Sull. 5, 17; Tac. A. 1, 68;

venerunt capiti cornua sera meo,Ov. Am. 3, 11,:
Hence Bacchus, as a giver of courage, is represented with horns, Tib. 2, 1, 3; Hor. C. 2, 19, 30; v. Bacchus, I.; cf. of a river-god, 
Here, shelter'd by a friendiy tree,
In Teian measures you shall sing
Bright Circe [church] and Penelope,
Love-smitten both by one sharp sting.

Hor. Carm. 1.1 To me the artist's meed, the ivy wreathIs very heaven: me the sweet cool of woods, Where Satyrs frolic with the Nymphs, secludes From rabble rout, so but Euterpe's breath

Fail not the flute, nor Polyhymnia fly
Averse from stringing new the Lesbian lyre. O, write my name among that minstrel choir, And my proud head shall strike upon the sky!

Lesb-iazō , A. do like the Lesbian women, Lat.fellare, Ar.Ra. 1308,
cănīcŭla  canis.(and music)
I. A small dog or bitch, Plin. 32, 7, 26, § 79.—Hence,
B. Trop., of a passionate, quarrelsome woman A. Canis Minor, the lesser dogstar, in the mouth of the constellation Canis, q. v., Plin. 2, 47, 47, § 123; 18, 28, 68, § 268: “flagrans,Hor. C. 3, 13, 9: “flammans,Manil. 5, 207: “rubra,Hor. S. 2, 5, 39: “sitiens,Ov. A. A. 2, 231: “insana,
Flammo , B. Trop., to inflame, kindle, incite: “sic donis vulgum laudumque cupidine flammat,

CircēKirkē, the daughter of the Sun and of Perse or Perseis, sister of Æetes, a sea-nymph, distinguished for her magic arts, whose abode, after her flight from Colchis, was said to be in the region of the promontory of Circeii, in Latium. magical, poisoning
Lesbos (-us ), D. Lesbĭ-as , ădis, f., = Lesbias, a Lesbian woman: “Lesbiadum turba,Ov. H. 15, 16: E. Lesbis , ĭdis, adj. f., = Lesbis, Lesbian: “Lesbida cum domino seu tulit ille lyram,
Here shall you quaff beneath the shade
Sweet Lesbian draughts that injure none,
Nor fear lest Mars the realm invade

 
Lesbius adj , Lesbios, of Lesbos, Lesbian: civis, Alcaeus, H.: plectrum, Alcaic, H.: pes, the Sapphic meter, H.: vinum, H.

Mars a. Of or belonging to Mars: “lupus,sacred to Mars, Verg. A. 9, 566; cf.: Martius lupus, integer et intactus, gentis nos Martiae et conditoris nostri admonuit, descended from Mars
Of Semele's Thyonian son,
Lest Cyrus on a foe too weak
Lay the rude hand of wild excess,
His passion on your chaplet wreak,
Or spoil your undeserving dress
con-tĭnĕo 2. With the access. idea of hindering, preventing motion, to keep, keep still, detain, restrain, repress, enclose.




Poet.: “Nasonis carmina rapti,” i. e. torn from his home, borne far away, Ov. P. 4, 16, 1; cf. id. H. 13, 9; Stat. S. 3, 5, 6. —

Hor. Carm. 1.17
The pleasures of Lucretilis
Tempt Faunus from his Grecian seat;
He keeps my little goats in bliss
Apart from wind, and rain, and heat.


 
căpella , ae, f. dim. caper; cf.: puer, puella,
I. a she-goat. also a dog.
2. As a term of reproach, a dirty fellow, Amm. 17, 12; 24, 8 (cf. canicula).—
II. A star on the left shoulder of the constellation Auriga (usu. called capra), Plin. 18, 26, 66, § 248; rising in the rainy season; hence, sidus pluviale capellae, Ov. M. 3, 594: “signum pluviale,id. F. 5, 113.
signum  2. A sign, signal; a watchword, password, given by a wind-instrument, by the tessera, or otherwise

In safety rambling o'er the sward
For arbutes and for thyme they peer,
The ladies of the unfragrant lord,
Nor vipers, green with venom, fear,


cŏlū^bra ,
I. a female serpent; and in gen., a serpent, snake, Lucil., Turp., and Varr. ap. Non. p. 201, 22 sq.; Hor. C. 1, 17, 8; id. S. 1, 8, 42; Ov. M. 6, 559; Juv. 5, 103; Cels. 5, 27, 3; Col. 10, 230; Plin. 32, 5, 19, § 53.—As an attributive of the hair of the Furies, Medusa, etc. (v. coluber), Ov. M. 4, 474; 4, 491; 4, 783; Luc. 9, 634.— “Hence, prov.: quas tu edes colubras?” i. e. art thou frantic? Plaut. Stich. 2, 1, 50 Ritschl N. cr.; and: “colubra restem non parit,” i.e. like produces like, the thorn does not produce grapes, Petr. 45, 9.
Nor savage wolves, of Mars' own breed,
My Tyndaris, while Ustica's dell
Is vocal with the silvan reed,
And music thrills the limestone fell.


per-sŏno A. To sound through and through, to resound  B. To make a sound on a musical instrument, to sound, play: “citharā Iopas Personat,Verg. A. 1, 741: “cymbalis,Vulg. 1 Par. 16, 5: “buccinis,id. Jos. 6, 13.—
lŭpus , i, m. kindred with lukos;
Lukos A. wolf, Il.16.156, 352lukou ptera, of things that are not, 'pigeon's milk', Suid.; hōs l. khanōn, of vain expectation, Eub.15.11, cf. Ar.Fr.337, Euphro 1.31; “l. kekhēnōsAr.Lys.629; prin ken l. oin humenaioi, of an impossibility, Id.Pax1076, 1112, cf. Il.22.263; hōs lukoi arn' agapōsin, of treacherous or unnatural love, humenaion aeidōn wedding song.
VI. nickname of paiderastai, AP12.250 (Strat.), cf. Pl.Phdr. 241d.
paiderast-ēs , ou, ho, A. lover of boys, mostly in bad sense, Ar.Ach.265(lyr.), X.An.7.4.7, Pl. Smp.192b,
Heaven is my guardian; heaven approves
A blameless life, by song made sweet;
Come hither, and the fields and groves
Their horn shall empty at your feet.


in-nŏcens ,

Cōpĭa , ac, f.
I. The goddess of abundance, Plaut. Ps. 2, 4, 46: “bona,Ov. M. 9, 88: “opulenta,Hor. C. 1, 17, 16; id. C. S. 60 al.

Mūsa , ae, f., = Mousa, I. a muse, one of the goddesses of poetry, music, and the other liberal arts.
Cor (ŏ, The heart, as the seat of feeling, emotion, the seat of wisdom, understanding, heart, mind, judgment,

cornū , the emblem of fruitfulness and abundance b. A bugle-horn, a horn, trumpet (cornua, quod ea, quae nunc sunt ex aere, tunc fiebant bubulo e cornu Connected with tubae, Cic. Sull. 5, 17; Tac. A. 1, 68;

venerunt capiti cornua sera meo,Ov. Am. 3, 11,:
Hence Bacchus, as a giver of courage, is represented with horns, Tib. 2, 1, 3; Hor. C. 2, 19, 30; v. Bacchus, I.; cf. of a river-god, I. B. 2. c. supra.
Here, shelter'd by a friendiy tree,
In Teian measures you shall sing
Bright Circe [church] and Penelope,
Love-smitten both by one sharp sting.

Hor. Carm. 1.1 To me the artist's meed, the ivy wreathIs very heaven: me the sweet cool of woods, Where Satyrs frolic with the Nymphs, secludes From rabble rout, so but Euterpe's breath

Fail not the flute, nor Polyhymnia fly
Averse from stringing new the Lesbian lyre. O, write my name among that minstrel choir, And my proud head shall strike upon the sky!

Lesb-iazō , A. do like the Lesbian women, Lat.fellare, Ar.Ra. 1308,
cănīcŭla , ae, f. dim. canis.(and music)
I. A small dog or bitch, Plin. 32, 7, 26, § 79.—Hence,
B. Trop., of a passionate, quarrelsome woman A. Canis Minor, the lesser dogstar, in the mouth of the constellation Canis, q. v., Plin. 2, 47, 47, § 123; 18, 28, 68, § 268: “flagrans,Hor. C. 3, 13, 9: “flammans,Manil. 5, 207: “rubra,Hor. S. 2, 5, 39: “sitiens,Ov. A. A. 2, 231: “insana,
Flammo , B. Trop., to inflame, kindle, incite: “sic donis vulgum laudumque cupidine flammat,

CircēKirkē, the daughter of the Sun and of Perse or Perseis, sister of Æetes, a sea-nymph, distinguished for her magic arts, whose abode, after her flight from Colchis, was said to be in the region of the promontory of Circeii, in Latium. magical, poisoning
Lesbos (-us ), D. Lesbĭ-as , ădis, f., = Lesbias, a Lesbian woman: “Lesbiadum turba,Ov. H. 15, 16: E. Lesbis , ĭdis, adj. f., = Lesbis, Lesbian: “Lesbida cum domino seu tulit ille lyram,
Here shall you quaff beneath the shade
Sweet Lesbian draughts that injure none,
Nor fear lest Mars the realm invade
 
Lesbius adj , Lesbios, of Lesbos, Lesbian: civis, Alcaeus, H.: plectrum, Alcaic, H.: pes, the Sapphic meter, H.: vinum, H.

Mars a. Of or belonging to Mars: “lupus,sacred to Mars, Verg. A. 9, 566; cf.: Martius lupus, integer et intactus, gentis nos Martiae et conditoris nostri admonuit, descended from Mars
Of Semele's Thyonian son,
Lest Cyrus on a foe too weak
Lay the rude hand of wild excess,
His passion on your chaplet wreak,
Or spoil your undeserving dress
con-tĭnĕo 2. With the access. idea of hindering, preventing motion, to keep, keep still, detain, restrain, repress, enclose.



Aristoph. Frogs 1296
Dionysus

What is this phlattothrat? Is it from Marathon, or
where did you assemble these songs of a rope-twister?
phlattothrat and phlattothrattophlattothrat , Com. words in Ar. Ra.1296, 1286; meant to parody an empty high-flown style—'sound and fury signifying nothing'.

melos , eos, to, 2. [select] music to which a song is set, tune, Arist.Po.1450a14; opp. rhuthmos, metron, Pl.Grg. 502c; opp. rhuthmos, rhēma, Id.Lg.656c; Krētikon, Karikon, Iōnikon m.,
3. [select] melody of an instrument, “phormigx d' au phtheggoith' hieron m. ēde kai aulos
esp. of lyric poetry, “to Arkhilokhou m.Pi.O.9.1; en melei poieein to write in lyric strain, Hdt.5.95, cf. 2.135; “en melei ē tini allō metrōPl.R.607d

Aeschylus
Well, to a fine place from a fine place did I
bring them, lest I be seen garnering from the same meadow as Phrynichos.
But this guy gets them from everywhere, from little whores,
Meletus' drinking songs (skolion), Carian flute solos,
Dirges, dances. This will all be made clear immediately.
Someone bring in a lyre. And yet, what need
of a lyre for this guy? Where's the girl who clacks the castanets? Hither, Muse of Euripides,
for whom these songs are appropriate to sing.

Dionysus
This Muse never did the Lesbian thing, oh no..




Hor. Carm. 1.18

Varus, are your trees in planting? put in none before the vine,
In the rich domain of Tibur, by the walls of Catilus;
There's a power above that hampers all that sober brains design,
And the troubles man is heir to thus are quell'd, and only thus.
Who can talk of want or warfare when the wine is in his head,
Not of thee, good father Bacchus, and of Venus fair and bright?
But should any dream of licence, there's a lesson may be read,
How 'twas wine that drove the Centaurs with the Lapithae to fight.
And the Thracians too may warn us; truth and falsehood, good and ill,
How they mix them, when the wine-god's hand is heavy on them laid!
Never, never, gracious Bacchus, may I move thee 'gainst thy will,
Or uncover what is hidden in the verdure of thy shade!
Silence thou thy savage cymbals, and the Berecyntine horn;
In their train Self-love still follows, dully, desperately blind,
And Vain-glory, towering upwards in its emptyheaded scorn,
And the Faith that keeps no secrets, with a window in its mind.
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