Revelation 17 18 Mother of Harlots or Worship Musicians

Revelation 17, Revelation 18. Mystery, Babylon the Great was the worship of the starry host by Israel when they fell into musical idolatry at Mount Sinai.  Jerusalem therefore became the great Babylon.  

This is the lost cord or the never ending melody: I do word mining and chase words from one ancient text to another. This is not required to grasp that the Church of Christ is no venue for professional performing artists. However, as you run from one document to another this will cause you to quit preaching philosophical or proof-text sermons and listening to the whiney-piney praise singers as one of the mosnt ancient, superstitious and legalistic professions.

This paper presents links to word definitions and to the Greek and Latin literature for a fuller understanding of the word CRAFTSMEN which are ministers of the Babylonian mother of harlots religious system.  This was as it was in the beginning, during all of the history of the Bible and prophesied in Revelation 17-18 of the hostile taking captive of the church organized as a school of the Bible by professional performing artists.  As the serpent in the garden is defined as the singing and harp playing prostitute and during the final period of captivity the driving purpose is to silence the Word of God where the Scribes and Pharisees of Jesus time murdered God's Scribes or Bible writers and taught the doctrines of men: that allowed them to take the free water of the Word (Isa 55) and perform the new doctrines in order to steal the homes of widows.

This is a very quick collection of LINKS to the ancient literature as the only way to defined the commercial and hostile confiscation of the church.  I will clean it up in time but you can click on any of the BLUE links and do your own word mining.  This will give you the only warning to flee Babylon by recognizing when the "locusts" or muses working for Apollo or Abaddon or Apollyon are UNLEASHED to separate the MARKS people have placed on their mind and work.

Remember that there are TWO THREADS running through the history of Israel just as there will always be two threads.  The evil thread was the Civil-Military-Clergy complex which regulated people by the force of the Military Warrior Levites under the king and commanders of the army. The spiritual thread was quarantined to the Synagogue (Qahal) beginning as the church in the wilderness as a School of the Word only.  Those two threads continue with a very tiny ekklesia or synagogue of Christ clearly limited to being the same school of the Bible. It is clear that the king, kingdom, Temple, clergy, sacrifices and exorcists music was IMPOSED upon that majority of Israelites culmination of the captivity and destruction of most of them.

Jesus made it clear that not all of those who came out of Abraham were of the SPIRITUAL THREAD.  Paul notes that:
Gal. 4:22 For it is written, that Abraham had two sons, the one by a bondmaid, the other by a freewoman.
Gal. 4:23 But he who was of the bondwoman was born after the flesh;
        but he of the freewoman was by promise.
Gal. 4:24 Which things are an allegory:
        for these are the two covenants; the one from the mount Sinai, which gendereth to bondage, which is Agar.
Gal. 4:25 For this Agar is mount Sinai in Arabia,
        and answereth to Jerusalem [Mother] which now is, and is in bondage with her children.
Gal. 4:26 But Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all.
Gal. 4:27 For it is written, Rejoice, thou barren that bearest not; break forth and cry,
        thou that travailest not: for the desolate hath many more children than she which hath an husband.
Gal. 4:28 Now we, brethren, as Isaac was, are the children of promise.
Gal. 4:29 But as then he that was born after the flesh
        persecuted him that was born after the Spirit, even so it is now.
Gal. 4:30 Nevertheless what saith the scripture?
        Cast out the bondwoman and her son:
        for the son of the bondwoman shall not be heir with the son of the freewoman.
Gal. 4:31 So then, brethren, we are not children of the bondwoman, but of the free.
The BONDAGE THREAD headquartered in Jerusalem and therefore the Mother of Harlots began in the earthly Jerusalem but probably means those who say they are Jews but are not.
Hear the word of the Lord, ye rulers of Sodom; give ear unto the law of our God, ye people of Gomorrah. Isaiah 1:10

To what purpose is the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? saith the Lord:
        I am full of the burnt offerings of rams, and the fat of fed beasts;
        and I delight not in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he goats. Isaiah 1:11

When ye come to appear before me,
        who hath required this at your hand, to tread my courts? Isaiah 1:12

Ezek. 23:2 Son of man, there were two women, the daughters of one mother:
Ezek. 23:3 And they committed whoredoms in Egypt; they committed whoredoms in their youth:
        there were their breasts pressed, and there they bruised the teats of their virginity.
Ezek. 23:4 And the names of them were Aholah the elder, and Aholibah her sister:
        and they were mine, and they bare sons and daughters.
        Thus were their names; Samaria is Aholah, and Jerusalem Aholibah.

Ezek. 23:5 And Aholah [Jerusalem] played the harlot when she was mine; and
        she doted on her lovers,
        on the Assyrians her neighbours,

        Doted: 5689. agab, aw-gab´; a primitive root; to breathe after, i.e. to love (sensually): dote, lover.

Ezek. 23:6 Which were clothed with blue, captains and rulers, all of them desirable young men,
        horsemen riding upon horses.
Ezek. 23:7 Thus she committed her whoredoms with them,
        with all them that were the chosen men of Assyria, and with all on whom she doted:
        with all their idols she defiled herself.

Ezek. 23:8 Neither left she her whoredoms brought from Egypt:
        for in her youth they lay with her, and they bruised the breasts of her virginity,
        and poured their whoredom upon her.
Ezek. 23:9 Wherefore I have delivered her into the hand of her lovers,
        into the hand of the Assyrians, upon whom she doted.
Ezek. 23:10 These discovered her nakedness: they took her sons and her daughters,
        and slew her with the sword: and she became famous among women;
        for they had executed judgment upon her.
Ezek. 23:11 And when her sister Aholibah [Judah] saw this,
        she was more corrupt in her inordinate love than she,
        and in her whoredoms more than her sister in her whoredoms.

Ezek 23:12 She doted upon the Assyrians her neighbours, captains 
        and rulers clothed most gorgeously, horsemen riding upon horses, all of them desirable young men.
Ezek 23:13 Then I saw that she was defiled, that they took both one way,
Ezek 23:14 And that she increased her whoredoms:
        for when she saw men pourtrayed upon the wall,
        the images of the Chaldeans portrayed with vermilion
Ezek 23:15 Girded with girdles upon their loins, exceeding in dyed attire upon their heads,
        all of them princes to look to, after the manner of the Babylonians of Chaldea,
        the land of their nativity: 
Ezek 23:16And as soon as she saw them with her eyes,
        she doted upon them, and sent messengers unto them into Chaldea.  
Ezek 23:17 And the Babylonians came to her into the bed of love,
        and they defiled her with their whoredom, and she was polluted with them,
        and her mind was alienated from them.  

Ezek 23:18 So she discovered her whoredoms, and discovered her nakedness: 
        then my mind was alienated from her, like as my mind was alienated from her sister.  

See Ezekiel 8 which defines the Lamenting for Tammuz which was an ancient Babylonian practice which points to the gates of hell.

The clergy at the time of Jesus were false Jews because the godly class had been dispersed to prevent the young men from being made into prostitutes to serve in the Abomination of Desolation in the Temple.  The driving purpose for the temple was to use the CRAFTSMEN to turn the temple into what is called "a den of thieves and a house of merchandise.

Matt. 23:29 Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites!
        because ye build the tombs of the prophets,
        and garnish the sepulchres of the righteous,
Matt. 23:27 Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites!
        for ye are like unto whited sepulchres, which indeed appear beautiful outward,
        but are within full of dead men’s bones, and of all uncleanness.
Matt. 23:28 Even so ye also outwardly appear righteous unto men,
        but within ye are full of hypocrisy and iniquity.

Ezek. 33:31 And they come unto thee as the people cometh, and they sit before thee as my people, and they hear thy words, but they will not do them: for with their mouth they shew much love, but their heart goeth after their covetousness.
Ezek. 33:32 And, lo, thou art unto them as a very lovely song of one that hath a pleasant voice,
        and can play well on an instrument: for they hear thy words,
        but they do them not.

5690.  egeb, eh´-gheb; from 5689; love (concretely), i.e. amative words:—much love, very lovely. 

The example Jesus would leave would be a WRITTEN record by those who had received the face-to-face teaching from Jesus and had it confirmed by miracles. They, too, would go out and display this power to the four classes beginning at Jerusalem.

JERUSALEM WAS A JEBUSITE HIGH PLACE: NEVER THE PLACE WHERE PEOPLE ASSEMBLED IN SYNAGOGUE.

IT WAS THE FALSE JEWS AS THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS WHO MURDERED THE PROPHETS ALL OF WHOM CALLED THE CIVIL-CLERGY ROBBERS AND PARASITES.

Matt. 23:34  Wherefore, behold,   

I send unto you prophets, and wise men, and scribes:
and some of them ye shall kill and crucify

and some of them shall ye scourge in your synagogues, and persecute them from city to city:
1121. gramma, gram´-mah; from 1125; a writing, i.e. a letter, note, epistle, book, etc.; plural learning:  bill, learning, letter, scripture, writing, written.
Matt. 23:35 That upon you may come all the righteous blood shed upon the earth,
        from the blood of righteous Abel unto the blood of Zacharias son of Barachias,
        whom ye slew between the temple and the altar.

Therefore, the confict will be between those who say they are Jews but are of the synagogue of Satan: This includes false Jews (non-Semites) and the church which has rapidly moved toward adopting the curse of the Law of Moses, its "king set over us," preachers and priests and the Levite exorcists as the patternism for a new style of worship.  This is defined as one of the PLAGUES.

THE END TIME MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT, THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS OF THE EARTH. 

Rev. 17:1 And there came one of the seven angels which had the seven vials, and talked with me, saying unto me, Come hither; I will shew unto thee the judgment of the great whore that sitteth upon many waters:
Rev. 17:2 With whom the kings of the earth have committed fornication, and the inhabitants of the earth have been made drunk with the wine of her fornication.
Rev. 17:3 So he carried me away in the spirit into the wilderness: and I saw a woman sit upon a scarletcoloured beast, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns.

THE BEASTS including A NEW STYLE OF MUSICAL WORSHIP.

2342.  therion, thay-ree´-on; diminutive from the same as 2339; a dangerous animal: — (venomous, wild) beast.

Thęriakos, III. as a term of reproach, beast, creature, the constellation  Lupus, Venenifier containing poison, Scorpio, a constellation, Pharmakis  A.sorceress, witch,

Theôr-is   II. pl.,= BakchaiPlb.30.25.12; of attendants of Apollo, 2. (sc. hodos) road by which the theôroi went, Hsch. of Charon's bark, A.Th.858 (lyr.).

Bakche A Bakche of Haidou frantic
handmaid of Hades, A.Eu.25.
 
A.Eu.25.  The Priestess of Pythian Apollo  

[Thęrion] III. as a term of reproach, beast, creature, mousikę aeiti kainon thęrion tiktei  kainon A new style of music, (Aphrodisias); but k. kômôidia, tragôidia, of a new style of drama, Mallon or overwrought, surprising,

Musikos II. of persons, skilled in music, musical, ; kuknos kai alla zôia epic, but opp. melopoios, professional musicians; mousikos kai melôn [melody] poętęs Meter, Metron [melody] III. of things, elegant, delicate

When the Spirit spoke to Jesus it was WITHOUT METER.

Tikto bring into the world, a Mother
A. Plb.30.25.1 Polybius, 31. The inhabitants of Peraea were like slaves unexpectedly [p. 424] released from chains, who are scarcely able to believe their present good fortune, thinking it a change almost too great to be natural; and cannot believe that those they meet can understand or fully see that they are really released, unless they do something strange and out of the ordinary course. . .

B.  Theoros spectators on the road to Delphoi

C. Aeschylus, 7 against Thebes. But sail upon the wind of lamentation, my friends, [855] and about your head row with your hands' rapid stroke in conveyance of the dead, Note 1. that stroke which always causes the sacred slack-sailed, black-clothed ship to pass over Acheron to the unseen land where Apollo does not walk, [860] the sunless land that receives all men.
Is. 28:15 Because ye have said, We have made a covenant with death, and with hell are we at agreement; when the overflowing scourge shall pass through, it shall not come unto us: for we have made lies our refuge, and under falsehood have we hid ourselves:
Is. 28:18 And your covenant with death shall be disannulled, and your agreement with hell shall not stand; when the overflowing scourge shall pass through, then ye shall be trodden down by it.
But here come Antigone and Ismene to do their bitter duty, the dirge over their brothers both. With all sincerity, I think, will they [865] pour forth their fitting grief from their lovely, deep-bosomed breasts. But it is right for us, before their singing, to cry out the awful hymn of the Erinys and thereafter [870] sing the hated victory song of Hades.
Note 1: As the souls of the brothers are now being conveyed across Acheron in Charon's boat, the Chorus in imagination aid their passage by the ritual of mourning. Their song of lamentation stands for the wind, the beating of their heads by their hands are the strokes of the oars. Contrasted with the grim vessel that transports all spirits to the sunless land of Hades, is the ship that goes to the festival at Delos, the “clearly-seen” island, the land of Apollo, god of light and health.

Rev. 17:4 And the woman was arrayed in purple and scarlet colour,
        and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls,
        having a golden cup
in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication:
Rev. 17:5 And upon her forehead was a name written,
        MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT,
        THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS OF THE EARTH.

Rev. 17:6 And I saw the woman drunken with the blood of the saints,
        and with the blood of the martyrs of Jesus:
        and
when I saw her, I wondered with great admiration.

Rev. 17:7 And the angel said unto me, Wherefore didst thou marvel?
        I will tell thee the mystery of the woman, and of the beast that carrieth her,
        which hath the seven heads and ten horns.
Rev. 17:8 The beast that thou sawest was, and is not; and shall ascend out of the bottomless pit, and go into perdition: and they that dwell on the earth shall wonder, whose names were not written in the book of life from the foundation of the world, when they behold the beast that was, and is not, and yet is.

Pysical Jerusalem has always been Egypt, Hagar, Sinai and bondage.

Rev. 11:8 And their dead bodies shall lie in the street of the great city
        which spiritually is called Sodom and Egypt, where also our Lord was crucified.

Rev. 11:9 And they of the people and kindreds and tongues and nations 
        shall see their dead bodies three days and an half,
        and shall not suffer their dead bodies to be put in graves.
Rev. 11:10 And they that dwell upon the earth shall rejoice over them,
        and make merry, and shall send gifts one to another;
        because these two prophets tormented them that dwelt on the earth

Rev. 17:17 For God hath put in their hearts to fulfil his will, and to agree, and give their kingdom 
        unto the beast, until the words of God shall be fulfilled.
Rev. 17:18 And the woman which thou sawest is that great city, 
        which reigneth over the kings of the earth. 

Rev. 21:10 And he carried me away in the spirit to a great and high mountain, 
        and shewed me that great city, the holy Jerusalem, 
        descending out of heaven from God,

REVELATION 18 THE MUSICAL MARK OF THE BEAST

Rev. 18:21 And a mighty angel took up a stone like a great millstone, and cast it into the sea, saying,
        Thus with violence shall that great city Babylon be thrown down,
        and shall be found no more at all.
Rev. 18:22 And the voice of harpers, and musicians, and of pipers, and trumpeters,
        shall be heard no more at all in thee; and no craftsman,
        of whatsoever craft he be, shall be found any more in thee;
        and the sound of a millstone shall be heard no more at all in thee;
Rev. 18:23 And the light of a candle shall shine no more at all in thee;
        and the voice of the bridegroom and of the bride shall be heard no more at all in thee:
        for thy merchants were the great men of the earth;
        for by thy sorceries were all nations deceived.
A sorcerer is: A. poisoner, sorcerer, magician, LXXEx.7.11 (masc.), Ma.3.5 (fem.), Apoc.21.8, 22.15.

pharmak-eus , eôs, ho,
A.
poisoner, sorcerer, S.Tr.1140, Pl.Smp.203d, etc.; gnęsioi sophistai kai ph. Jul.Or.6.197d .

Plato, Symposium [203d] rather is he hard and parched, shoeless and homeless; on the bare ground always he lies with no bedding, and takes his rest on doorsteps and waysides in the open air; true to his mother's nature, he ever dwells with want. But he takes after his father in scheming for all that is beautiful and good; for he is brave, strenuous and high-strung, a famous hunter, always weaving some stratagem; desirous and competent of wisdom, throughout life ensuing the truth; a master of jugglery, witchcraft,

Commentary

Gnęsi-os mętęr tôn erôtikôn logôn, of Aphrodite, Luc.Am.19; g. aretai real, unfeigned virtues, Pi.O.2.11; g. humnoi inspired song, B.8.83; e. melos a love song mętęr tôn erôtikôn logôn Mother of erôt-ikos A. of or caused by love, orgę, or Aphrodite:

Aphroditę [i_], hę, ( [aphros] ) Aphrodite, h.Hom.5, Hes.Th.195; dia tęn tou aphrou genesin Aphroditę eklęthę Pl.Cra.4c6 c.II. as Appellat., sexual love, pleasure, Od.22.444; hup' Apollôni psauein Aphroditas

Apollôn  Abaddon, Apollyon and his prostitute Muses Pure Apollo, too, who, though a god, was exiled once from heaven.
Rev. 18:24 And in her was found the blood of prophets, and of saints, and of all that were slain upon the earth.
THIS STUDY WILL PRIMARILY FOCUS ON THE CRAFTSMEN OR TECHNE AS A PROFESSIONAL CLERGY USING THE PATTERNISM OF THE CURSE IMPOSED UPON THE JEWS.

The TECHNE or craftsman includes any PROFESSIONAL arts and crafts in the Church of Christ: even the sound of the millstone is the MARK of the "grinders" who were prostitutes who plied their trade while supplying the "food" for the people. You need to back up and see that we are speaking of the Babylonian mother of harlots: ZOE is one of the names for the Mother of the gods who SEEKS worship for herself (whatever the sex). The Muses (musicians) in Revelation 18 are "dirty adulteresses" even if they only pollute the Word: John calls them sorcerers. This is the religious institution and Nashville is a city set on seven hills.

TECHNE or CRAFTSMEN doing hard work to sell the free water of the Word

Revelation 18 identifies the ministers of the mother of harlots as rhetoricians, singers, instrument players and craftsmen: this word applies almost totally to people employed in pagan religion and increasingly in the Church of Christ.  One role was as "theater builder and stage manager" warning against those who take the liberty to infiltrate and divert peaceable churches purposing to turn them into theaters for holy entertainment.  This is the new wineskins or holy bartender religion to ALERT those of faith.

People use ARTS AND CRAFTS to conduct religious rituals knowing that they are devices for deceiving and overpowering people for their own PROFIT and JOY.  John would be speaking of the Mother of Harlots as the BEGINNING TIME enemy of the Word or as the false and majority church.  The use of TURNING ANY TRICKS as a way to SUPLIMENT the work of Jesus Christ is TECHNE or CRAFTSMANSHIP including little silver idols or skilled singers and musicians because "men set their lies to melody better to deceive."  These people are BURNABLE so Paul is not speaking of secular skills.

For we hear that there are some which walk among you disorderly, working not at all, but are busybodies. 2 Thess 3: 11

John Calvin on verse 11. We hear that there are some among you. It is probable that this kind of drones were, as it were, the seed of idle monkhood. For, from the very beginning, there were some who,

under pretext of religion, either made free with the tables of others, or craftily drew to themselves the substance of the simple.

They had also, even in the time of Augustine, come to prevail so much, that he was constrained to write a book expressly against idle monks, where he complains with good reason of theirpride, because, despising the admonition of the Apostle, they not only excuse themselves on the ground of infirmity, but they wish to appear holier than all others, on the ground that they are exempt

He inveighs, with good reason, against this unseemliness, that, while the senators are laborious, the workman, or person in humble life, does not merely live in idleness,

2 but would fain have his indolence pass for sanctity. Such are his views.
3 In the mean time, however, the
evil has increased to such an extent, that idle bellies occupy nearly the tenth part of the world, whose only religion is to be well stuffed, and to have exemption from all annoyance

4 of labor. And this manner of life they dignify, sometimes with the name of the Order, sometimes with that of the Rule, of this or that personage.

And the voice of harpers, and musicians, and of pipers, and trumpeters, shall be heard no more at all in thee; and no craftsman, of whatsoever craft he be, shall be found any more in thee; and the sound of a millstone shall be heard no more at all in thee; Re.18:22

Technites (g5079) tekh-nee'-tace; from 5078; an artisan; fig. a founder (Creator): - builder, craftsman.
Techne
(g5078) tekh'-nay; from the base of 5088; art (as productive), i.e. (spec.) a trade, or (gen.) skill: - art, craft, occupation.

Tikto (g5088)tik'to; a strengthened form of a prim. teĺkoŃ +tx tek'- o (which is used only as alt. in certain tenses); to produce (from seed, as a mother, a plant, the earth, etc.), lit. or fig.: - bear, be born, bring forth, be delivered, be in travail

Techn-ę , hę, ( [tektôn] ) art, skill, cunning of hand,  of a soothsayer, A.Ag.249 (pl., lyr.), Eu.17, S.OT389, etc.; technai heterôn heterai Pi.N.1.25; ôpase t. Pasan Id.O.7.50 . 

Aeschylus, Eumenides 1 The Priestess of Pythian Apollo

First, in this prayer of mine, I give the place of highest honor among the gods to the first prophet, Earth; and after her to Themis, for she was the second to take this oracular seat of her mother, as legend tells. And in the third allotment, with Themis' consent and not by force, [5] another Titan, child of Earth, Phoebe, took her seat here. She gave it as a birthday gift to Phoebus, who has his name from Phoebe. Leaving the lake and ridge of Delos, he landed on Pallas' ship-frequented shores, [10] and came to this region and the dwelling places on Parnassus. The children of Hephaistos, road-builders taming the wildness of the untamed land, escorted him with mighty reverence. And at his arrival, the people [15] and Delphus, helmsman and lord of this land, made a great celebration for him. Zeus inspired his heart with prophetic skill and established him as the fourth prophet on this throne; but Loxias is the spokesman of Zeus, his father.

These are the gods I place in the beginning of my prayer. [20] And Pallas who stands before the temple is honored in my words; and I worship the Nymphs where the Corycianr ock is hollow, the delight of birds and haunt of gods. Bromius has held the region --I do not forget him-- ever since he, as a god, led the Bacchantes in war, [25] and contrived for Pentheus death as of a hunted hare. I call on the streams of Pleistus and the strength of Poseidon, and highest Zeus, the Fulfiller; and then I take my seat as prophetess upon my throne. And may they allow me now to have the best fortune, far better than on my previous entrances. [30] And if there are any from among the Hellenes here, let them enter, in turn, by lot, as is the custom. For I prophesy as the god leads. She enters the temple and after a brief interval returns terror-stricken

Pasan Id.O.7.50 . Pindar, Olympian 7. [10] for those men who were victors [nike] at Olympia and at Pytho. That man is prosperous, who is encompassed by good reports. Grace, which causes life to flourish, looks with favor now on one man, now on another, 
        with both the sweet-singing lyre and the full-voiced notes of flutes. 
[13] And now, with the music of flute and lyre alike I have come to land with Diagoras, singing the sea-child of Aphrodite and bride of Helios, Rhodes Truly, a cloud of forgetfulness sometimes descends unexpectedly, and draws the straight path of action away from the mind. For they climbed the hill without bringing the seed of burning flame; and they established the sacred precinct on the acropolis with fireless sacrifices. Zeus brought to them a yellow cloud [50] and rained on them abundant gold. And the gray-eyed goddess herself bestowed on them [51] every art, so that they surpassed all mortal men as the best workers with their hands;

2. craft, cunning., arts, wiles, he has a bad trick, Hes.Th.770, cf. Pi.I.4(3).35(53), S Ph.88, etc.

When Paul outlawed SELF pleasure and demanded serving the week the word is Ariskos excludes all performing arts or anything of private opinion: 

Outlawed: Areskô IV. areskei is used impers. to express the opinion or resolution of a public body, tauta ęrese sphi poieein Hdt.8.19 ; ęn d' areskęi taut' Athęnaiois Ar.Eq.1311 ; areskei . . einai Delphôn it is resolved that . . , SIG827D10; also of prevailing opinions; ta areskonta the dogmas of philosophers

No Scripture is of private interpretation meaning "further expounding."

Outlawed: Latin: Placeo I. part. fut. pass.: dos placenda, Plaut. Trin. 5, 2, 35 ; v. I. A. fin.) [cf. placo], to please, to be pleasing or agreeable, to be welcome, acceptable, to satisfy (class.).

B. In partic. 1. In scenic lang., of players or pieces presented, to please, find favor, give satisfaction: scenico placenti, fabulas

Outlawed: Scaenĭcus  I.of or belonging to the stage, scenic, dramatic, theatrical, I.Lit.: poëtae, dramatic poets, Varr. L. L. 9, § 17 Müll.: artifices, players, actors, 

Outlawed:  Orgănum, i, n., = organon, Of musical instruments, a pipeVulg. Gen. 4, 21 Water Organ:

Hydraula  ae, or hydraules , ae, m., = hudraulęs, one who plays on the waterorgan,  

hudr-aulis , eôs, hę, hydraulic organ, invented by Ctesibius,
Regularly used with:
Pharisaios 1 a Pharisee, Separatist (from pharash, to distinguish), one of a sect who separated themselves from other Jews as affecting superior holiness.

3. way, manner, or means whereby a thing is gained, without any definite sense of art or craft, mędemięi t. in no wise,   apostęsomai . . oute t. oute męchanęi oudemiai IG12.39.22 ; pasęi t. kai męchanęi X.An.4.5.16 ; męte t. męte męchanęi mędemiai Lys.13.95 .

Męchan-ę  engine of war, 3. theatrical machine by which gods, etc., were made to appear in the air, 

Organum , Of musical instruments, a pipe, used With: machina , ae, f. = mechane, I. a machine, i. e. any artificial contrivance for performing work, II.Trop., a device, plan, contrivance; esp. a trick, artifice, stratagem

Cratylus: Soc. And mine, too, Hermogenes. But do not be too much of a precisian, or "you will unnerve me of my strength." When you have allowed me to add mechane (contrivance) to techne (art) I shall be at the top of my bent, for I conceive mechane to be a sign of great accomplishment- anein; for mekos the meaning of greatness, and these two, mekos and anein, make up the word mechane.

Wherefore if Demetrius, and the craftsmen which are with him, have a matter against any man, the law is open, and there are deputies: let them implead one another. Ac.19:38

And the voice of harpers, and musicians, and of pipers, and trumpeters, shall be heard no more at all in thee; and no craftsman, of whatsoever craft he be, shall be found any more in thee; and the sound of a millstone shall be heard no more at all in thee; Re.18:22

Technites (h5079) tekh-nee'-tace; from 5078; an artisan; fig. a founder (Creator): - builder, craftsman 

Lysias 13. [95] In the name of the Olympian gods, gentlemen of the jury, let neither art nor craft induce you to condemn those men to death who precisely for their many good services to you were put to death by the Thirty and by Agoratus here. Remember all the horrors, both those that smote the State as a whole and those that each of us felt in private, when those men lost their lives, and punish the author of them all. It has been made plain to you, alike from the decrees, the depositions and all the rest, that Agoratus is the author of their death. 

II. an art, craft, pasai technai brotoisin  to know the craft, technęn echei he makes this his trade, to learn a thing professionally,  having made a trade live by them, X.Lac. 7.1.

III. an art or craft, i.e. a set of rules, system or method of making or doing, whether of the useful arts, or of the fine arts, technęn epoięsen, the Art of Rhetoricsystems of rhetoric,but rather tricks of Rhetoric, in Aeschin. 1.117); technęi by rules of art,  

Aeschin. 1.117 Aeschines, Timarchus 1.[117]

The first of these points is an anticipation of the defence which I hear he is about to offer, for I fear that if I neglect this topic, that man who professes to teach the young the tricks of speech1 may mislead you by some artifice, and so defraud the state. My second point is an exhortation of the citizens to virtue. And I see many young men present in court, and many of their elders, and not a few citizens of other states of Hellas, gathered here to listen.  


1 The reference is to Demosthenes, who, we must from this statement conclude, was in his earlier years a professional teacher of rhetoric, as well as a lawyer and politician.

Poieô 4. after Hom., of Poets, compose, write, p. dithurambon, Saturous. kômôidian, tragôidian, write poetry, write as a poet,  

Rhętor-ikos , oratorical, hę rhętorikę (sc. technę) rhetoric; of persons, skilled in SPEAKING, fit to be an ORATOR

Hupokritikos , ę, on, belonging to hupokrisis 11, skilled therein, esti phuseôs to hu. einai having a good delivery, Arist.Rh.1404a15 .
2. suited for speaking or delivery, (sc.
technę) the art of delivery, (but, the actor's art, .
3. metaph.,
acting a part, pretending to

Hupokrinomai II. of actors, to answer on the stage: hence to play a part, be an actor
2. to represent
dramatically: hence to exaggerate
3. metaph. to
play a part, to feign, pretend,  

THE PERFORMER OR CRAFTSMAN.

Techn-ikos , ę, on, of persons, artistic, skilful, workmanlike,  esp. of rhetoricians and grammarians, more proficient in one's craft,  energeiai, hoion aulein ę salpizein ę kitharizein 

Grammat-ikos A.knowing one's letters, a good scholar 3. concerned with textual criticism, exęgęsis D.H.Th.51; grammatika  Mousikos II. of persons, skilled in music, musical2.votary of the Muses, man of letters and accomplishments, scholar, more accomplished in speaking before a mob, III. of things, elegant, delicate, generally,

Matt. 5:20 For I say unto you, That except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven.

Matt. 20:18 Behold, we go up to Jerusalem; and the Son of man shall be betrayed unto the chief priests and unto the scribes, and they shall condemn him to death,

Matt. 23:29 Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! because ye build the tombs of the prophets, and garnish the sepulchres of the righteous,
Matt. 23:34  Wherefore, behold, I send unto you prophets, and wise men, and scribes: and some of them ye shall kill and crucify; and some of them shall ye scourge in your synagogues, and persecute them from city to city:
Matt. 23:35 That upon you may come all the righteous blood shed upon the earth, from the blood of righteous Abel unto the blood of Zacharias son of Barachias, whom ye slew between the temple and the altar.

Matt 15:7 Ye hypocrites, well did Esaias prophesy of you, saying,

Hypokrites (g5273) hoop-ok-ree-tace'; from 5271; an actor under an assumed character (stage-player), i.e. (fig.) a dissembler ("hypocrite"): - hypocrite.

hupokrinô reply, make answer, of an oracle, 2. expound, interpret, explain [Peter outlawed this as private interpretation.] 2. deliver a speech, declaim, of orators and rhetoricians, represent dramatically, erôtikôn dramatôn 3. of an orator, use histrionic arts, exaggerate, ape, mimic, Mania or religious frenzy.

Rhętor-ikos , ę, on, oratorical, hę rhętorikę (sc. technę). These are the craftsmen lumped with the singers, musicians and "grinder" doing merchandise in the house of prayer. Rev. 18:22

SIMILAR LATIN: canto I. Neutr., to produce melodious sounds (by the voice or an instrument), to sound, sing, play (class. in prose and poetry; to sing and play while the actor accompanies the song with gestures or dancing, C. Transf., of instruments, to sound, resound: 2. Of the singing pronunciation of an orator, to declaim in a singing tone, to sing 

energeiai, hoion aulein ę salpizein ę kitharizein

Energeia 1 [from energęs] action, operation, energy, Arist.

Energ-ęs , męchanas energeis poiountes 
                   Organon , to, ( [ergon, erdô] ) I. an implement, instrument, engine of any kind
                     Ergon  [Ergô] I.work, 1. in Il. mostly of deeds of war, 
                               polemęď aerga, 3.a hard piece of work, a hard task, Il.: also, a shocking deed or act,
3. musical instrument, organôn ekęlei anthrôpous, of Marsyas,  poluchordaId.of the pipe, 

Auleô ,  [aulos] ):--play on the flute, Phrugion aulęsen melosau. exodon play a finale, Ar.V.582; au. eiresian, of the boatswain, of tunes, to be played on the flute, ho Bakcheios rhuthmos ęuleito auleitai pan melathronis filled with music, E.IT367 .

2. of persons, play to, Philostr.VA2.34, cf. A.D.Synt.302.1:--mostly in Pass., to be played to, hear music, X.An.6.1.11, Cyr.4.5.7, Arist. Pr.917b19 (but possibly Med. as in Pl.Lg.791a), Thphr.Char.19.10, 20.10.

II. generally, play, kerati Luc.DDeor.12.1 , cf. Poll.4.74.

Salp-izô-sound the trumpet, salpinxi rhuthmous polemou, sęmeion poięis when the trumpet sounded, 
Matt. 6:2 Therefore when thou doest thine alms, do not sound a trumpet before thee, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may have glory of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward.
1Cor. 15:52 In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpetand we shall be changed. shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible,
2. c. acc., hęmeran s. proclaim, announce day, of the cock, Luc.Ocyp.114. 
Kithar-izô :--play the cithara, phormingi . . himeroen kitharize luręi d' eraton kitharizôn  
 
Parasi-tor , to play the parasite, to sponge: parasitarier parasitando pascere ventres suos, id. Pers. 1, 2, 3 .  
Ventertris, . In addition to foods:
b. phusis = pur technikon. noun the mind of the Great Designer, 

2. artful, cunning, Plb.16.6.6.

II. of things, artificial,  

2. done by rules of art, technical, systematic, touto sophon polemon agônia 

Technit-ęs 
    II.one who does or handles a thing by the rules of art, skilled workman, o
III. trickster, intriguer
Xenophon, Cryuopaedia 8.[11] Then, when the palace gates were thrown open, there were led out at the head of the procession four abreast some exceptionally handsome bulls for Zeus and for the other gods as the magi directed; for the Persians think that they ought much more scrupulously to be guided by those whose profession is with things divine than they are by those in other professions. [12] Next after the bulls came horses, a sacrifice for the Sun; and after them came a chariot sacred to Zeus; it was drawn by white horses and with a yoke of gold and wreathed with garlands; and next, for the Sun, a chariot drawn by white horses and wreathed with garlands like the other. After that came a third chariot with horses covered with purple trappings, and behind it followed men carrying fire on a great altar.

Demosthenes 19.[192] To show you, then, that these men are the basest and most depraved of all Philip's visitors, private as well as official,--yes, of all of them,--let me tell you a trifling story that has nothing to do with the embassy. After Philip had taken Olynthus, he was holding Olympian games,1 and had invited all sorts of artists to the religious celebration and the festival.
Techni_t-is (properisp.), idos, fem. of technitęs, of an accomplished courtesan 
SophiaA.cleverness or skill in handicraft and art,  in music and singing, technęikaih.Merc.483, cf. 511; in poetry, 4. among the Jews, archęs ophias phobos Kuriou LXX Pr.1.7 , cf. Jb.28.28, al.; Sophia, recognized first as an attribute of God, was later identified with the Spirit of God, cf. LXX Pr.8 with Si.24sq. s.

Hupobol-eus , eôs, ho, ( [hupoballô] ) SUGGESTER, reminder (v. hupobolę 1.3 ), Ph.1.591; in a THEATER, prompter

2. INTERPRETER, Eust.106.12.
II. =
hupagôgeus 11, Theo Sm.p.71 H. 

Huperlian , Adv. beyond measure, exceedingly, sophos Eust.1396.42; to hu. Id.1184.18 ; hoi hu. apostoloi the 'super-Apostles', 2 Ep.Cor. 11.5, 12.11.

Sophos I. properly, skilled in any handicraft or art, cunning in his craft, Theogn., etc; of a charioteer, Pind.; of poets and musicians; of a soothsayer

2. clever in matters of common life, wise, prudent, shrewd, s. andres Thessaloi shrewd fellows, the Thessalians! Hdt.; polla sophos Aesch.; meizô sophian sophos Plat., etc.; tôn sophôn kreissô better than all craft, Soph.; sophon [esti] c. inf., Eur.

Sohis-teia, sophistry, mantikę, of Balaam, mantikę means divination, soothsayer

The ophis is the SERPENT or Devil. In the garden of Eden the serpent was a MUSICAL ENCHANTER.

OPHIS-teia, sophistry, mantikę, of Balaam, mantikę means divination, soothsayer

Playto, Cratylus says "the part of appropriative, coercive, hunting art which hunts animals, land animals, tame animals, man, privately, for pay, is paid in cash, claims to give education, and is a hunt after rich and promising youths, must--so our present argument concludes--be called sophistry.

Sophia Ion. -ię, hę, prop. cleverness or skill in handicraft and art, as in carpentry, tektonos, hos rha te pasęs eu eidęi s. Il.15.412; of the Telchines, Pi.O.7.53; hę entechnos s., of Hephaestus and Athena, Pl.Prt.32 1d; of Daedalus and Palamedes, X.Mem.4.2.33, cf. 1.4.2; in music and singing, technęi kai s. h.Merc.483, cf. 511; in poetry, Sol.13.52, Pi.O.1.117, Ar.Ra.882, X.An.1.2.8, etc.; in driving, Pl. Thg.123c; in medicine or surgery, Pi.P.3.54; in divination, S.OT 502 (lyr.); dusthanatôn hupo sophias eis gęras aphiketo Pl.R.406b ; s. dęmęgorikę, dikanikę, ib.365d; hę peri Homęrou s. Id.Ion 542a; ou sophiai alla phusei poiein Id.Ap.22b ; sęmainontes tęn s . . ., hoti aretę technęs estin Arist.EN1141a12 : rare in pl., Pi.O.9.107, Ar.Ra.676 (lyr.), IG12.522 (vase, v B
of the Telchines, Pi.O.7.53
Pindar Olympian 7 [39] Then even the god that brings light to mortals, son of Hyperion,[40] enjoined his dear children to observe the obligation that was soon to be due: that they should be the first to build for the goddess an altar visible to all men, and by founding a sacred burnt-offering warm the spirit of the father and of the daughter who thunders with her spear. She who casts excellence and joys into men is the daughter of Forethought, Reverence. [45] Truly, a cloud of forgetfulness sometimes descends unexpectedly, and draws the straight path of action away from the mind. For they climbed the hill without bringing the seed of burning flame; and they established the sacred precinct on the acropolis with fireless sacrifices. Zeus brought to them a yellow cloud [50] and rained on them abundant gold. And the gray-eyed goddess herself bestowed on them [51] every art, so that they surpassed all mortal men as the best workers with their hands; and the roads bore works of art like living, moving creatures, and their fame was profound. For a wise craftsman, even superior skill is free from guile

In music and singing, technęi kai s. h.Merc.483, Homer to Hermes 4: What skill is this? What song for desperate cares? What way of song? For verily here are three things to hand all at once from which to choose, --mirth, and love, and sweet sleep. [450] And though I am a follower of the Olympian Muses who love dances and the bright path of song --the full-toned chant and ravishing thrill of flutes --yet I never cared for any of those feats of skill at young men's revels, as I do now for this: [455] I am filled with wonder, O son of Zeus, at your sweet playing.
        O Far-worker, and oracles from Zeus, even all his ordinances.
Of all these I myself have already learned that you have great wealth. Now, you are free to learn whatever you please;
        [475]
 but since, as it seems, your heart is so strongly set on playing the lyre, chant, and play upon it, and give yourself to merriment, taking this as a gift from me, and do you, my friend, bestow glory on me. Sing well with this clear-voiced companion in your hands; for you are skilled in good, well-ordered utterance. [480] From now on bring it confidently to the rich feastlovely dance and glorious revel, a joy by night and by day. Whoso with wit and wisdom enquires of it cunningly, him it teaches [485] through its sound all manner of things that delighteasily played with gentle familiarities, for it abhors toilsome drudgery; but whoso in ignorance enquires of it violently, to him it chatters mere vanity and foolishness.

and the mind, being In music and singing, technęi kai .Merc. 511 But you are able to learn whatever you please. [490] So then, I will give you this lyre, glorious son of Zeus, while I for my part will graze down with wild-roving cattle the pastures on hill and horse-feeding plain: so shall the cows covered by the bulls calve abundantly both males and females. And now there is no need for you, [495] bargainer though you are, to be furiously angry.”

When Hermes had said this, he held out the lyre: and Phoebus Apollo took it, and readily put his shining whip in Hermes' hand, and ordained him keeper of herds. The son of Maia received it joyfully, [500] while the glorious son of Leto, the lord far-working Apollo, took the lyre upon his left arm and tried each string with the key. Awesomely it sounded at the touch of the god, while he sang sweetly to its note.

Afterwards they two, the all-glorious sons of Zeus turned the cows back towards the sacred meadow, [505] but themselves hastened back to snowy Olympus, delighting in the lyre. Then wise Zeus was glad and made them both friends. And Hermes loved the son of Leto continually, even as he does now, when he had given the lyre as token to the Far-shooter, [510] who played it skilfully, holding it upon his arm. But for himself Hermes found out another cunning art and made himself the pipes whose sound is heard afar.

dęmęgorikę
dęmęgor-ikos A.suited to public speaking,
Aristotle Rhetoric [3] Now, previous compilers of “Arts” of Rhetoric have provided us with only a small portion of this art, for proofs are the only things in it that come within the province of art; everything else is merely an accessory. And yet they say nothing about enthymemes which are the body of proof, but chiefly devote their attention to matters outside the subject; [4] for the arousing of prejudice, compassion, anger, and similar emotions has no connection with the matter in hand, but is directed only to the dicast. The result would be that, if all trials were now carried on as they are in some States,
        (20)
 especially those that are well administered,
        there would be nothing left for the rhetorician to say.

[5]
 For all men either think that all the laws ought so to prescribe, or in fact carry out the principle and forbid speaking outside the subject, as in the court of Areopagus, and in this they are right. For it is wrong to warp the dicast's feelings, to arouse him to anger, jealousy or compassion, which would be like making the rule crooked which one intended to use.
Techni_t-ęs  A. artificer, craftsman, opp. geôrgos, X.Oec.6.6, Arist.Pol.1262b26, al.; opp. rhętôr, Emp. ap. Thphr.Sens.11; of a potter, PCair.Zen.500.2,3 (iii B.C.); technitaihoichręsimontipoieinepistamenoi, opp. hoieleutheriôspepaideumenoi, X.Mem.2.7.4,5, cf. Act.Ap.19.24: metaph., polishęs t. kaidęmiourgoshotheosEp.Hebr.11.10 , cf. LXX Wi.13.1.
II.one who does or handles a thing by the rules of art, skilled workman,. persons versed in religious practices, Id.Cyr.8.3.11; anthrôpos t. logôn, as a sneer, Dionuson t., theatrical artists, musicians as well as actors, D. 19.192 (where t. alone), Arist.Rh.1405a24, Pr.956b11, SIG399.12 (Amphict. Delph., iii B.C.), CIG2619, al. (Cyprus), OGI50 (Egypt, iii B.C.), Plb.16.21.8, Posidon.36 J., etc.; so perh. in hoios t. parapollumai, = Lat.qualis artifex pereo (Nero's last words), D.C.63.29.
III. trickster, intriguer,
Xenophon, Cyropaedia 8:3. [11] Then, when the palace gates were thrown open, there were led out at the head of the procession four abreast some exceptionally handsome bulls for Zeus and for the other gods as the magi directed; for the Persians think that they ought much more scrupulously to be guided by those whose profession is with things divine than they are by those in other professions. [12] Next after the bulls came horses, a sacrifice for the Sun; and after them came a chariot sacred to Zeus; it was drawn by white horses and with a yoke of gold and wreathed with garlands; and next, for the Sun, a chariot drawn by white horses and wreathed with garlands like the other. After that came a third chariot with horses covered with purple trappings, and behind it followed men carrying fire on a great altar.
D. 19.192 Demosthenes. 19 [192] To show you, then, that these men are the basest and most depraved of all Philip's visitors, private as well as official,--yes, of all of them,--let me tell you a trifling story that has nothing to do with the embassy. After Philip had taken Olynthus, he was holding Olympian games, and had invited all sorts of artists to the religious celebration and the festival. ,

A. poisoner, sorcerer, S.Tr.1140, Pl.Smp.203d, etc.; gnęsioi sophistai kai ph. Jul.Or.6.197d .

Plato, Symposium [203d] rather is he hard and parched, shoeless and homeless; on the bare ground always he lies with no bedding, and takes his rest on doorsteps and waysides in the open air; true to his mother's nature, he ever dwells with want. But he takes after his father in scheming for all that is beautiful and good; for he is brave, strenuous and high-strung, a famous hunter, always weaving some stratagem; desirous and competent of wisdom, throughout life ensuing the truth; a master of jugglery, witchcraft,

Commentary

Plato.Symposium

gnęsi-os mętęr tôn erôtikôn logôn, of Aphrodite, Luc.Am.19; g. aretai real, unfeigned virtues, Pi.O.2.11; g. humnoi inspired song, B.8.83; e. melos a love song

mętęr tôn erôtikôn logôn Mother of erôt-ikos A. of or caused by love, orgę, or Aphrodite
ou rhaidiôs dietethę : was handled not softly, i.e. cruelly killed (ou
rhaidiôs, kakôs Hesych. and Phot.).

Humnos , ho, A.hymn, ode, in praise of gods or heros, u. Haidou, of one whose songs are death, E.Ba.72 

Bacchae 64 From the land of Asia, [65]  having left sacred Tmolus, I am swift to perform for Bromius my sweet labor and toil easily borne, celebrating the god Bacchus . Who is in the way? Who is in the way? Who? Let him get out of the way indoors, and let everyone keep his mouth pure  [70]  speaking propitious things. For I will celebrate Dionysus with hymns according to eternal custom. 

Daughters of Zeus ruling on high, famed for the lyre, ... Pierian Muses ... weave ... [5]  Isthmian land ... son-in-law of wise Nereus ... ... of the island ... [10]  god-built gates of Pelops' shining island

Ode 2 For Argeius of Ceos Boys' Boxing Match (?) at the Isthmus Date unknown

Fame, whose gifts are revered, speed to holy Ceos bringing the gracious message: [5]  that Argeius won the victory in the battle of bold hands, and brought to mind the fine deeds which we, from the holy island of Euxantius, have shown at the famous neck of the Isthmus, [10]  winning seventy garlands. the native Muse summons the sweet clang of flutes, honoring the dear son of Pantheides with victory songs.

Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War
 they rushed, as they were, within the gates, and meeting with Hipparchus by the Leocorium recklessly fell upon him at once, infuriated, Aristogiton by love, and Harmodius by insult, and smote him and slew him. [4] Aristogiton escaped the guards at the moment, through the crowd running up, but was afterwards taken and dispatched in no merciful way: Harmodius was killed on the spot.

Sophis-tęs   A. master of one's craft, adept, mageiron expert  of diviners tôn hierôn melôn  musicians, Pi.I.5(4).28 sophistęs  . parapaiôn chelun 2.sophist (in bad sense), quibbler, cheat, 3. later of the rhętores, even of Socrates (though he did not teach for money), Aeschin.1.173; so of Christ, Luc.Peregr.13: hence (from the ill repute of the professed sophists at Athens) Professors of Rhetoric

para-paiôA.strike on the side, strike falsely, chelun Hermes lyre made from a turtle shell.
  II. intr., strike a false note : metaph., to be infatuated, lose one's wits
2. fall away from,

paiô1 2. c. acc. instrumenti, to strike, dash one thing against another, karai theos mega baros epaisen the god dashed a great weight upon my head, i. e. smote me heavily, Soph.; epaisas epi nosôi noson   
Chelus 
 A. tortoise, h.Merc.33. 2. lyre (since Hermes made the first lyre by stretching strings on a tortoise's shell, which acted as a sounding-board),

Melos B. esp. musical member, phrase: hence, song, strain, 2.music to which a song is set, tune, 3.melodyphorminxd'auphthengoith'hieron m. ędekaiaulos

Herodotus, The Histories 2:
XLIX. Now then, it seems to me that Melampus son of Amytheon was not ignorant of but was familiar with this sacrifice. For Melampus was the one who taught the Greeks the name of Dionysus and the way of sacrificing to him and the phallic procession; he did not exactly unveil the subject taking all its details into consideration, for the teachers who came after him made a fuller revelation; but it was from him that the Greeks learned to bear the phallus along in honor of Dionysus, and they got their present practice from his teaching. [2] I say, then, that Melampus acquired the prophetic art, being a discerning man, and that, besides many other things which he learned from Egypt, he also taught the Greeks things concerning Dionysus, altering few of them; for I will not say that what is done in Egypt in connection with the god and what is done among the Greeks originated independently: for they would then be of an Hellenic character and not recently introduced. [3] Nor again will I say that the Egyptians took either this or any other custom from the Greeks. But I believe that Melampus learned the worship of Dionysus chiefly from Cadmus of Tyre and those who came with Cadmus from Phoenicia to the land now called Boeotia.
Pindar, 1.5 [1] Mother of the Sun, Theia of many names, for your sake men honor gold as more powerful than anything else; [5] and through the value you bestow on them, o queen, ships contending on the sea and yoked teams of horses in swift-whirling contests become marvels. [7] And in athletic contests, someone who has wreathed his hair with many garlands has achieved longed-for fame, when he has been victorious with his hands [10] or with the swiftness of his feet. But the valor of men is judged by gods, and there are only two things that cultivate the sweetest flower of life in blossoming prosperity: [13] to have good fortune and a noble reputation. Do not seek to become Zeus; you have everything, [15] if a share of these fine things comes to you. Mortal aims befit mortal men. But for you, Phylacidas, flourishing twofold excellence is recorded at the Isthmus, and at Nemea for both you and Pytheas in the pancratium. But my heart [20] cannot taste songs without telling of the race of Aeacus.I have come with the Graces for the sons of Lampon [22] to this well-governed city. If Aegina turns her steps to the clear road of god-given deeds, then do not grudge [25] to mix for her in song a boasttoils. In heroic times, too, fine warriors gained fame, and they are celebrated with lyres and flutes in full-voiced harmonies [28] for time beyond reckoning. Heroes who are honored by the grace of Zeus provide a theme for skilled poets: [30] among the Aetolians the brave sons of Oeneus are worshipped with shining sacrifices

that is fitting recompense for
Mageir-os , ho, Dor. magi_ros IG42(1).144 (Epid., v B.C.), SIG241.16 (Delph., iv B.C.), IG9(1).976.7 (Corc., iv/iii B. C.); but Att. mageiros ib.22.10B2 (v/iv B.C.), and so in Pap. of iii B.C., PCair.Zen.6.48, al., PRev.Laws50.14, both forms freq. in later Inscrr., Pap., and codd.; Aeol. dia tou i_

Heredotus 6.60 Moreover the Lacedaemonians are like the Egyptians, in that their heralds and flute-players (auletai) and cooks inherit the craft from their fathers, a flute-player's son (auletes) being a flute-player, and a cook's son a cook, and a herald's son a herald (auletes te auleteo ginetai kai mageiros mageirou kai keryx kerykos), no others usurp their places, making themselves heralds by loudness of voice; they ply their craft by right of birth. (Translation: Godley 1971)
Pseudo-Plutarch De musica (Mus.) 1145e-1146a "Notice," Homer is saying, "how music should be used, since it was suitable for Achilles, son of the most upright Peleus, to sing of the glories of men and the deeds of demigods." [f] Homer as also shown us the occasion which accords with its use, revealing it as a valuable and pleasant exercise for a man not actively occupied. Achilles was a man of war and action, but he was taking no part in the perils of war because of his anger with Agamemnon: hence Homer thought it suitable for the hero to sharpen his spirit with the noblest songs, so that he should be prepared to go out into battle, as he was soon to do; and this is plainly what he was doing as he recounted deeds of long ago. 
‘That is what the ancient music was like, [1146a] and what it was useful for. Thus we hear of Heracles, Achilles, and many others making use of music, and their teacher, according to tradition, was the wise Cheiron, who gave instruction not only in music but in justice and in medicine as well. (Translation: Barker 1984)

PCair.Zen.6.48  Papyri 1.59001. Date: 273BC Location: Phi.

45 1  [Dionusiôi 2 Dęmęt]rios 3 Damônos 4 Thręiki Thraix tôn 5 Lukophron[os] sunklę
Dionusios III.Dionusion, to, fruit of kissos,
Euripides, Bacchae Chorus

Blessed is he who, being fortunate and knowing the rites of the gods, keeps his life pure and [75]  has his soul initiated into the Bacchic revels, dancing in inspired frenzy over the mountains with holy purifications, and who, revering the mysteries of great mother Kybele, [80]  brandishing the thyrsos, garlanded with ivy, serves Dionysus.

Kubelę, , Cybele, E.Ba.79 (lyr.), Ar.Av.877, etc.:--from Kubelon , to, or Kubela , ta, mountain in Phrygia, D.S.3.58, Str.12.5.3:-- hence Adj. Kubelęgenęs , St.Byz.:--also Kubębę , Hippon.120 (dub.), Hdt.5.102, Anacreont.11.1; equated with Aphrodite by Charon Hist. (FHGiv p.627):--fem.Adj. Kubęlis , idos, , Cybelian, A. Kubęlidos organa Rheięs Nonn.D.10.387 , 14.214, cf. Hippon.121, prob.in St.Byz. s.v. Kubeleia:--also Kubelęďs , Nonn.D.14.10, al

The Phrase: A. Kubęlidos B. organa C. Rheięs

A. Kubęlidos The Great Mother, Aphrodite, 

B. organa  Organon , to, ( [ergon, erdô] )  Used with  doulos

3. musical instrument, Simon.31, f.l. in A.Fr.57.1 ; homendi' organôn ekęleianthrôpous, of Marsyas, Pl.Smp.215c ; aneuorganônpsiloislogoisPlt.268b ; o. poluchordaId.R.399c , al.; met'ôidęskaitinônorganônMus.p.98K. ; of the pipe, Melanipp.2, Telest.1.2 ibid., cf. Phld.

C. Rheięs Rhea daughter of Uranos and Gaia, wife of Cronos, mother of Zeus and the gods

Hesiod Theogony From the Heliconian Muses let us begin to sing, who hold the great and holy mount of Helicon, and dance on soft feet about the deep-blue spring and the altar of the almighty son of Cronos, [5] and, when they have washed their tender bodies in Permessus or in the Horse's Spring or Olmeius, make their fair, lovely dances upon highest Helicon and move with vigorous feet. Thence they arise and go abroad by night, [10] veiled in thick mist, and utter their song with lovely voice, praising Zeus the aegis-holder, and queenly Hera of

[20] Earth, too, and great Oceanus, and dark Night, and the holy race of all the other deathless ones that are for ever. And one day they taught Hesiod glorious song while he was shepherding his lambs under holy Helicon, and this word first the goddesses said to me-- [25] the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus who holds the aegis: “Shepherds of the wilderness, wretched things of shame, mere bellies, we know how to speak many false things as though they were true; but we know, when we will, to utter true things.” So said the ready-voiced daughters of great Zeus, and they plucked and gave [30] me a rod, a shoot of sturdy laurel, a marvellous thing, and breathed into me a divine voice to celebrate things that shall be and things that were aforetime; and they bade me sing of the race of the blessed gods that are eternally, but ever to sing of themselves both first and last. 

Go, Bacchae, go, Bacchae, escorting the god Bromius, child of a god, [85]  from the Phrygian mountains to the broad streets of Hellas--Bromius,

Bakchę A.Bacchante, A.Eu.25, S.Ant.1122,    Ar.Nu.605, Pl. Ion534a,

Bakchę Haidou frantic handmaid of Hades, E.Hec.1077; b.  nekuôn Id.Ph.1489 (lyr.).  

Mainas mainas , ados, , ( [mainomai]A.raving, frantic, lussaA.raving, frantic, lussa

Dionysus

You who are eager to see what you ought not and hasty in pursuit of what ought not to be pursued--I mean you, Pentheus, come forth before the house, be seen by me, [915]  wearing the clothing of a woman, of an inspired maenad, a spy upon your mother and her company.

Aristophanes, Clouds 595. Hear me again, King Phoebus, Delian Apollo, who inhabitest the high-peaked Cynthian rock! And thou, blessed goddess, who inhabitest the all-golden house of Ephesus, in which Lydian damsels greatly reverence thee; and thou, our national goddess, swayer of the aegis, Minerva, guardian of the city! And thou, reveler Bacchus, who, inhabiting the Parnassian rock, sparklest with torches, conspicuous among the Delphic Bacchanals!

Aeschylus, Eumenides 1 [25] and contrived for Pentheus death as of a hunted hare. I call on the streams of Pleistus and the strength of Poseidon, and highest Zeus, the Fulfiller; and then I take my seat as prophetess upon my throne. And may they allow me now to have the best fortune, far better than on my previous entrances. [30] And if there are any from among the Hellenes here, let them enter, in turn, by lot, as is the custom. For I prophesy as the god leads.

Sophocles, Antigone [1115] God of many names, glory of the Cadmeian bride and offspring of loud-thundering Zeus, you who watch over far-famed Italy and reign [1120] in the valleys of Eleusinian Deo where all find welcome! O Bacchus, denizen of Thebes, the mother-city of your Bacchants, dweller by the wet stream of Ismenus on the soil [1125] of the sowing of the savage dragon's teeth!

Haidęs I.Hades or Pluto (cf. Ploutôn), the god of the nether world, son of Kronus and Rhea, brother to Zeus,

Hades 

Plato Ion [534a] just as the Corybantian worshippers do not dance when in their senses, so the lyric poets do not indite those fine songs in their senses, but when they have started on the melody and rhythm they begin to be frantic, and it is under possession--as the bacchants are possessed, and not in their senses, when they draw honey and milk from the rivers--that the soul of the lyric poets does the same thing, by their own report. For the poets tell us, I believe, that the songs they bring us are the sweets they cull from honey-dropping founts


The Corybantes were priests of Cybele or Rhea, mother of Zeus and other Olympian gods, and she was worshipped with wild music and frenzied dancing which, like the bacchic revels or orgies of women in honor of Dionysus, carried away the participants despite and beyond themselves. Cf. Eurip. Bacchae.

2  Demetrios belonging to Demeter Homer to Demeter

The Corinthians clearly understood the connection between LIFELESS INSTRUMENTS and singing and speaking in tongues. A prostitute or courtesan is a:

Korinthios , a, on, Corinthian, Hdt., etc.; K. korę courtesan, Pl.R. 404d; hetairai K. Ar.Pl.149; oinos K. Alex.290; K. kadoi Diph.61.3 . Adv. -iôs in Corinthian fashion, oikos (house, Temple) K. estegasmenos J.AJ8.5.2 :-- fem. Korinthias , ados, hę, St.Byz.:--also Korinthiakos , ę, on, X.HG6.2.9; K. gluphai Ph.1.666 : Korinthikos , AP6.40 (Maced.). B. Korę.. the Daughter (of Demeter), name under which Persephone (Proserpine) was worshipped in Attica

Hetaira

1. a companion, Il.; phorminx, hęn daiti (feast) theoi (god) poięsan (make) hetairęn Od.; penia sphin hetaira Theocr.  2. opp. to a lawful wife, a concubine, a courtesan, Hdt., attic  hetair-os 2. Ar.Pl.149, opp. pornę (a common prostitute), Anaxil.22.1 ; opp. gametę, Philetaer.5 ; Aphroditęhe. Apollod.Hist.17.

Ar.Pl.149: Aristophanes, Plutus

Chremylus: And what of the Corinthian whores? [150] If a poor man offers them proposals, they do not listen; but if it be a rich one, instantly they turn their arses to him.

Cario: It's the same with the lads; they care not for love, to them money means everything.

Chremylus: [155] You speak of male whores; yet some of them are honest, and it's not money they ask of their patrons.

Aphrodite II. as Appellat., sexual love, pleasure,Od.22.444; hup'Apollôni psauein Aphroditas Pi.O.6.35 ; erga Aphroditęsh.Ven.1 ,9, etc.; matęn A., tęn A., a woman's form of oath, Ar.Lys.208, Ec.189, etc.III. hotas Aphroditas [astęr] the planet Venus,

Psauo 4.touch, affect, ou gar akras kardias epsause mou E.Hec.242. 5. reach, gain, humnôn   [festive ode]

humnos , ho, A.hymn, ode, in praise of gods or heroes. Aoide. a song, spell, incantationmelizô to modulate, sing, warble, Melos, melody

Pi.N.5.42 ; ps. Aphroditas Id.O. 6.35 :[sexual}  abs., hit the mark

Pi.O.6.35 Pindar, Nemean 5. The most beautiful chorus of Muses sang gladly for the Aeacids on Mt. Pelion, and among them Apollo, sweeping the seven-tongued lyre with a golden plectrum, [25][25] led all types of strains. And the Muses began with a prelude to Zeus,... There joyful bands welcome the god with the cry of reed-pipes, and contend with the bold strength of their limbs. [40] The fortune that is born along with a man decides in every deed. And you, Euthymenes from Aegina, have twice fallen into the arms of Victory [NIKE] and attained embroidered hymns [See klęros [Levites, Clergy]  

There joyful bands welcome the god with the cry of reed-pipes, and contend with the bold strength of their limbs. [40] The fortune that is born along with a man decides in every deed. And you, Euthymenes from Aegina, have twice fallen into the arms of Victory and attained embroidered hymns

Aphrodites is Aphroditęs,  Sexual love, a womans form of oath, vehement longing or desire, hedonism, pleasure (outlawed in Romans 15), Chrar, Grace, Aster or Venus or ZOE.  Tormentor to mortals, a spiteful, lazy Goddess. She calls assemblies in the Agora. 
Astęr,  metaph. of illustrious persons, Mousaôn asterakai Charitôn
Charis or Grace is this sense speaks of 4. love-charm, philtre, 2. esp. in erotic sense, of favours granted (v. charizomai 1.3 ), V. daimonôn charis homage due to them, their worship, majesty, charites aphrodisiôn erôtôn

Josephus 8.  note

This mention of the Corinthian ornaments of architecture in Solomon's palace by Josephus seems to be here set down by way of prophecy although it appears to me that the Grecian and Roman most ancient orders of architecture were taken from Solomon's temple, as from their original patterns, yet it is not so clear that the last and most ornamental order of the Corinthian was so ancient, although what the same Josephus says, (Of the War, B. V. ch. 5. sect. 3,) that one of the gates of Herod's temple was built according to the rules of this Corinthian order, is no way improbable, that order being, without dispute, much older than the reign of Herod. 

Phorminx 1 the phorminx, a kind of lyre or harp, the oldest stringed instrument of the Greeks, esp. as the instrument of Apollo, Hom.; with seven strings (after Terpander's time), Pind. [Commonly referred to pherô, as if it were the portable lyre: better perh. from Root .phrem, Lat. fremo, to sound.]

APOLLONIUS "RHODIUS" (AP. RH.)

IV.891-911: And soon they saw a fair island, Anthemoessa, where the clear-voiced Sirens, daughters of Achelous, used to beguile with their sweet songs whoever cast anchor there, and they destroy him. /(vv. 895-6) Them lovely Terpsichore, one of the Muses, bare, united with Achelous/; and once they tended Demeter's noble daughter still unwed, and sang to her in chorus; and at that time they were fashioned in part like birds and in part like maidens to behold. And ever on the watch from their place of prospect with its fair haven, often from many had they taken away their sweet return, consuming them with the waste desire; and suddenly to the heroes, too, they sent forth from their lips a lily-like voice (opa leirion). And they were already about to cast from the ship the hawesers to the shore,

had not Thracian Orpheus, son of Oeagrus, stringing in his hands his Bistonian lyre (phorminx), rung forth the hasty snatch of a rippling melody so that their ears might be filled with the sound of his twanging; and the lyre (phorminx) overcame the maidens' voice.

And the west wind and the sounding wave rushing astern bore the ship on; and the Sirens kept uttering their ceaseless song. 

3 Damônos

Musica, ae, and mu-sice-  mousikę, the art of music, music; acc. to the notions of the ancients, also every higher kind of artistic or scientific culture or pursuit: musicam Damone socci et cothurni,i. e. comic and dramatic poetry, Aus. Ep. 10, 43 : musice antiquis temporibus tantum venerationis habuit, Similar to exegeticemagice-magikos 1 fit for the Magians, factio , o-nis, f. [id.] . II. (Acc. to facio, II. B.; lit., a taking part or siding with any one; hence concr.) A company of persons associated or acting together, a class, order, sect, faction, party (syn.: pars, partes, causa, rebelliopantomimes

4 Thręiki Thraix tôn Horatius Flaccus, Odes 1.18 Who can talk of want or warfare when the wine is in his head, Not of thee, good father Bacchus, and of Venus fair and bright?

But should any dream of licence, there's a lesson may be read,

How 'twas wine that drove the Centaurs with the Lapithae to fight.
And the Thracians too may warn us; truth and falsehood, good and ill,
How they mix them, when the wine-god's hand is heavy on them laid!
Never, never, gracious Bacchus, may I move thee 'gainst thy will,
Or uncover what is hidden in the verdure of thy shade!
Silence thou thy savage cymbals, and the Berecyntine horn;
In their train Self-love still follows, dully, desperately blind,
And Vain-glory, towering upwards in its emptyheaded scorn,   
And the Faith that keeps no secrets, with a window in its mind.

5 Lukophron[os] sunklę  
lukophrôn , onos, ho, , A.wolf-minded, = deinophrôn, Hsch.; andres lukophrones

Used with Auletes, Kerus, Techne
After Israel fell into musical idolatry at Mount Sinai God turned them over to worship the starry host. The Book of the Covenant of Grace was lost and The Book of The Law was imposed until they were returned to Assyria and Babylon for captivity and death to most of the nation.  Moses then wrote an inverted version of the common legends of Babylon, Egypt and Greece to show that Jehovah was the only Elohim and that He made it possible for mankind to REST on that sabbath which was superstitious and led to many abuses.  That means that Moses repudiated the following common Cosmology which informed the superstitious including rejecting predestination.
PRev.Laws50.14 Hesiod, Works and Days: Muses of Pieria who give glory through song, come hither, tell of Zeus your father and chant his praise. Through him mortal men are famed or unfamed, sung or unsung alike, as great Zeus wills. [5] For easily he makes strong, and easily he brings the strong man low; easily he humbles the proud and raises the obscure, and easily he straightens the crooked and blasts the proud,--Zeus who thunders aloft and has his dwelling most high. Attend thou with eye and ear, and make judgements straight with righteousness. [10] And, Perses, I would tell of true things. So, after all, there was not one kind of Strife alone, but all over the earth there are two. As for the one, a man would praise her when he came to understand her; but the other is blameworthy: and they are wholly different in nature. For one fosters evil war and battle, being cruel:
        And he charged Hermes the guide, the Slayer of Argus, to put in her a shameless mind and a deceitful nature. So he ordered. And they obeyed the lord Zeus the son of Cronos. [70] Forthwith the famous Lame God moulded clay in the likeness of a modest maid, as the son of Cronos purposed. And the goddess brighteyed Athena girded and clothed her, and the divine Graces and queenly Persuasion put necklaces of gold upon her, [75] Argus and the rich-haired Hours crowned her head with spring flowers. And Pallas Athena, contrived within her lies and crafty words and a deceitful nature at the will of loud thundering Zeus, [80] and the Herald of the gods put speech in her they who dwelt on . And he called this woman Pandora, because all Olympus gave each a gift, a plague to men who eat bread [alph-ęstęs sweat of the brows, cinaedus of lewd men) bedecked her form with all manner of finery. 

Pandōra 

(Pandôra). The Greek Eve; the first woman on earth. After Prometheus (q.v.) had stolen the heavenly fire, Zeus in revenge caused Hephaestus to make a woman of exquisite beauty who should bring sorrow upon the human race. From her perfection of loveliness and intellect she was called Pandora, “the All-gifted.” She became the wife of Epimetheus, brother of Prometheus, though Epimetheus had been advised to accept nothing that came from Zeus. In the house of Epimetheus stood a closed box or jar containing all the evils possible for man; and this box Pandora out of curiosity opened. The evils poured out when the lid was raised, and though she closed it hastily, she only succeeded in preventing the escape of Hope, which was also in the box (Hesiod. Theog. 571; Op.50). In later times the story was differently told. The box was then said to contain blessings which were thus secured to the human race; but by opening it, Pandora lost them all except Hope ( Hyg. Fab.142). [p. 1167]
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