Escaping God's grace Into legalism With Music


Legalism is any overt action performed to achieve some spiritual power with God or mankind. Musical Facilitators or Manipulators work "to bring people into the presence of God." This may be attempting to worship God by human hands.  The "hidden" gospel is that Christ freed us from the Law of Moses which had been imposed as a BURDEN because of musical idolatry at Mount Sinai.  Primarily the tribe of Levi--cursed by their father--was turned over to worship the starry host.  When people speak of legalists it is often on those who REFUSE to use the patternism of the sacrificial music as God's command for them to impose the same music accepting the massive sowing of discord as an acceptable cost of doing business.

WHAT IS THE GOSPEL

The gospel is not "just Jesus and Him Crucified."  Paul used the word "protos" or first part of the gospel.  The prototype gospel is called by Paul a FORM ot TYPE.  When we are baptized we obey that FORM and then we are free from sin. Mark uses the beginning or ARCHE gospel and then quotes prophecy and speaks of the baptism by John and Jesus through His disciples as the MOST IMPORTANT part of the gospel fort those who do not want to die on the cross like the thief on the cross..

The True gospel is that we can be saved FROM that crooked race so that the Church of Christ defined in the wilderness can operate without any rituals: ekklesia or synagogue is a school of Christ through the prophets and apostles and Christ in Isaiah 55 warned us NOT to give our money for the "free water of the word."  In Isaiah 58 He outlawed seeking our own pleasure or even speaking our own words. That pretty well cuts off at the knees those using the "law of silence to ADD musical noise."

The Conflict, clearly defined in John 17 between the WORD and the world or COSMOS is a conflict between the Word and all of the performing arts and crafts.

Matt. 11:25 At that time Jesus answered and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth,
        because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent,
        and hast revealed th
em unto babes.

The wise are the "doctors of the Law" and the "crooked race" pointing to the skolion musicians in the symposium
Sophos A. skilled in any handicraft or art, clever mantisId.Th.382; “oiōnothetas  Interpreter of signs.
poets and musicians, Pi.O.1.9, P.1.42, 3.113; en kithara s. E.IT1238 (lyr.), cf. Ar.Ra.896

Sophizo practise an art, Thgn.19, IG12.678; play subtle tricks, deal subtly, etc.; ouden sophizomestha toisi daimosi we use no subtleties in dealing with the gods, E.Ba.200;
E.Ba.200 Teiresias
[200] We mortals have no cleverness in the eyes of the the gods. Our ancestral traditions, and those which we have held throughout our lives, no argument will overturn, not even if some craftiness should be discovered by the depths of our wits.  Will anyone say that I do not respect old age, [205] being about to dance with my head covered in ivy? No, for the god has made no distinction as to whether it is right for men young or old to dance, but wishes to have common honors from all and to be extolled, setting no one apart.

2Pet. 1:12 Wherefore I will not be negligent to put you always in remembrance of these things,
        though ye know them, and be established in the present truth.
2Pet. 1:13 Yea, I think it meet, as long as I am in this tabernacle, to stir you up by putting you in remembrance;
2Pet. 1:14 Knowing that shortly I must put off this my tabernacle, even as our Lord Jesus Christ hath shewed me.
2Pet. 1:15 Moreover I will endeavour that ye may be able after my decease to have these things always in remembrance.
2Pet. 1:16 For we have not followed cunningly devised fables, when we made known unto you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but were eyewitnesses of his majesty.
2Pet. 1:17 For he received from God the Father honour and glory, when there came such a voice to him from the excellent glory, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.
2Pet. 1:18 And this voice which came from heaven we heard, when we were with him in the holy mount.
2Pet. 1:19 We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts:
2Pet. 1:20 Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation.
2Pet. 1:21 For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost.
Sophia , Ion. -, h(, prop. A. cleverness or skill in handicraft and art, as in carpentry in music and singing, tekhnē kai s. h.Merc.483, cf. 511; in poetry, Sol.13.52, Pi.O.1.117, Ar.Ra.882, X.An.1.2.8,

Sophistes (Latin) A. master of one's craft, adept, expert, of diviners, Hdt.2.49;
Hdt. 2.49 Now then, it seems to me that Melampus son of Amytheon was not ignorant of but was familiar with this sacrifice. For Melampus was the one who taught the Greeks the name of Dionysus and the way of sacrificing to him and the phallic procession; he did not exactly unveil the subject taking all its details into consideration, for the teachers who came after him made a fuller revelation; but it was from him that the Greeks learned to bear the phallus along in honor of Dionysus, and they got their present practice from his teaching. [2] I say, then, that Melampus acquired the prophetic art, being a discerning man, and that, besides many other things which he learned from Egypt, he also taught the Greeks things concerning Dionysus, altering few of them; for I will not say that what is done in Egypt in connection with the god and what is done among the Greeks originated independently: for they would then be of an Hellenic character and not recently introduced. [3] Nor again will I say that the Egyptians took either this or any other custom from the Greeks. But I believe that Melampus learned the worship of Dionysus chiefly from Cadmus of Tyre and those who came with Cadmus from Phoenicia to the land now called Boeotia.
of poets, “meletan sophistais prosbalonPi.I.5(4).28,
of musicians, “sophistēs . . parapaiōn khelun
with modal words added, “hoi s. tōn hierōn melōn
Melos sp. musical member, phrase: hence, song, strain
2. music to which a song is set, tune, Arist.Po.1450a14; opposite rhuthmos, metron, Pl.Grg. 502c; opp. rhuthmos, rhēma, Id.Lg.656c;
melody of an instrument, “phormigx d' au phtheggoith' hieron m. ēde kai aulos
3. later of the rhētores, Professors of Rhetoric, and prose writers of the Empire
II. from late v B.C., a Sophist, i.e. one who gave lessons in grammar, rhetoric, politics, mathematics, for money, such as Prodicus, Gorgias, Protagoras

Playto, Cratylus says
"the part of appropriative, coercive, hunting art which hunts animals, land animals, tame animals, man, privately, FOR PAY, is paid in CASH, claims to GIVE education, and is a hunt after rich and promising youths, must--so our present argument concludes--be called SOPHISTRY.
In 1 Corinthians 1 Paul refers to Isaiah 33 to prove that there WILL BE NO WISE men in the Church of Christ: that is an absolute.

 For instance, Plato in his Symposium (the crooked race):

§ i. Summary of the Argument.

II. Aristodemus's Prologue: 174 A-178 A.

Aristodemus meeting Socrates smartly attired expresses his surprise at so unusual a circumstance. Socrates explains that being invited to dine with Agathon he feels bound to go “in finery to the fine”; and he presses Aristodemus, although uninvited, to accompany him. On the road Socrates, immersed in thought, lags behind, and Aristodemus arrives at Agathon's alone. Not till they are half-way through the meal does Socrates appear; and Agathon rallies him on his devotion to sophia. The proposal of Pausanias to restrict the potations, in view of yesterday's banquet, and that of Eryximachus to dismiss the flute-girl and amuse themselves by logoi, are unanimously agreed to. Then Eryximachus propounds an idea of Phaedrus, that Eros is the best possible theme for encomia, and suggests that each of the party in turn, commencing with Phaedrus, should now deliver an encomium on Eros. This suggestion is applauded by Socrates. Of the encomia the most noteworthy were the following:—

c The general characteristics (1) of Eros Pandemos are that it is directed to women as well as boys, to the body rather than the soul, to unscrupulous satisfaction of lust; (2) whereas Eros Uranios shuns females and seeks only such males as are noble and nearly mature both in mind and body. It is the followers of Eros Pandemos who have brought paederastia into disrepute.

d The varying nomoi concerning Eros may be classified thus:—
(1) In all Greek states except Athens the nomos is simple, either (a) approving paederastia, as in Elis and Boeotia; or (b) condemning it, as in Ionia and states subject to barbarian rule, where it is held to foster a dangerous spirit of independence (e.g. Harmodius and Aristogiton).

(2) At Athens the nomos is complex. (a) Eros is approved, and its excesses condoned, when directed towards superior youths approaching manhood. (b) It appears to be condemned, in so far as parents forbid their boys to hold converse with “erastae.” The explanation of this ambiguous attitude must be sought in the principle laid down above, that the moral quality of an act depends upon the conditions of its performance. The Athenian nomos provides a test for distinguishing between good and bad forms of Eros: the test of time shows whether or not the right motive (desire for aretē) actuates both the lover and his object. This motive alone justifies all erotic pursuits and surrenders, even mutual deception: hence we conclude that kalon aretēs heneka kharizesthai.

Epilogue: This Eros Uranios, which inspires zeal for aretē, possesses the highest value alike for the individual and for the State.

paidisk-ē , h(, Dim. of pais
Prudent or understanding: Sunetos A. intelligent, sagacious, wise, That simply means the wise can know only what the Son has Revealed to them.

Jesus has removed the Scribes and Pharisees whom He called hypocrites.  In Ezekiel especially the hypocrites include the AUDIENCE which can be attracted to listen and:
Ezek. 33:28 For I will lay the land most desolate, and the pomp of her strength shall cease;
        and the mountains of Israel shall be desolate, that none shall pass through.
Ezek. 33:29 Then shall they know that I am the LORD,
        when I have laid the land most desolate because
        of all their abominations which they have committed.

What are the marks of their abomination?

Ezek. 33:30 Also, thou son of man, the children of thy people
        still are talking against thee by the walls and in the doors of the houses,
        and speak one to another, every one to his brother, saying,
        Come, I pray you, and hear what is the word that cometh forth from the LORD.
Ezek. 33:31 And they come unto thee as the people cometh,
        and they sit before thee as my people,
        and they hear thy words, but they will not do them:

for with their mouth they shew much love,
        but their heart goeth after their covetousness.

What is the worst possible example of people with no intention of hearing or obeying?

Ezek. 33:32 And, lo, thou art unto them
        as a very lovely song
        of one that hath a pleasant voice,
        and can play well on an instrument:
                for they hear thy words, but they do them not.
Ezek. 33:33 And when this cometh to pass, (lo, it will come,)
        then shall they know that a prophet hath been among them.
HOW SHALL WE TREAT THEM?
Luke 17:20 And when he was demanded of the Pharisees, when the kingdom of God should come,
        he answered them and said, The kingdom of God cometh not with observation:
Luke 17:21 Neither shall they say, Lo here! or, lo there!
        for, behold, the kingdom of God is within you.
Luke 17:22 And he said unto the disciples,
        The days will come, when ye shall desire to see one of the days of the Son of man,
        and ye shall not see it.
Luke 17:23 And they shall say to you, See here; or, see there:
        go not after them, nor follow them.
THEREFORE THE PATTERN OF GOD IS

Matt. 11:26 Even so, Father: for so it seemed good in thy sight.
Matt. 11:27 All things are delivered
        unto me of my Father:
        and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father;
        neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son,
        and he to whomsoever the Son will reveal him
.


Jesus as the SON said that the Father was within Him: Jesus of Nazareth was a "body prepared for" Christ to dwell as God's image of full deity.  The Spirit is the "breath" which passes the words of the Father (within) to the lips which are articulated as SONS or WORDS of God.

Jesus, in turned, revealed nothing to anyone, such as Paul, except to be an EYE and EAR witness. Therefore, there is NO person who has any wisdom to go beyond teaching that which has been taught AS it has been taught.

YOU CAN GO AND LISTEN TO THE SPEAKERS AND MUSICIANS AND BE ENSLAVED.

Or, you can "go outside the camp" and suffer reproaches and be taught by Jesus Christ through His Word.

Matt. 11:28 Come unto me,
        all ye that labour
        and are heavy laden,
        and I will give you rest.
Matt. 11:29 Take my yoke upon you,
        and learn of me;  
        for I am meek and lowly in heart:
        and ye shall find rest unto your souls.
Matt. 11:30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light
.

Pattern from the Church of Christ in the wilderness onward:
Acts 15:21 For Moses of old time hath in every city
        them that preach him,
        being read in the synagogues every sabbath day.

Heb. 13:12 Wherefore Jesus also,
        that he might sanctify the people with his own blood,
        suffered without the gate.
Heb. 13:13 Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp,
        bearing his reproach.
Camp Parembole drawing up in battle oder, insertion of men in ranks, company of soldiers,  SOLDEIER'S QUARTERS or barracks Plb. 6.29.1 Phb. 6.31The Camp Marketplace.
Agora business of the agora public speaking, to trade in the market, selling of "biblion" paper, documents, selling of scriptures.  Meeting for games Pi.N.3.14: metaphormurmēkōn a.Luc. Icar.19: prov., theōn a. 'Babel', Suid., etc.
Pi.N.3.14 Queenly Muse, our mother! I entreat you, come in the sacred month of Nemea to the much-visited Dorian island of Aegina. For beside the waters of the Asopus young men are waiting, craftsmen of honey-voiced [5] victory-songs, seeking your voice. Various deeds thirst for various things; but victory in the games loves song most of all, the most auspicious attendant of garlands and of excellence. Send an abundance of it, from my wisdom; [10] begin, divine daughter, an acceptable hymn to the ruler of the cloud-filled sky, and I will communicate it by the voices of those singers and by the lyre. The hymn will have a pleasant toil, to be the glory of the land where the ancient Myrmidons lived, whose marketplace, famous long ago,
metaphormurmēkōn a.Luc. Icar.19: prov., theōn a. 'Babel', Suid., etc.
Murmex   2. murmēkos atrapoi, = murmēkia A Fabulous anamal or beast , Ar.Th. 100.

Aristoph. Thes. 100

Servant—is going to construct the framework of a drama. He is rounding fresh poetical forms, [55] he is polishing them in the lathe and is welding them; he is hammering out sentences and metaphors; he is working up his subject like soft wax. First he models it and then he casts it in bronze—
Mnesilochus—and sways his buttocks amorously.
ServantWho is the rustic that approaches this sacred enclosure?
MnesilochusTake care of yourself and of your [60] sweet-voiced poet! I have a strong tool here both well rounded and well polished, which will pierce your enclosure and penetrate you.
Euripides That's the man they are bringing out yonder on the eccyclema.
        Agathon appears on the eccyclema, softly reposing on a bed,
        clothed in a saffron tunic, and surrounded with feminine toilet articles.

MnesilochusI am blind then! I see no man here, I only see Cyrene.
Euripides Be still! He is getting ready to sing. [Melodeo]
Mnesilochus[100] What subtle trill, I wonder, is he going to warble to us?
[Melodeo]
Plat. Laws 655d [655d] of affording pleasure to the soul. But such an assertion is quite intolerable, and it is blasphemy even to utter it. The fact which misleads us is more probably the following—

Clinias What?

Athenian Inasmuch as choric performances are representations of character, exhibited in actions and circumstances of every kind, in which, the several performers enact their parts by habit and imitative art, whenever the choric performances are congenial to them in point of diction, tune or other features (whether from natural bent or from habit, or from all these causes combined),

i.e. music is commonly judged solely by the amount of pleasure it affords, without any regard to the quality of the pleasure. The Athenian proceeds to show how dangerous a doctrine this is: music, he maintains, should not be used merely to pander to the low tastes of the populace, but rather treated as an educational instrument for the elevation of public morals.

Heb. 13:14 For here have we no continuing city,
        but we seek one to come.
Heb. 13:15 By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually,
        that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name.

And Christ in the prophecies and the prophecies made more certain SUPPLIES it all

Isa 57:15 For thus saith the high and lofty One that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy
        I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit, 
        to revive the spirit of the humble, and to revive the heart of the contrite ones.

Isa 57:16 For I will not contend for ever, neither will I be always wroth: 
        for the spirit should fail before me, and the souls which I have made.

Isa 57:17 For the iniquity of his covetousness was I wroth, and smote him: I hid me, and was wroth, 
        and he went on frowardly in the way of his heart.

Prophetic:

Isa 57:18 I have seen his ways, and will heal him: 
        I will lead him also, and restore comforts unto him and to his mourners.

Is. 57:19 I create the fruit
        of the lips;
        Peace, peace to him that is far off,
        and to him that is near,
        saith the LORD; and I will heal him.

Fruit or
fructus ,use and enjoyment which proceeds from
Cic. Off. 2.3 [3] I would that the government had stood fast in the position
        it had begun to assume and had not fallen into the hands of men
        who desired not so much to reform as to abolish the constitution.
For then, in the first placeI should be committing to written form
        not these present essays but my public speeches,
        as I often formerly did.
But when the republic, to which all my care and thought and effort used to be devoted,
        was no more, then, of course,
        my voice was silenced in the forum and in the senate.  Cic. Off. 2.2
WHY THE APOSTLES RECORDED THE TRUTH
2Pet. 1:3 According as his divine power hath given unto
        us all things that pertain unto life and godliness,
        through the knowledge of him that hath called us to glory and virtue:
2Pet. 1:12 Wherefore I will not be negligent to put you always in remembrance of these things,
        though ye know them, and be established in the present truth.
2Pet. 1:13 Yea, I think it meet, as long as I am in this tabernacle,
        to stir you up by putting you in remembrance;
2Pet. 1:14 Knowing that shortly I must put off this my tabernacle, even as our Lord Jesus Christ hath shewed me.
2Pet. 1:15 Moreover I will endeavour
        that ye may be able after my decease
        to have these things always in remembrance.
2Pet. 1:16 For we have not followed cunningly devised fables,
        when we made known unto you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ,
        but were eyewitnesses of his majesty.

2Pet. 1:17 For he received from God the Father honour and glory, when there came such a voice to him from the excellent glory, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.
2Pet. 1:18 And this voice which came from heaven we heard, when we were with him in the holy mount.
2Pet. 1:19 We have also a more sure word of prophecy;
        whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place,
        until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hearts:
2Pet. 1:20 Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation.
2Pet. 1:21 For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost.

2Pet. 2:1 But there were false prophets also among the people, even as there shall be false teachers among you, who privily shall bring in damnable heresies, even denying the Lord that bought them, and bring upon themselves swift destruction.
2Pet. 2:2 And many shall follow their pernicious ways; by reason of whom the way of truth shall be evil spoken of.
2Pet. 2:3 And through covetousness shall they with feigned words make merchandise of you: whose judgment now of a long time lingereth not, and their damnation slumbereth not.

NOMOS as LAW which plagued Israel after their musical idolatry at Mount Sinai was the musical presentation of the laws of Apollo or the Abaddon or Apollyon in the book of Revelation.

The end time musical "worship" is defined by John as that of the "holy harlot" who is defined as Lucifer or the "singing and harp playing prostitute" in the garden of Eden and of the king or queen of Babylon who went into "hell" with his still-living harpists and their harps.

See another summary of music "as worship." Musical words such as MUSICA or CANTUS speak of inflicting people in order to control their actions. For instance, there is a clear link between CHARISMATIC and pederasty.

Music and ritual are "borrowed" from the Old Testament sacrificial system which was just to remind Israel of their fatal sin with music and idolatry at Mount Sinai. Levitical musicians organized under the king of the nation and the 'commanders of the army' are the legalistic authority for musical worship teams to try, like Nimrod, to "revive people with external means."

This "religion" or worship is the Greek threskia and identifies the form attributed to Orpheus and the Lesbian musicians. The goal was to create ANXIETY which was not religious but an imposed burden. In the Old Testament when God sings a BURDEN it is a doom:

WHAT IS THE BURDEN THAT THEY SCRIBES AND PHARISEES, HYPOCRITES, WANT TO BURDEN ON US? 

THE burden of Damascus. Behold, Damascus is taken away from being a city, and it shall be a ruinous heap. Isa 17:1

A burden is:
Massa (h4853) mas-saw'; from 5375; a burden; spec. tribute, or (abstr.) porterage; fig. an utterance, chiefly a doom, espec. singing; mental, desire: - burden, carry away, prophecy, * they set, song, tribute.
Also, thou son of man, shall it not be in the day when I take from them their strength, the joy of their glory, the desire of their eyes, and that whereupon they set their minds, their sons and their daughters, Eze.24:25
 
THE burden of the word of the Lord for Israel, saith the Lord, which stretcheth forth the heavens, and layeth the foundation of the earth, and formeth the spirit of man within him. Zech 12:1
 
Behold, I will make Jerusalem a cup of trembling unto all the people round about, when they shall be in the siege both against Judah and against Jerusalem. Zech 12:2
 
And in that day will I make Jerusalem a burdensome stone for all people: all that burden themselves with it shall be cut in pieces, though all the people of the earth be gathered together against it. Zech 12:3
 
Ro.15:1 WE then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to PLEASE ourselves.
 
Aresko (g700) ar-es'-ko; prob. from 142 (through the idea of exciting emotion); to be agreeable (or by impl. to seek to be so): - please.

Areskô I. of pers. only, make good, make amends, spondas theois aresasthai make full drink-offerings to the gods, please, satisfy, be Lord and Master.

IV. areskei is used impers. to express the opinion or resolution of a public body, also of prevailing opinions; ta areskonta the dogmas of philosophers

please, satisfy, despozô 2. c. gen., to be lord or master of, h.Cer.365, Hdt.3.142 as law-term, to be the legal proprietor,

Nasa (h5347) accept, advance, arise, (able to, [armour], suffer to) bear (-er, up), bring (forth), burn, carry (away), cast, contain, desire, ease, exact, exalt (self), extol... utterly, wear, yield
Airo (h142) ah'ee-ro; a prim. verb; to lift; by impl. to take up or away; fig. to raise (the voice), keep in suspense (the mind); spec. to sail away (i.e. weigh anchor); by Heb. [comp. 5375] to expiate sin: - away with, bear (up), carry, lift up, loose, make to doubt, put away, remove, take (away, up).

The burden in Greek includes:

epōd-os , on, (epadō A. singing to or over, using songs or charms to heal wounds, “epōdoi muthoiPl.Lg.903b.

b. Subst., enchanter,e. kai goēsE.Hipp. 1038 (but “goēs e.Ba.234): c. gen., a charm for or against,ethusen hautou paida epōdon Thrēkiōn aēmatōnA.Ag.1418 ; e. tōn toioutōn one to charm away such fears, Pl.Phd.78a.

2. epōdos, ho, verse or passage returning at intervals, in Alcaics and Sapphics, D.H.Comp.19 ; chorus, burden, refrain, Ph. 1.312 : metaph., ho koinos hapasēs adoleskhias e. the 'old story', Plu.2.507e.

-Phortos is less complicated but is the same meaning as Phortos

A. load, freight, cargo, Od.8.163, 14.296, Hes.Op. 631, Hdt.1.1, S.Tr.537, and later Prose, as PEnteux.2.11 (iii B. C.), Plu.Marc.14, Luc.VH1.34; epoiēsanto me ph., expld. as pepragmateumai, prodedomai, phortos gegenēmai, Call.Fr.4.10P.; ph. erōtos, of Europa on the bull, Batr.78, cf. Nonn.D.4.118.
2. metaph., heavy load or burden, ph. khreias, kakōn, E.Supp.20, IT1306; cf. phortion.
II. Att., vulgar stuff, rubbish, balderdash, Ar.Pax748 (anap.) Pl.796.
III. mass of detail, 'stuff', in semi-colloquial sense, Aret.CD1.4

BURDEN IS: Airo (h142) ah'ee-ro; a prim. verb; to lift; by impl. to take up or away; fig. to raise (the voice), keep in suspense (the mind); spec. to sail away (i.e. weigh anchor); by Heb. [comp. 5375] to expiate sin: - away with, bear (up), carry, lift up, loose, make to doubt, put away, remove, take (away, up).

Rom. 15:1  We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves. 

G700 aresky ar-es'-ko Probably from G142 (through the idea of exciting emotion); to be agreeable (or by implication to seek to be so):please.

aeirō , II. raise up, exalt, “apo smikrou d' an areias meganA.Ch.262, cf. 791 
esp. of pride and passion, exalt, excite, hupsou ai. thumon grow excited, S.OT914

Soph. OT 914 Iocasta
Princes of the land, I am planning to visit the shrines of the gods, with this wreathed branch and these gifts of incense in my hands. For Oedipus excites his soul excessively with all sorts of grief, [915] as he does not judge the new things from the old, like a man of sense, but is under the control of the speaker, if he speaks of frightful things. Since, then, I can do no good by counsel, to you, Lycean Apollo—for you are nearest— [920] I have come as a suppliant with these symbols of prayer, that you may find us some escape from uncleanliness. For now we are all afraid, like those who see fear in the helmsman of their ship.

2. raise by words, hence, praise, extol, E.Heracl.322, etc.; ai. logō to exaggerate, D.21.71.
Eur. Heraclid. 297 The children and the Chorus clasp hands.
My children, we have put our friends to the test. [310] And so if you ever return to your country and live in your ancestral home and <get back again> your patrimony, you must consider <the rulers of this land> for all time as your saviors and friends. Remember never to raise a hostile force against this land, but consider it always your greatest friend. The Athenians are worthy of your reverence [315] seeing that in exchange for us they took the enmity of the great land of Argos and its army, even though they saw that we were wandering beggars [they did not give us up or drive us from the land]. [320] In life <I shall proclaim to everyone your nobility>, and in death, when I die, I shall stand next to Theseus and extoll you in praise and cheer him with this story, that in kindness you took in and defended the children of Heracles and that you enjoy good repute throughout all Hellas [325] and keep your father's reputation and, though born of noble stock, you in no way prove less noble than your father. Of few others can this be said: only one man out of a great multitude can be found who is not inferior to his father.
BURDEN IS:  Epoiēsanto A. make, produce, first of something material, as manufactures, works of art,
expld. as pepragmateumai, prodedomai, phortos gegenēmai,

A. Pragmateuomai 
work at at thing, labour to bring it about, take in hand, treat laboriously, be engaged in. Work at writing religious poetry for use around the shrine or Hieros the temple of Athena for the hierodoulo
     Hierodoulos  Nethinim 1 Esdras 1:2 especially of the temple courtesans at Corinth and elsewhere
      also male prostitutes.
Str.8.6.20, 6.2.6; Neokoros
Strab. 8.6.20 Again, Demaratus, one of the men who had been in power at Corinth, fleeing from the seditions there, carried with him so much wealth from his home to Tyrrhenia that not only he himself became the ruler of the city  that admitted him, but his son was made king of the Romans. And the temple of Aphrodite was so rich that it owned more than a thousand temple slaves, courtesans, whom both men and women had dedicated to the goddess. And therefore it was also on account of these women that the city was crowded with people and grew rich; for instance, the ship captains freely squandered their money, and hence the proverb, “"Not for every man is the voyage to Corinth."”Source unknown Moreover, it is recorded that a certain courtesan said to the woman who reproached her with the charge that she did not like to work or touch wool: "Yet, such as I am, in this short time I have taken down three webs." [debauched three ship captains]

Strab. 11.4.7 As for gods, they honor Helius, [Sun] Zeus, and Selene, [moon] but especially Selene; her temple is near Iberia. The office of priest is held by the man who, after the king, is held in highest honor; he has charge of the sacred land, which is extensive and well-populated, and also of the temple slaves [Hierodoulos ], many of whom are subject to religious frenzy and utter prophecies. And any one of those who, becoming violently possessed, wanders alone in the forests, is by the priest arrested, bound with sacred fetters, and sumptuously maintained during that year, and then led forth to the sacrifice that is performed in honor of the goddess, and, being anointed, is sacrificed along with other victims. The sacrifice is performed as follows: Some person holding a sacred lance, with which it is the custom to sacrifice human victims, comes forward out of the crowd and strikes the victim through the side into the heart, he being not without experience in such a task; and when the victim falls, they draw auguries from his fal and declare them before the public; and when the body is carried to a certain place, they all trample upon it, thus using it as a means of purification. 

Nekoros custodion of the temple high priest Aeditus, Vulg. Ezech. 44, 1 II. a title of Asiatic towns, which had built a temple in honour of their patron-god, as Ephesus was, n. Artemidos

B.  Prodidomi pay in advance, play false, be guilty of treachery, surrender

C. Phortos

D. Gignomai  come into a new state of being: hence, of a thing produced, 

BURDEN IS:  4. after Hom., of Poets, compose, write, p. dithurambon, epea, Hdt.1.23, 4.14; “p.
Represent in verse,or poetry, invent, represent, myths, comedy, tragedy 

BURDEN IS: erōs , ōtos, o(, acc. erōn —love, mostly of the sexual passion, name of the klēros Aphroditēs,
     III. of the Levites, “Kurios autos klēros autouLXX De.18.2:

Aphrodite or ZOE is the Musical Worship Minister: that is a burden Jesus died to PRY OFF.

BURDEN IS: 2. metaph., heavy load or burden, ph. khreias, kakōn, E.Supp.20, IT1306; cf. phortion.
Eur. Supp. 20 Before the temple of Demeter at Eleusis. On the steps of the great altar is seated Aethra. Around her, in the garb of suppliants, is the Chorus of Argive mothers. Adrastus lies on the ground before the altar, crushed in abject grief. The children of the slain chieftains stand nearby. Around the altar are the attendants of the goddess. 
BURDEN IS: II. Att., vulgar stuff, rubbish, balderdash, Ar.Pax748 (anap.) Pl.796.
Aristoph. Peace 748 Chorus
The Chorus turns and faces the audience.
Undoubtedly the comic poet who [735] mounted the stage to praise himself in the parabasis would deserve to be handed over to the sticks of the beadles. Nevertheless, oh Muse, if it be right to esteem the most honest and illustrious of our comic writers at his proper value, permit our poet to say that he thinks he has deserved a glorious renown. First of all, he is the one who has compelled his rivals no longer [740] to scoff at rags or to war with lice;
        and as for those Heracleses, always chewing and ever hungry,
        he was the first to cover them with ridicule and to chase them from the stage;
he has also dismissed that slave, whom one never failed to set weeping before you, [745] so that his comrade might have the chance of jeering at his stripes and might ask, “Wretch, what has happened to your hide? Has the lash rained an army of its thongs on you and laid your back waste?” After having delivered us from all these wearisome ineptitudes and these low buffooneries,
        he has built up for us a great art, like a palace with high towers,
       [750] constructed of fine phrases, great thoughts and of jokes not common on the streets.
Moreover it's not obscure private persons or women that he stages in his comedies; but, bold as Heracles, it's the very greatest whom he attacks, undeterred by the fetid stink of leather or the threats of hearts of mud. 
THE burden of Damascus. Behold, Damascus is taken away from being a city, and it shall be a ruinous heap. Isa 17:1

A burden is:
Massa (h4853) mas-saw'; from 5375; a burden; spec. tribute, or (abstr.) porterage; fig. an utterance, chiefly a doom, espec. singing; mental, desire: - burden, carry away, prophecy, * they set, song, tribute.
Also, thou son of man, shall it not be in the day when I take from them their strength, the joy of their glory, the desire of their eyes, and that whereupon they set their minds, their sons and their daughters, Eze.24:25
 
THE burden of the word of the Lord for Israel, saith the Lord, which stretcheth forth the heavens, and layeth the foundation of the earth, and formeth the spirit of man within him. Zech 12:1
 
Behold, I will make Jerusalem a cup of trembling unto all the people round about, when they shall be in the siege both against Judah and against Jerusalem. Zech 12:2
 
And in that day will I make Jerusalem a burdensome stone for all people: all that burden themselves with it shall be cut in pieces, though all the people of the earth be gathered together against it. Zech 12:3
 
Ro.15:1 WE then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to PLEASE ourselves.
 
Aresko (g700) ar-es'-ko; prob. from 142 (through the idea of exciting emotion); to be agreeable (or by impl. to seek to be so): - please.

Areskô I. of pers. only, make good, make amends, spondas theois aresasthai make full drink-offerings to the gods, please, satisfy, be Lord and Master.

IV. areskei is used impers. to express the opinion or resolution of a public body, also of prevailing opinions; ta areskonta the dogmas of philosophers

please, satisfy, despozô 2. c. gen., to be lord or master of, h.Cer.365, Hdt.3.142 as law-term, to be the legal proprietor,

Laden is:
Impure Religion is:
Phortizo (g5412) for-tid'-zo; from 5414; to load up (prop. as aa vessel or animal), i.e. (fig.) to overburden with ceremony or spiritual anxiety: - lade, be heavy laden.
Threskeia (g2356) thrace-ki'-ah; from a der. of 2357; ceremonial observance: - religion, worshipping.

Let no man beguile you of your reward in a voluntary humility and worshiping of angels, intruding into those things which he hath not seen, vainly puffed up by his fleshly mind, Col.2:18  

-Phort-izô , load, load them with burdens, encumber the eyes, ophthalmos 

Rev. 3:17 Because thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked:
Rev. 3:18 I counsel thee to buy of me gold tried in the fire, that thou mayest be rich; and white raiment, that thou mayest be clothed, and that the shame of thy nakedness do not appear; and anoint thine eyes with eyesalve, that thou mayest see. 

Apotithemi 6. apethēkato kolpōn, of a woman, laid down the burden of her womb

7. mēden apotithesthai tōn gignomenōn expose none of one's childre [Abortion] Arist.Pol.1335b22.

Phort-izô  auchena ph Aenigma Sphingis

-Auchena the neck or throat metaphor to be high-spirited

Homer Iliad 7. Then the one of them slew the son of king Areithous, Menesthius, that dwelt in Arne, who was born of the mace-man [10] Areithous and ox-eyed Phylomedusa; and Hector with his sharp spear smote Eioneus on the neck beneath the well-wrought helmet of bronze, and loosed his limbs. And Glaucus, son of Hippolochus, leader of the Lycians, made a cast with his spear in the fierce conflict at Iphinous, [15] son of Dexios, as he sprang upon his car behind his swift mares, and smote him upon the shoulder; so he fell from his chariot to the ground and his limbs were loosed.

hupsêlos II. metaph., high, lofty, stately, proud, thespesios 

Pindar Olympian 2. When deeds have been accomplished, whether justly or contrary to justice, not even Time the father of all things could undo the outcome. But forgetfulness may come, with favorable fortune. Under the power of noble joys, malignant pain [20] is subdued and dies, [21] whenever god-sent Fate lifts prosperity on high. This saying applies to the daughters of Cadmus on their lovely thrones: they suffered greatly, but their heavy sorrow collapsed in the presence of greater blessings.

Pindar, Pythian 3.  But if any mortal has the path of truth in his mind, he must fare well at the hands of the gods as he has the opportunity. But the winds are changeable [105] that blow on high. The prosperity of men does not stay secure for long, when it follows weighing upon them in abundance. [107] I will be small when my fortunes are small, great when they are great. I will honor in my mind the fortune that attends me from day to day, tending it to the best of my ability. [110] But if a god were to give me luxurious wealth, I hope that I would find lofty fame in the future. We know of Nestor and Lycian Sarpedon, whom men speak of, from melodious words which skilled craftsmen join together. Through renowned songs excellence [115] gains a long life. But few find that easy to accomplish.

Thespesios A. divinely sounding, divinely sweet, aoidê Il.2.600 ;

Homer Iliad 2 where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, [600] and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy; 

Aenigma (ainigma). A riddle. The Greeks were especially fond of riddles, the propounding of which even formed a part of some of their semireligious festivals (see Agrionia);

(Agriônia). A festival celebrated chiefly at Orchomenus, in Boeotia, in honour of Dionysus, surnamed Agriônios, i. e. the wild. This festival was solemnized only by women and priests of Dionysus. It consisted of a kind of game, in which the women for a long time acted as if seeking Dionysus, and at last called out to one another that he had escaped to the Muses, and had concealed himself with them. After this they prepared a repast, and, having enjoyed it, amused themselves with solving riddles. This festival was remarkable for a feature which proves its great antiquity. Some virgins, who were descended from the Minyans, and who probably used to assemble around the temple on the occasion, fled, and were followed by the priest armed with a sword, who was allowed to kill the one whom he first caught. This sacrifice of a human being, though originally it must have formed a regular part of the festival, seems to have been avoided in later times. One instance, however, occurred in the days of Plutarch (Quaest. Graec. 38).

Euripides Phoenissae Jocasta: When my son had become a man, with tawny beard, either because he had guessed or learned it from another, he set out for the shrine of Phoebus [Apollo], wanting to know for certain who his parents were;... Now when the Sphinx was oppressing and ravaging our city, after my husband's death, my brother Creon proclaimed my marriage: that he would marry me to anyone who should guess the riddle of the crafty maiden [Mousa]. It happened somehow [50]  that my son, Oedipus, guessed the Sphinx's song; [and so he became king of this land] and received the scepter of this land as his prize. He married his mother in ignorance, luckless wretch! nor did his mother know that she was sleeping with her son.

Crafty maiden Mousa sonnected with Dionusos, Aeido, Aoidao, Apollon, etc.

Anamelpo, raise a strain, harmonian, melos, praise in songe

Phort-izô   Ev.Luc.11.46; perissêi dapanê  ph. ta koina A massive burden

Perissos A.beyond the regular number or size, prodigious, 2.out of the common, extraordinary, strange, II. more than sufficient, superfluous, 2. in bad sense, superfluous, useless, poetry,

Luke 11:44 Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites!
        for ye are as graves which appear not, and the men that walk over them are not aware of them.
Luke 11:45 Then answered one of the lawyers, and said unto him,
        Master, thus saying thou reproachest us also.
Luke 11:46 And he said, Woe unto you also, ye lawyers
        for ye lade men with burdens grievous to be borne,
        and ye yourselves touch not the burdens with one of your fingers.

Dapan-ê  A. cost, expenditure,Hes.Op.723

Daphne of the chorodidaskal-os A. trainer of the chorusorgeônikos

Orgeôn 1 [perh. from orgia] at Athens, a citizen from every dêmos, who had to perform certain sacrifices: then, generally, a priest, Aesch.:--an epic acc. pl. orgeionas in Hhymn. thrêsk-eia ,

orgi-a , iôn, ta,
A. secret rites, secret worship, practised by the initiated, a post-Hom. word ; used of the worship of Demeter at Eleusis, h.Cer.273,476. Ar.Ra.386, Th.948 ; of the rites of the Cabeiri and Demeter Achaia, Hdt.2.51,5.61; of Orpheus, Id.2.81; of Eumolpus, App.Anth.1.318 ; of Cybele, E.Ba.78 (lyr.): most freq. of the rites of Dionysus, Hdt.2.81, E.Ba.34, al., Theoc.26.13.
II. generally, rites, sacrifices, SIG57.4 (Milet., v B. C.), A.Th.179 (lyr.), S.Tr.765, Ant.1013 ; orgia Mousôn Ar.Ra.356. 

Aristophanes, Frogs 354. Chorus
Let him be mute and stand aside from our sacred dances
who has no experience of mystical language, or has not cleansed his mind
Who never has seen and never has danced in the rites of the noble Muses
Nor ever has been inducted into the Bacchic mysteries of beef-eating Cratinus
Or who takes delight in foolish words when doing this is ill-timed,
Whoever does not eliminate hateful factionalism, and is disagreeable to the citizens,
but kindles and fans civil strife, in his thirst for private advantage:
Whoever takes bribes when guiding the state through the midst of a storm
Or betrays our forts or our ships, smuggles contraband from Aegina
As Thorycion did, that wretched collector of taxes

Sending pads and sails and pitch to Epidauros,
Or persuades anyone to send supplies to the enemies' ships,
Or defiles Hecate's shrine, while singing dithyrambs,
Or any politician who bites off the pay of the poets
For being ridiculed in the ancestral rites of Dionysus.
All these I warn, and twice I warn, and thrice I warn again,
stand aside from our mystical dances; but as for you: arouse the song
and the night-long dances, that belong to our festival here
.

Daphne of the Bachanalia also called Dionysia, in GrecoRoman religion, any of the several festivals of Bacchus (Dionysus), the wine god. They probably originated as rites of fertility gods. The most famous of the Greek Dionysia were in Attica and included the Little, or Rustic, Dionysia, characterized by simple, oldfashioned rites; the Lenaea, which included a festal procession and dramatic performances; the Anthesteria, essentially a drinking feast; the City, or Great, Dionysia, accompanied by dramatic performances in the theatre of Dionysus, which was the most famous of all; and the Oschophoria ("Carrying of the Grape Clusters").

koina
4. in magical formulae, of words added at will by the user, 'and so forth', freq.in Pap., PMag.Osl.1.255, PMag.Par.1.273, al.; koina hosa theleis ib.2.53; ho k. logos PMag.Lond.46.435 ; cf. koinologia.
Ethelô or thelô, metaphor, parodies used in the synagogues.
3. in phrases expressive of meaning, to thelei sêmainein to teras Hdt.1.78 ; to thelei to epos eipai Id.6.37 ; to thelei ta dôra legein Id.4.131 ; to epos touto ethelei legein hôs . . Id.2.13.
Heredotus 4: CXXXI. After such a thing had happened several times, Darius was finally at a loss; and when they perceived this, the Scythian kings sent a herald to Darius with the gift of a bird, a mouse, a frog, and five arrows. [2] The Persians asked the bearer of these gifts what they meant; but he said that he had only been told to give the gifts and then leave at once; he told the Persians to figure out what the presents meant themselves, if they were smart enough
VII. of forbidden meats, common, profane, phagein k. kai akatharton Act.Ap.10.14 , cf. Ep.Rom.14.14; k. chersi esthiein Ev.Marc.7.2 .
agor-euô ( [agora] ), impf. êgoreuon, speak in the assembly, harangue, tell a tale,
Xenophon, Anabasis 5.6. [29] Now Silanus, the soothsayer, answered me in respect to the main issue that the omens were favourable (for he knew well enough that I was not unacquainted with divination, from being always present at the sacrifices); but he said that there appeared in the omens a kind of fraud and plot against me, manifestly because he knew that he was himself plotting to traduce me before you. For he spread abroad the report that I was intending to do these things at once, without getting your consent.

[30] "And I, Seuthes, give you myself and these my comrades to be your faithful friends; and not one of them do I give against his will, but all are even more desirous than I of being your friends.

[31] And now they are here, asking you for nothing more, but rather putting themselves in your hands and willing to endure toil and danger on your behalf.

With them, if the gods so will, you will acquire great territory, recovering all that belonged to your fathers and gaining yet more, and you will acquire many horses, and many men and fair women; and these things you will not need to take as plunder, but my comrades of their own accord shall bring them before you as gifts."

[32] Up rose Seuthes, drained the horn with Xenophon, and joined him in sprinkling the last drops.8

After this there came in musicians blowing upon horns such as they use in giving signals, and playing upon trumpets of raw ox-hide not only measured notes, but music like that of a harp.

ômo-boeios 

[32] anastas ho Seuthês sunexepie kai sunkateskedasato met' autou to keras. meta tauta eisêlthon kerasi te hoiois sêmainousin aulountes kai salpinxin ômoboeiais rhuthmous te kai hoion magadi salpizontes. [33] And Seuthes himself got up, raised a war-cry, and sprang aside very nimbly, as though avoiding a missile. There entered also a company of buffoons

III. with Preps., eis koinon in common, in public,

Maniôdês , FURTHER: 2. like a madman, crazy kunas

kuôn II. as a word of reproach, freq. in Hom. of women, to denote shamelessness or audacity; applied by Helen to herself rhapsôidos k 3. of the Cynics, areskei toutois kunôn metamphiennusthai bion. Catamites.

Areskos is the SELF pleasing Paul forbids in the synagogue in Romans 15.  This is connected to music and the "reproaches" prophesied about Jesus which means to MAKE HIM NAKED.

Jesus provided and Paul commanded worship in the PLACE of the human spirit because "outside" there be dogs and concision: the WOLVES of Acts 20 who bring in the religious musicians who were always perverted: the Muses under Apollyon in Revelation are identified as vile whores.  Anyone who sells their BODIES in any way when Jesus has paid it all is an adulterer: one who corrupts the word or sells learning at retail.

II. causing madness, Dsc. 1.68, 4.68; himasthlê Panos Nonn.D.10.4 .Pan is horn footed

Euripides, Bacchae Pentheus

[215] I happened to be at a distance from this land, when I heard of strange evils throughout this city, that the women have left our homes in contrived Bacchic rites, and rush about in the shadowy mountains, honoring with dances [220] this new deity Dionysus, whoever he is. I hear that mixing-bowls stand full in the midst of their assemblies, and that they each creep off different ways into secrecy to serve the beds of men, on the pretext that they are Maenads worshipping; [225] but they consider Aphrodite before Bacchus.

As many of them as I have caught, servants keep in the public strongholds with their hands bound, and as many as are absent I will hunt from the mountains, [I mean Ino and Agave, who bore me to Echion, and [230] Autonoe, the mother of Actaeon.] And having bound them in iron fetters, I will soon stop them from this ill-working revelry. And they say that some stranger has come, a sorcerer, a conjuror from the Lydian land, [235] fragrant in hair with golden curls, having in his eyes the wine-dark graces of Aphrodite. He is with the young girls day and night, alluring them with joyful mysteries. If I catch him within this house, [240] I will stop him from making a noise with the thyrsos and shaking his hair, by cutting his head off.

"Women and girls from the different ranks of society were proud to enter the service of the gods as singers and musicians. The understanding of this service was universal: these singers constituted the 'harem of the gods'." (End of Quasten Click to see Music and the Feminine connection)

Spurgeon, Commentary on Psalm 42

"Praise the Lord with the harp. Israel was at school, and used childish things to help her to learn; but in these days when Jesus gives us spiritual food, one can make melody without strings and pipes. We do not need them. They would hinder rather than help our praise. Sing unto him. This is the and best music. No instrument like the human voice.

What a degradation to supplant the intelligent song of the whole congregation by the theatrical prettiness of a quartet, bellows, and pipes. We might as well pray by machinery as praise by it. (Charles )

Charles Spurgeon Psalm 149 Ver. 3. Let them sing praises unto him with the timbrel and harp. They who from hence urge the use of music in religious worship, must, by the same rule, introduce dancing, for they went together, as in David's dancing before the ark (Jud 21:21). But whereas many Scriptures in the New Testament keep up singing as a gospel ordinance, none provide for the keeping up of music and dancing; the gospel canon for Psalmody is to "sing with the spirit and with the understanding." --Matthew Henry.

The toph or tambourine or Tabret gave its name to Topheth which had once been king Solomon's Music Grove. This word came to stand for HELL just outside of Jerusalem also called SODOM.

Ver. 3. Timbrel. The toph was employed by David in all the festivities of religion (2Sa 6:5). The occasions on which it was used were mostly joyful and those who played upon it were generally females (Ps 68:25), as was the case among most ancient nations, and is so at the present day in the East.
2 Sam 6:5 And David and all the house of Israel played before the Lord
............ on all manner of instruments made of fir wood,
............ even on harps, and on psalteries, and on timbrels,
............ and on cornets, and on cymbals.
The usages of the modern East might adequately illustrate all the scriptural allusions to this instrument, but happily we have more ancient and very valuable illustration from the monuments of Egypt. In these we find that the tambourine was a favourite instrument, both on sacred and festive occasions. There were three kinds, differing, no doubt, in sound as well as in form; one was circular, another square or oblong, and the third consisted of two squares separated by a bar. They were all beaten by the land, and often used as an accompaniment to the harp and other instruments. The tambourine was usually played by females, who are represented as dancing to its sound without the accompaniment of any other instrument. --John Kitto.
After the "burdens" were removed by Jesus, Paul redefined what we call "music." He demanded that we fill up with the Word of Jesus (Spirit) and teach one another with inspired Biblical resources. The internal effect would be "singing and making melody in the heart and directed to God."

Refusing to "go beyond that which is written" and affirm and fellowship (worship with) those who add mechanical devices is, in the upside-down world of the Post-Modern world, legalism.

However, because rejecting "doctrine" blinds eyes and plugs ears, we propose to show (without a story line or plot or conclusion) that adding any form of external ritual directed to the senses of sight, smell and sound in the belief that people can be "revived" by these toilsome acts is true legalism.

And further, this legalism is not a sign of faith and accepting the grace of Christ's one-time acts, but a sign of the loss of faith and grace as an end-time sign of the rejection of Scripture "as it has been delivered to us." Music as enchantment power has always been at the root of many ancient myths. However,

"Based on the concept of an organic pattern in the life course of civilization, a morphology of history: the idea that every culture has its period of youth, its period of culmination, its years then of beginning to totter with age and of striving to hold itself together by means of rational planning, projects, and organization, only finally to terminate in decrepitude, petrification... and no more life.

Moreover, in this view of Spengler's, we were at present on the point of passing from what he called the period of Culture to Civilization,
which is to say, from our periods of youthful, spontaneous, and
wonderful creativity to those of

uncertainty and anxiety,
contrived programs, and the beginning of the end
.
"

(Campbell, Joseph, Myths to Live By, p. 84)

Music is appropriated from Jewish Legalism by the authority of Post-Modern theology. This new period of "civilization" puts its "trust" in "just the fact of Jesus" while claiming their own "direct assignment from God" to be new Christs. This frees them from "doctrine" or the teachings of the outmoded Jesus or Paul.

As a result of this repudiation of scripture, God is repudiated and the only thing left is to "play" or pretend to move the worshipers into God's presence by manipulating their human senses. However,

"Jingling, banging, and rattling accompanied heathen cults, and the frenzying shawms of a dozen ecstatic cries intoxicated the masses. Amid this euphoric farewell feast of a dying civilization, the voices of nonconformists were emerging from places of Jewish and early Christian worship ..." (Encyclopaedia Judaica, 1971 ed., s.v. "Music")

This frenzy of anxiety is the result of escaping God's grace into neo-legalism or ceremonial legalism.


-


Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. 2 Pe.1:20
Epilusis (g1955) ep-il'-oo-sis; from 1956; explanation, i.e. application: - interpretation.
Epiluo (g1956) ep-ee-loo'-o; from 1909 and 3089; to solve further, i.e. (fig.) to explain, decide: - determine, expound.

The Scriptures speak for themselves and in SCHOOL they should be "taught as they have been taught." There is no handle by which professional scholars, speakers or musicians can get closer access than the non- professional to help God. That is why the Greek world honored the herald because "he delivered the message as it had been delivered to him." However, Jesus fired the DOCTORS OF THE LAW because they "take away the key to knowledge" by presuming superior authority. That is why they are identified as PARASITES.

rhythmice- , e-s, f., = rhuthmikê, sc. technê, the art of observing rhythm: rhythmice est ars omnis in numeris, Mart. Cap. 9, § 969 .

musica , ae, and mu-si(ce- , e-s, f., = mousikê, the art of music, music; acc. to the notions of the ancients, also every higher kind of artistic or scientific culture or pursuit: musicam Damone aut Aristoxeno tractante? etc., Cic. de Or. 3, 33, 132 : socci et cothurni,i. e. comic and dramatic poetry, Aus. Ep. 10, 43 : musice antiquis temporibus tantum venerationis habuit, ut, Quint. 1, 10, 9

Exêgêtikos , ê, on, of or for narrative, Diom. p.428K.: Comp. Adv. -ôteron Antig.Mir.60 .

2. explanatory, Hermog.Id.1.6, Alex. Aphr. in Metaph.358.13, S.E. M.9.132, etc. Adv. -kôs ib.7.28. 
II. exêgêtika (sc. biblia), ta, title of work on religious rites by Anticlides, Plu.Nic.23: -kon, to, work by Timosthenes, Sch.A.R.3.847
Similar meaning:
 
Exe-ge-tice , es, f., = exêgêtikê, the art of interpretation, exegesis, Diom. 2, p. 421 P.
 
Magice- , e-s, f., = magikê (sc. technê), the magic art, magic, sorcery (post-Aug.): pariter utrasque artes effloruisse, medicinam [p. 1097] dico magicenque, Plin. 30, 1, 2, § 10; 30, 1, 2, § 7: magices factio, id. 30, 1, 2, § 11 .
 
Factio , o-nis, f. [id.] II. (Acc. to facio, II. B.; lit., a taking part or siding with any one; hence concr.) A company of persons associated or acting together, a class, order, sect, faction, party (syn.: pars, partes, causa, rebellio, perduellio, seditio).

Exêgêsis [from exêgeomai]

I. a statement, narrative, Thuc.
II.
explanation, interpretation, Plat.

Hermên-euma , atos, to, interpretation, explanation, in pl., E.Ph.470, HF1137, Ph.2.300.

symbol, monument, Nêrêidos gamôn E.Andr.46 .

Epithesis , eôs, hê, setting on its base, tou andriantos

laying or putting on, application
application of epithets, tas e. poieisthai Arist.Rh.1405b22 .
imposition of increased burdens, Cat.Cod.Astr.7.134
setting upon, attack, Antipho 2.2.13; This was imposing an extra tax when the nation was NOT at war.

Primarily because of advertising and ritualistic religion the world suffers and is oppressed and burdened down by spiritual anxiety. However, it is a mark of a Christian not to jump around trying to find or connect with God. A Christian does not get excited about programs dedicated to the body because he has the "peace" of Jesus. He or she does not travel from sea to sea looking for some magical scheme which will force the body of Christ to grow at our speed.

These anxiety-driven and anxiety-producing programs and "worship" rituals are sure signs that they have not yet "turned to the Lord." Paul gives us permission -- on our own - to:

Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! (be calm) Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near. Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace (quietness, rest) of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. Philippians 4:4-7

Performance worship is a primary proof that we have not allowed Jesus to remove the burden from our lives:

-


At that time Jesus answered and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise (sophos) and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes. Matt 11:25

The sOPHISts are the OPHIS or serpents, soothsayers and musicians of Revelatio. The prudent are those who seek spiritual truth from their own wiseheart. Hid means to conceal. Peter promised A holy spirit only at baptism in Acts 2:38 and A pure conscience or consiousness in 1 Peter 3:21.

Even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight. Matt 11: 26

God the Father in Christ delivered the Spirit word to Jesus the Son. Because God abandoned even the Majesty and Glory of full deity and laid them aside, as it were, on His throne. That means that those who SEEK to know God on their own will AUTOMATICALLY refuse to listen to the Suffering Servant.

God in Christ

All things are delivered unto me of my Father: and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son will reveal him. Matt 11: 27

Paul finally grasped that to reveal Christ one had to take on the role of suffering servant and "know" Christ. He then
 
The Holy Spirit is to God what our spirit is to us and
The Holy Spirit is the Mind of Christ
 
But God hath revealed them unto us by his Spirit: for the Spirit searcheth all things, yea, the deep things of God. 1 Cor 2:10
 
For what man (singular) knoweth the things of a man,
........... save the spirit of man which is in him?
 
even so the things of God knoweth no man,
........... but the Spirit of God. 1 Cor 2:11
 
Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of God; that we might know the things that are freely given to us of God. 1 Cor 2:12
 
For who hath known the mind of the Lord, that he may instruct him?
........... But we have the mind of Christ. 1 Cor 2:16

Therefore, by removing all priestly classes Jesus invites us to "come boldly before the throne of grace"

Come unto me all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Matt 11: 28

Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. Matt 11: 29

Zugos (g2218) dzoo-gos'; from the root of zeugnumi , (to join, espec. by a "yoke"); a coupling, i.e. (fig.) servitude (a law or obligation); also (lit.) the beam of the balance (as connecting the scales): - pair of balances, yoke

For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. Matt 11: 30

Clement Stromata: For he confesses that he is not worthy to baptize so great a Power; for it behooves those, who purify others, to free the soul from the body and its sins, as the foot from the thong.

Perhaps also this signified the final exertion of the Saviour's power toward us-the immediate, I mean-that by His presence, concealed in the enigma of prophecy, in as much as he, by pointing out to sight Him that had been prophesied of, and indicating the Presence which had come, walking forth into the light, loosed the latchet of the oracles of the [old] economy, by unveiling the meaning of the symbols.

And the observances practised by the Romans in the case of wills have a place here; those balances and small coins to denote justice, and freeing of slaves, and rubbing of the ears. For these observances are, that things may be transacted with justice; and those for the dispensing of honour; and the last, that he who happens to be near, as if a burden were imposed on him, should stand and hear and take the post of mediator.

Music and The Burden of Spiritual Anxiety

The first explicit mention of musical instruments in the Bible relates to the "Children of Cain" who used the magical, soothsaying or enchanting methods like those of Babylonia reads:

And his brothers name was Jubal: he was the father of all such as handle the harp and organ. Genesis 4:21

Like his ancestor, Cain, and his inventor of polygamy father Lamech, Jubal handled musical instruments without authority:

Taphas (h8610) taw-fas'; a prim. root; to manipulate, i. e. seize; chiefly to capture, wield; spec. to overlay; fig. to use unwarrantably: - catch, handle, (lay, take) hold (on, over), stop, surely, surprise, take.

Jubal or Genun in most early traditions is said to have been indwelled by Satan while still a youth. He was taught how to invent and play musical instruments and organize mix-sex choirs. The purpose was to seduce the holy Sethites into their "worship." From this early literature it is clear that the power of music is sexual power or authority.

The word which came to stand for hell itself or eternal burning "where the worm dieth not" is related to the tambourines and other musical instruments:

Topheth (h8611) to'-feth; from the base of 8608; a smiting, i. e. (fig.) contempt: - tabret. (stands for the king's music grove which became the place of burning children to the sound of musical instruments)

Taphaph (h8608) taw-faf'; a prim. root; to drum, i. e. play (as) on the tambourine: - taber, play with timbrels.

And Huzzab shall be led away captive, she shall be brought up, and her maids shall lead her as with the voice of doves, tabering upon their breasts. Na.2:7

A similar word defines the musical Levites organized by king David and "the commanders of the army."

Nagas (h5065) naw-gas'; a prim. root; to drive (an animal, a workman, a debtor, an army); by impl. to tax, harass, tyrannize: - distress, driver, exact (-or), oppress (-or), * raiser of taxes, taskmaster.

You may doubt that. However, when Solomon built the temple by selling Israelite cities into slavery trading them for cedar he also used slave labor and drove them with the musical Levites:

-


And the men did the work faithfully: and the overseers of them were Jahath and Obadiah, the Levites, of the sons of Merari; and Zechariah and Meshullam, of the sons of the Kohathites, to set it forward; and other of the Levites, all that could skill of instruments of musick. 2 Chron 34:12
Also they were over the bearers of burdens, and were overseers of all that wrought the work in any manner of service: and of the Levites there were scribes, and officers, and porters. 2 Chr 34:13
 
Service is not a pleasant "worship" service:
 
Abodah (h5656) ab-o-daw'; or abowdah ab-o-daw'; from 5647; work of any kind: - act, bondage, / bondservant, effect, labour, ministering (-try), office, service (-ile, -itude), tillage, use, work, * wrought
 
Abad (h5647) aw-bad'; a prim. root; to work (in any sense); by impl. to serve, till, (caus.) enslave, etc.: - * be, keep in bondage, be bondmen, bond-service, compel, do, dress, ear, execute, / husbandman, keep, labour (-ing man), bring to pass, (cause to, make to) serve (-ing, self), (be, become) servant (-s), do (use) service, till (-er), transgress [from margin], (set a) work, be wrought, worshipper.
 
A sound-alike word is: Abaddown (h11) ab-ad-done'; intens. from 6; abstr. a perishing; concr. Hades: - destruction.
 
We know that Apollo (Abaddon, Apollyon) unleashes the LOCUSTS who are the muses released from Sheol.
 
Nacach (g5329) naw-tsakh'; a prim. root; prop. to glitter from afar, i. e. to be eminent (as a superintendent, espec. of the Temple services and its music); also (as denom. from 5331), to be permanent: - excel, chief musician (singer), oversee (-r), set forward.
 
"Among the Temple prophets officiating in liturgies were the Levitical guilds and singers: the "sons" of Asaph, Heman, Jeduthun, who are said to "prophesy with lyres, with harps, and with cymbals" (I Chronicles). Britannica Members
 
Acaph (h623) aw-sawf'; from 622; collector; Asaph, the name of three Isr., and of the family of the first: - Asaph.
 
Acaph (h622) aw-saf'; a prim. root; to gather for any purpose; hence to receive, take away, i. e. remove (destroy, leave behind, put up, restore, etc.): - assemble, bring, consume, destroy, fetch, gather (in, together, up again), * generally, get (him), lose, put all together, receive, recover [another from leprosy], (be) rereward, * surely, take (away, into, up), * utterly, withdraw.
 
When David ran for his life he tried to get help from Achish the king of GATH. Achish threw up the lying, boast song of the women serving the returning warriors and asked:
 
And the servants of Achish said unto him, Is not this David the king of the land? did they not sing one to another of him in dances, saying, Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands? 1 Samuel 21:11
 
And David laid up these words in his heart, and was sore afraid of Achish the king of Gath. 1 Samuel 21:12
 
And he changed his behaviour before them, and feigned himself mad in their hands, and scrabbled on the doors of the gate, and let his spittle fall down upon his beard. 1 Samuel 21:13
 
Feiging himself MAD was a form of PRAISE:
 
Halal (h1984) haw-lal'; a prim. root; to be clear originally of sound, but usually of color; to shine; hence to make a show, to boast; and thus to be clamorously foolish; to rave; causat. to celebrate; also to stultify: - (make) boast (self), celebrate, commend, (deal, make), fool (- ish, -ly), glory, give [light], be (make, feign self) mad (against), give in marriage, [sing, be worthy of] praise, rage, renowned, shine.
 
Heylel (h1966) hay-lale'; from 1984 (in the sense of brightness); the morning-star: - lucifer.
 
Then said Achish unto his servants, Lo, ye see the man is mad: wherefore then have ye brought him to me? 1 Samuel 21:14
 
Have I need of mad men, that ye have brought this fellow to play the mad man in my presence? shall this fellow come into my house? 1 Samuel 21:15
 
Mad is:
 
Shaga (h7696) shaw-gah'; a prim. root; to rave through insanity: - (be, play the) mad (man).
 
The Lord hath made thee priest in the stead of Jehoiada the priest, that ye should be officers in the house of the Lord,
 
for every man that is mad, and maketh himself a prophet, that thou shouldest put him in prison, and in the stocks. Jer 29:26
 
Shaga (h7696) shaw-gah'; a prim. root; to rave through insanity: - (be, play the) mad (man).
 
The days of visitation are come, the days of recompence are come; Israel shall know it: the prophet is a fool, the spiritual man is mad, for the multitude of thine iniquity, and the great hatred. Ho 9:7

Naba (g5012) naw-baw'; a prim. root; to prophesy, i. e. speak (or sing) by inspiration (in prediction or simple discourse): - prophesy (- ing), make self of prophet.
Later, when most of the kings made the temple into a "like the nations temple" with music and idolatry Isaiah warned:

As for my people, children are their oppressors, and women rule over them. O my people, they which lead thee cause thee to err, and destroy the way of thy paths. Isa 3:12

Therefore, Isaiah prophesied of Jesus by saying:

-


He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth. Is.53:7
Oppressed is from the Hebrew:
 
Nagas (h5065) naw-gas'; a prim. root; to drive (an animal, a workman, a debtor, an army); by impl. to tax, harass, tyrannize: - distress, driver, exact (-or), oppress (-or), * raiser of taxes, taskmaster.
 
The burden Jesus died to remove was:
 
Phortizo (h5412) for-tid'-zo; from 5414; to load up (prop. as aa vessel or animal), i.e. (fig.) to overburden with ceremony (or spiritual anxiety): - lade, be heavy laden.
 
Phoros (h5411) for'-os; from 5342; a load (as borne,) i.e. (fig.) a tax (prop. an individ. assessment on persons or property; whereas 5056 is usually a gen. toll on goods or travel): - tribute.
 
Naga (h5060) naw-gah'; a prim. root; prop. to touch, i. e. lay the hand upon (for any purpose; euphem., to lie with a woman); by impl. to reach (fig. to arrive, acquire); violently, to strike (punish, defeat, destroy, etc.): - beat, (* be able to) bring (down), cast, come (nigh), draw near (nigh), get up, happen, join, near, plague, reach (up), smite, strike, touch.
 
Nagan (h5059) naw-gan'; a prim. root; prop. to thrum, i. e. beat a tune with the fingers; espec. to play on a stringed instrument; hence (gen.) to make music: - player on instruments, sing to the stringed instruments, melody, ministrel, play (-er, -ing..
 
Afflicted is from the Hebrew:
 
Anah (h6031) aw-naw'; a prim. root [possibly rather ident. with 6030 through the idea of looking down or browbeating]; to depress lit. or fig., trans. or intrans. (in various applications, as follow): - abase self, afflict (-ion, self), answer [by mistake for 6030], chasten self, deal hardly with, defile, exercise, force, gentleness, humble (self), hurt, ravish, sing [by mistake for 6030], speak [by mistake for 6030], submit self, weaken, * in any wise.
 
Anah (h6030) aw-naw'; a prim. root; prop. to eye or (gen.) to heed, i. e. pay attention; by impl. to respond; by extens. to begin to speak; spec. to sing, shout, testify, announce: - give account, afflict [by mistake for 6030], (cause to, give) answer, bring low [by mistake for 6030], cry, hear, Leannoth, lift up, say, * scholar, (give a) shout, sing (together by course), speak, testify, utter, (bear) witness. See also 1042, 1043.
We know that Jesus condemned the Jewish clergy as musical children playing their instruments and trying to force him to bow to them by dancing the choral dance and singing the song devoted to Dionysus or Bacchus. They "mocked" Him as they oppressed Him all of the way to the cross.

These people thought that they could induce an artificial oppression and force God to "take knowledge" that they had moved themselves into His presence. This was the common complaint of the ancient clergy as they asked God:

-


Wherefore have we fasted, say they, and thou seest not? wherefore have we afflicted our soul, and thou takest no knowledge? Behold, in the day of your fast ye find pleasure, and exact all your labours. Is.58:3
Nagas (h5065) naw-gas'; a prim. root; to drive (an animal, a workman, a debtor, an army); by impl. to tax, harass, tyrannize: - distress, driver, exact (-or), oppress (-or), * raiser of taxes, taskmaster.
 
Nagash (h5066) -gash'; a prim. root; to be or come (causat. bring) near (for any purpose);
 
euphem. to lie with a woman; as an enemy, to attack; relig. to worship; causat. to present; fig. to adduce an argument; by reversal, to stand back: - (make to) approach (nigh), bring (forth, hither, near), (cause to) come (hither, near, nigh)

The Greek Cantus shows that MUSIC is used to induce PANIC which is sold as "spiritual" by modern pseudo-scholars:

Cantus , u-s, m. [id.] , the production of melodious sound, a musical utterance or expression, either with voice or instrument; hence, song, singing, playing, music (while carmen is prop. the contents or substance of the song, etc.; cf.: qui enim cantus moderata- oratione dulcior invenire potest? Quod carmen artificiosa- conclusione aptius? Cic. de Or. 2, 8, 34 ).

2. With instruments, a playing, music: in nervorum vocumque cantibus, Cic. Tusc. 1, 2, 4 ; id. Rosc. Am. 46, 134: citharae, Hor. C. 3, 1, 20 : horribili stridebat tibia cantu, Cat. 64, 264: Querulae tibiae, Of an actor: tardiores tibicinis modos et cantus remissiores facere, Cic. de Or. 1, 60, 254 .--

Queruus , a, um, adj. [queror] .
 
I. Lit., full of complaints, complaining, querulous (mostly poet.; not in Cic.): (senex) difficilis, querulus, laudator temporis acti, Hor. A. P. 173 : ululatus, Ov. H. 5, 73 : dolor, id. Tr. 3, 8, 32 : vox, id. A. A. 2, 308 : fastus, Mart. 12, 75, 7 : calamitas, Curt. 5, 5, 12 : libelli rusticorum, Plin. Ep. 9, 15, 1 : nec querulus essem, id. Pan. 4, 9, 21 .--
 
II. Poet., transf., of animals and things, softly complaining, uttering a plaintive sound, murmuring, cooing, warbling, chirping, etc.: querulae cicadae, Verg. G. 3, 328 ; cf.: nidus volucrum, Ov. Med. Fac. 77 : rana, Col. 10, 12 : capella, Mart. 7, 31, 3 : fetus suis, Petr. 133 : chorda, Ov. Am. 2, 4, 27 : tibia, Hor. C. 3, 7, 30 : tuba, Prop. 4 (5), 3, 20.
 
Capella is a SHE GOAT
 
Cicadae are the Locusts or Muses of Apollo.
 
Horribilis horri(bi(lis , e, adj. [horreo] , terrible, fearful, dreadful, horrible (freq. and class.).
 
Spectacuum (contr. specta-clum , Prop. 4 (5), 8, 21 and 56), i, n. [specto], a show, sight, spectacle (class.).
Of course, God through Isaiah and Ezekiel told them why they could not find Him even when He was at arm's reach. This is true because you cannot hear God with the mouth wide open.

Wherefore the Lord said, Forasmuch as this people draw near me with their mouth, and with their lips do honour me, but have removed their heart far from me, and their fear toward me is taught by the precept of men: Is.29:13

And Ezekiel connected the mouth devotion with music to the sexual impulse in all ancient religions of the senses. Ezekiel could not expect any better treatement at the sense worshipers than they tried to push onto God. Therefore, He told Ezekiel that:

My people come to you, as they usually do,
and sit before you to listen to your words,
but they do not put them into practice.
With their mouths they express devotion,
but their hearts are greedy for unjust gain. Ezek 33:31
 
Indeed, to them you are nothing more than one who sings love (amorous) songs
with a beautiful voice
and plays an instrument well,
for they hear your words
but do not put them into practice. Ezek 33:32

The roots of musical performance and musical instruments run so deeply into paganism that one "pastor" agrees that they were all originally "the devil's instruments" but God saw their advantage and allowed them! For instance, as the Jews would go into Babylonian Captivity we are introduced to another musical instrument which also has bitter Hebrew roots.

That at what time ye hear the sound of the cornet, flute, harp, sackbut, psaltery, dulcimer, and all kinds of musick, ye fall down and worship the golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the king hath set up: Daniel 3:5

Dachavah (h1761) dakh-av-aw'; from the equiv. of 1760; prob. a musical instrument (as being struck): - instrument of music.

Then the king went to his palace, and passed the night fasting: neither were instruments of musick brought before him: and his sleep went from him. Daniel 6:18

Consistent with all musical terms in the Bible, this instrument was named after its power to force people into slavery. The instrument is derived from:

Dachah (h1760) daw-khaw'; or dachach (Jer. 23:12), daw-khakh'; a prim. root; to push down: - chase, drive away (on), overthrow, outcast, * sore, thrust, totter

We understand both the instrument and its intended use from Jeremiah who wrote:

Wherefore their way shall be unto them as slippery ways in the darkness: they shall be driven on, and fall therein: for I will bring evil upon them, even the year of their visitation, saith the Lord. Je.23:12

The music made was "melody" derived from Zamar but then melody in Greek means "to grind to a powder." When the Jews were forced to worship in Babylon we quote again:

That at what time ye hear the sound of the cornet, flute, harp, sackbut, psaltery, dulcimer, and all kinds of musick, ye fall down and worship the golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the king hath set up: Daniel 3:5

However, God was going to come and rescue the outcasts and downcasts:

And he shall set up an ensign for the nations, and shall assemble the outcasts of Israel, and gather together the dispersed of Judah from the four corners of the earth. Is.11:12

The Lord God, which gathereth the outcasts of Israel saith, Yet will I gather others to him, beside those that are gathered unto him. Is.56:8

Of God, Isaiah wrote--

He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities. Is.53:11

In addition to loading the people of God down with their own burdens, Jesus pronounced:

Woe unto you, lawyers for ye have taken away the key of knowledge: ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered. Luke11:52

When Jesus came He was assaulted by the musical "game-playing" children who wanted Him to grieve and lament to prove that they had defeated him or triumphed over him. Of the poor, oppressed lambs "laden" down by the nomos or doctors of the law, Jesus delivered a primary bit of good news of the gospel is that Christ takes away the burdens laden on the backs of people used by the clergy as pack animals.

Come unto me all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28
Take my yoke upon you, and
learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. Matthew 11:29
For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. Matthew 11:30

And he said, Woe unto you also, ye lawyers for ye lade men with burdens grievous to be borne, and ye yourselves touch not the burdens with one of your fingers. Lu.11:46

Labor is:

Kopiao (g2872) kop-ee-ah'-o; from a der. of 2873; to feel fatigue; by impl. to work hard: - (bestow) labour, toil, be wearied.

Kopos (g2873) kop'-os; from 2875; a cut, i.e. (by anal.) toil (as reducing the strength), lit. or fig.; by impl. pains: - labour, / trouble, weariness.

Kopria (g2874) kop-ree'-ah; from kopros , (ordure; perh. akin to 2875); manure: - dung (-hill)

Kopto (g2875) kop'-to; a prim. verb; to "chop"; spec. to beat the breast in grief: - cut down, lament, mourn, (be-) wail. Comp. the base of 5114.

That is why Jesus CAST OUT the musical minstrels using a word meaning "like dung."

The Lawyers fed the law: All pagan law connected to APOLLO (Apollyon) and the MUSES who are the "locusts" in Revelation 18. He calls all of the religious performers SORCERERS. The MUSIC is the MARK that God has removed the CANDLES.

-


MUSIC AND THE LAWS OF SATAN.

Nomos (g3551) nom'-os; to parcel out, especially food or grazing to animals; law through the idea of prescriptive usage, regulation of law or Gospel...

Nomos , ho, ( [nemô] ) can mean "the Law of God" without respect to MOSES.

A. that which is in habitual practice, use or possession, not in Hom. (cf. J.Ap.2.15), though read by Zenod. in Od.1.3.
I. usage, custom, [
Mousai] melpontai pantôn te nomous kai êthea kedna Hes.Th.66n. archaios aristos

The Words: Mousai melpontai mean

Mousa 1 [*maô]

I. the Muse, in pl. the Muses, goddesses of song, music, poetry, dancing, the drama, and all fine arts, Hom.: the names of the nine were Clio, Euterpe, Thalia, Melpomene, Terpsichore, Erato, Polymnia or Polyhymnia, Urania, and Calliope, Hes.,

II. mousa, as appellat., music, song, Pind., Trag.:--also eloquence, Eur.:--in pl. arts, accomplishments, Ar., Plat.

And the prophets shall become wind (spirit), and the word is not in them: thus shall it be done unto them Jeremiah 5:13
 
Word is: Daber (h1699) do'-ber; from 1696 (in its original sense); a pasture (from its arrangement of the flock): - fold, manner.
 
Woe unto them that rise up early in the morning, that they may follow strong drink; that continue until night, till wine inflame them Isaiah 5:11
 
And the harp, and the viol, the tabret, and pipe, and wine, are in their feasts: but they regard not the work of the Lord, neither consider the operation of his hands. Isaiah 5:12
 
Therefore my people are gone into captivity, because they have no knowledge: and their honourable men are famished, and their multitude dried up with thirst. Isaiah 5:13
 
Therefore hell hath enlarged herself, and opened her mouth without measure: and their glory, and their multitude, and their pomp, and he that rejoiceth, shall descend into it. Isaiah 5:14
 
And the mean man shall be brought down, and the mighty man shall be humbled, and the eyes of the lofty shall be humbled: Isaiah 5:15
 
But the Lord of hosts shall be exalted in judgment, and God that is holy shall be sanctified in righteousness. Isaiah 5:16
 
Then shall the lambs feed after their manner, and the waste places of the fat ones shall strangers eat. Is.5:17

The Words: Mousai melpontai mean

Melpô to sing or CELEBRATE. This "arousal singing" was always associated with Phoibos who was the BRIGHT ONE who is also Lucifer and Zoe. He competed with the Pythian spirit Paul cast out of the little TRAFFICING girl USED by men.

MUSICAL melody does not include PSALLO used by false religionists to really practice the MELODY associated with the Devil.

II. melody, strain, oida d' ornichôn nomôs pantôn Alcm.67 ; n. hippios Pi.O. 1.101 ; Apollôn hageito pantoiôn n. Id.N.5.25 ; n. polemikoi Th.5.69 ; epêlalaxan Arai ton oxun n. A.Th.952 (lyr.); krektoi n. S.Fr. 463 , cf. AP9.584: metaph., tous Haidou n. S.Fr.861 .

Pindar, Odes 5. The most beautiful chorus of Muses sang gladly for the Aeacids on Mt. Pelion, and among them Apollo, sweeping the seven-tongued lyre with a golden plectrum, [25] led all types of strains. And the Muses began with a prelude to Zeus, then sang first of divine Thetis and of Peleus; how Hippolyte, the opulent daughter of Cretheus, wanted to trap him with deceit

Plêk-tron A. anything to strike with: 1. instrument for striking the lyre, plectrum,

2. esp. a type of early melody created by Terpander for the lyre as an accompaniment to Epic texts, n. orthios Hdt.1.24 ; n. Boiôtios S.Fr.966 ; n. kitharôidikoi Ar.Ra.1282 , cf. Pl.Lg.700d, Arist.Po.1447b26, Pr.918b13, etc.; also for the flute, n. aulôidikos Plu.2.1132d ; without sung text, n. aulêtikos ib.1133d, cf. 138b, Poll.4.79; later, composition including both words and melody, e.g. Tim.Pers.

Rhapso-dus Epic verses were originally sung to musical accompaniment, but after the time of Terpander, as lyric poetry became more independently cultivated, the accompaniment of stringed instruments fell into disuse; and then gradually, instead of a song-like recitation, a simple declamation, in which the rhapsodist held a branch of bay in his hand, came to be generally adopted. This had happened even before the time of Plato and Aristotle (see especially Plato's Ion).

As in earlier times the singers moved from place to place, in order to get a hearing at the courts of princes or before festive gatherings, so the rhapsodists also led an unsettled and wandering life.

At the time of Christ external melody did not include instruments. However, the word had be so defined and Paul defined the MELODY as "striking the heart strings"

The ceremonial legalists -- with music in the above example -- load you down like pack animals. The clearest fact about most complex music which "sounds good" is that it is a drug high created by first creating spiritual anxiety.

Religionists (not Christians) deliberately use music as mind manipulation. However, it is not to get you to bow down to Jesus but to see the musical worship team "at the center" replacing Christ and His Word. Because music is often used to attract "seekers" but sometimes to pay for the new temple, it used musical worship teams which are "authorized" by the Levitical Teams which we noted were to oppress and not to improve the spiritual health of the Jews.

It is an acknowledged fact that "musical worship teams" are needed to "lead you into the presence of God" or connect you with God. This is the clearest proof of spiritual anxiety by the performers who ignore Paul's insistence that "He is not far from all of us." He isn't lost, friends.

The "burden" of Jesus is not being a "pack animal" for the ceremonial legalistic performers but just going along with Jesus and allowing Him to carry the burden which, in Greek, is:

Phortion (g5413) for-tee'-on; dimin. of 5414; an invoice (as part of freight), i.e. (fig.) a task or service: - burden.

The Jewish clergy (who took away the key to knowledge) treated the people like mules and piled on more and more programs and rituals which, science fully knows, just creates endorphins or "morphine-like" drugs and creates spiritual anxiety--"do this and God will not chastise you and you will prove your worth to the institution." "Don't pick up sticks or psallo the grain on the Sabbath or we will have to have a party at the foot of a Roman cross." The burden Jesus absolutely removed, others want to tie around our necks is the planned anziety which the clergy imposed upon the "worshipers" to force them to conform even if it emotionally damaged them.

Does loud preaching or singing work? Certainly, on many. By rousing the group, spiritual anxiety is created and the pagan soothsayer could sell that as "spirituality." It has always been that way.

Many self-doubting sermons and musical worship teams have anxiety as their most important product. That is why they come out. However, this is a violation of a direct command of Jesus and repeated by Paul:

Take therefore no thought (do not be anxious) for the morrow: for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself. Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof. Mt.6:34

Religionists feel that to justify ungodly gain they must make you anxious or you will not GIVE and you will not ATTEND. The whole structure of preaching and music is the burden which is "spiritual anxiety created by religious ritual."

Jesus didn't tell people not to do the impossible. We all worry. However, He demanded that we not be overly concerned over those things beyond our control:

And he said unto his disciples, Therefore I say unto you,
........... Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat; neither for the body, what ye shall put on. Lk 12:22
........... The life is more than meat, and the body is more than raiment. Lk12:23

Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God. Ph.4:6

While it may sound "spiritual," science knows fully well that that music is effective by creating endorphins or morphine-like drugs. After a short period (very short for some of us) the grating, abrading nature of "show and tell" begins to short-circuit our nerve-endings and we feel like fleeing--but the low bass or the "booming" nails our feet to the floor in appeasement. Later, that which seemed so spiritual (like LSD), turns and rends the people and "your assemblies do more harm than good" (1Cor 11:17).

However, Jesus said that if we are not willing to leave the war-like rituals of family and city and follow Him "outside the gate" then we will just have to continue to be some rabbi's pack mule. When we give it up and follow Him, He removes this burden and "church" will be quiet, peaceful and no one will "lay a guilt trip" on you and then fail to lift the burden.

Because he knows that he is assualting God's people "able to instruct one another" he is forced to feed them fermenting wine (song or sermon) from his now-open wineskin:

For the earth shall be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea. Hab 2:14

Woe unto him that giveth his neighbour drink, that puttest thy bottle to him, and makest him drunken also, that thou mayest look on their nakedness Hab 2:15

Thou art filled with shame for glory: drink thou also, and let thy foreskin be uncovered: the cup of the Lords right hand shall be turned unto thee, and shameful spewing shall be on thy glory. Hab 2:16

The loud speaker or singer believes that his self-induced hypnotic trance is enthusiasm and he believes that this means that god is within. He doesn't even know that Philo coined this word to describe those afflicted, as in Corinth, with enthus o mania - just momentary insanity.

Plato Cratylus had Socrates saying:

euphrosune is named as every one may see,
from the
soul moving (pheresthai) in harmony with nature;

Epithumia is really e epi ton thumon iousa dunamis, the power which enters into the soul; thumos (passion) is called from the rushing (thuseos) and boiling of the soul; imeros (desire) denotes the stream (rous) which most draws the soul dia ten esin tes roes- because flowing with desire (iemenos), and expresses a longing after things and violent attraction of the soul to them, and is termed imeros from possessing this power;

Pothos (longing) is expressive of the desire of that which is not present but absent, and in another place (pou); this is the reason why the name pothos is applied to things absent, as imeros is to things present; eros (love) is so called because flowing in (esron) from without; the stream is not inherent, but is an influence introduced through the eyes, and from flowing in was called esros (influx) in the old time when they used o (short) for o (long), and is called eros, now that o (long) is substituted for o (short). But why do you not give me another word?

Her. What do you think of doxa (opinion), and that class of words?

Soc. Doxa is either derived from dioxis (pursuit), and expresses the march of the soul in the pursuit of knowledge,

or from the shooting of a bow (toxon); the latter is more likely, and is confirmed by oiesis (thinking), which is only oisis (moving), and implies the movement of the soul to the essential nature of each thing-

just as boule (counsel) has to do with shooting (bole);

and boulesthai (to wish) combines the notion of aiming and deliberating- all these words seem to follow doxa, and all involve the idea of shooting,

just as aboulia, absence of counsel, on the other hand, is a mishap, or missing, or mistaking of the mark, or aim, or proposal, or object.

Loud music from living or dead idols, often musical instruments, was sold to the fools as the voice of the gods or demons. However, God warned:

What profiteth the graven image that the maker thereof hath graven it; the molten image, and a teacher of lies, that the maker of his work trusteth therein, to make dumb idols? Hab 2:18

Woe unto him that saith to the wood, Awake; to the dumb stone, Arise, it shall teach Behold, it is laid over with gold and silver, and there is no breath at all in the midst of it. Hab 2:19

But the Lord is in his holy temple: let all the earth keep silence before him. Hab.2:20

What Jesus has to give is rest, freedom from spiritual anxiety of religious ceremonies--

Anapausis (g372) an-ap'-ow-sis; from 373; intermission; by impl. recreation: - rest.

Anapauo (g373) an-up-ow'-o; from 303 and 3973; (reflex.) to repose (lit. or fig. [be exempt], remain); by impl. to refresh: - take ease, refresh, (give, take) rest.

Jesus did His praying (even hymning to Himself) in quiet places. This word is made up of two parts:

To "take your peace," or "come apart from the milling crowd and smell the roses." After all, the new disciples are "outside the gates" and walled off from the rituals.

Pauo (g3973) pow'-o; a prim. verb ("pause"); to stop (trans. or intrans.), i.e. restrain, quit, desist, come to an end: - cease, leave, refrain.

If anxiety--real or artificially created by music and noise--is our concern then we truly fret over our salvation. There is, throughout Scripture and ancient writings, an insecure feeling which only music could soothe. It could first soothe Saul and then drive him into raving "prophesying" as a sign of judgment that he had no interest in God's Word.

Our burden is just the ship's bill of lading. It certifies that Jesus Christ has taken the burden of religious ritual and ritualizers off our backs and has given us the authority to excise them like a doctor removes a wart.

The Colossians, Ephesians and all of the churches had a rabble of men trading slavery for food. They wanted to drag the people back under the bondage or burdens of religious rituals, usually with music. The message in Corinthians 11-14 makes this clear to open eyes.

To counteract all of the clergy-induced burden, Jesus defined worship not to be a time or place but "in spirit" or in the mind or inner person as they devote themselves to truth.

Kenneth Sublett Comments Welcome

Fred Peatross: Clapping and Raising hands.

Heredotus and Hand Clapping: Background to Mount Sinai

Hand Clapping to Replace the Amen: Rubel Shelly

Escaping God's Grace into Legalism: the Musical Burden

 

Christ Died To Give us Rest

Musical Worship Index

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