Wineskins.org.The.Unity.of.the.Spirit

The Jesus Pattern: The Way Which They Call A Sect:  Refuted by: Mat Dabbs, Patrick Mead, Jay Guin, Mark Powell, John Mark Hicks: OF is a preposition: the Spirit OF God is His BREATH.

Jesus Christ as HOLY SPIRIT breathed on Paul to denounce and REJECT what He called the Scribes and Pharisees: rhetoricians for hire, singers or instrument players.  Religious Craftsmen called Parasites: speakers, singers or instrument players will be or ARE CAST ALIVE INTO THE LAKE OF FIRE. This was in a Prophetic PATTERN in Isaiah 30.

This unity is that you MUST take the MARK OF THE BEAST.

-Panourg-os (properisp.), on,
A. ready to do anything, wicked, knavish,
II. in a less positively bad sense, cunning, clever, smart, “p. kai deinosD. 1.3, cf. Pl.Tht.177a, Arist.EN1144a28; “p. te kai sophosPl.R.409c; “kompsos kai p.Plu. 2.28a: Sup., Plb.5.75.2. Adv. “-gōs, p. kai hupokritikōs legein ta epēAth.9.407a.
-“p. kai deinosegein clever at speaking, forcible, vehement, style in oratory,
d. hupo panourgias

-Plat. Rep. 409c But that cunning fellow quick to suspect evil, and who has himself done many unjust acts and who thinks himself a smart trickster, [panourgos te kai sophos]
        when he associates with his like does appear to be clever,
       
being on his guard and fixing his eyes on the patterns within himself.
        But when the time comes for him to mingle with the good and his elders,

Plat. Rep. 3.409d
then on the contrary he appears stupid. He is unseasonably [kairon] distrustful [apistōn] and
        he cannot recognize a sound character
       
because he has no such pattern in himself.
But since he more often meets with the bad than the good,
        he seems to himself and to others to be rather wise than foolish.” “That is quite true,” he said.
“Well then,” said I, “such a one must not be our ideal of the good and wise judge but the former.
        For while badness could never come to know both virtue and itself, native virtue through education
Plat. Rep. 3.409e will at last acquire the science both of itself and badness.1 This one, then, as I think, is the man who proves to be wise and not the bad man.2” “And I concur,
1 Cf. George Eliot, Adam Bede, chap. xiv.: “It is our habit to say that while the lower nature can never understand the higher, the higher nature commands a complete view of the lower. But I think the higher nature has to learn this comprehension by a good deal of hard experience.”

2 Cf. Theaetetus 176 D “It is far best not to concede to the unjust that they are clever knaves, for they glory in the taunt.” Cf. Unity of Plato's Thought, n. 21.

Sophos , ē, on, A. skilled in any handicraft or art, clever, harmatēlatas s. Pi.P.5.115, cf. N.7.17; “kubernētēsA.Supp.770; “mantisId.Th.382; “oiōnothetasS.OT484 (lyr.); of a sculptor, E.Fr.372; even of hedgers and ditchers, Margites Fr.2; but in this sense mostly of poets and musicians, Pi.O.1.9, P.1.42, 3.113; en kithara s. E.IT1238
etc.; also en oiōnois, kithara, E. IT662, 1238 (lyr.);
God gave the gifted leaders in Ephesians 4 to specificially prevent these deceivers so that the church, ekklesia or School of the Word could be held.







The Seven Ones in Ephesians 4 Denies the Trinity, outlaws all performance rhetoric or music and includes the definition of the Church, ekklesia or in Paul's use, the synagogue which is a school (only) of the Word (only) Gifted founders were eye and ear witnesses to deliver Jesus Christ's message from God the Father.  That is defined as the sole resource or "that which is written for the edification or education of the disciples: a disciple is not a ceremonial worshiper but a student.

Paul says there are sven "things" but he did not say THAT'S ALL: If anyone believes that and continues to collect a wage for teaching anything elde then he is a crimimal.  Ephesians 3 defines the role of the assembly as singular: to make known the manifold wisdom of
God. No one can contribute anything "beyond the sacred pages." In Ephesians 4 Paul will say that Christ has protected His School of the Word by gifted teachers. This is the only way to mark false teachers and "synagogues of Satan."

While the "scholars" missed the prophets, they missed THE Spirit OF Christ prophesying the reign of Christ both inclusively and exclusively.  For instance, the sacrificial system is the pattern for those imposing theatrical and musical performance defined to "makethe lambs dumb before the slaughter." 

Jer 23:16 Thus saith the Lord of hosts,
        Hearken not unto the words of the prophets that prophesy unto you;
        they make you vain:
        they speak a vision of their own heart,
        and not out of the mouth of the Lord.

  Thus saith the Lord, After this manner will I mar the pride of Judah,
        and the great pride of Jerusalem. Jer 13:9
        This evil people, which
refuse to hear my words,
........which walk in the imagination of their heart, [twisted]
........and walk after other gods, to serve them,
........and to worship them, shall even be as this girdle, which is good for nothing. Jer 13:10

> For I spake NOT unto your fathers, nor commanded them
        in the day that I brought them out of the land of Egypt,
       concerning burnt offerings or sacrifices: Jeremiah 7:22
> But this thing commanded I them, saying,
       Obey my voice, and I will be your God, and ye shall be my people:
       and walk ye in all the ways that I have commanded you,
       that it may be well unto you. Jeremiah 7:23

> But they HEARKENED NOT, nor inclined their ear,
       but walked in the counsels and in the imagination of their evil heart,
       and went backward, and not forward. Jeremiah 7:24

Jer 23:17 They say still unto them that despise me,
        The Lord hath said, Ye shall have peace;
        and they say unto every one that walketh
        after the imagination of his own heart,
        No evil shall come upon you.

Despise tthe Word of God:
Blasphēmo , āre, ak profanely of sacred things, “eis theousPl.R.381e; offer rash prayer I.  v.a., = blasphēmeō (eccl. Lat.), to revile, reproach, Vulg. 1 Par. 20, 7; God and divine things, to blaspheme: “Christum,Prud. Apoth. 415: “nomen Domini,Tert. adv. Jud. 13 fin.; Vulg. Lev. 24, 11; id. Matt. 9. 3; 26, 65.
2. speak ill or to the prejudice of one, slander, “peri tēs emēs diatribēs

H5006 nâ’ats naw-ats' A primitive root; to scorn; or (Ecclesiastes 12:5 ) by interchange for H5132 , to bloom:—abhor, (give occasion to) blaspheme, contemn, despise, flourish, X great, provoke.

h5006.Naats.Blaspheme.gif

Ecclesiastes 12:4And the doors shall be shut in the streets, when the sound of the grinding is low, and he shall rise up at the voice of the bird, and all the daughters of music shall be brought low;
Ecclesiastes 12:5Also when they shall be afraid of that which is high, and fears shall be in the way, and the almond tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail: because man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets:
Christ the Rock defined the qahal, synagogue or Church of Christ in the wilderness. This was:

INCLUSIVE of Rest, Reading and Rehearsing the Word of God.
Exodus 18 defines the small groups ordained to teach The Book of the Covenant before the people fell into musical idolatry at Mount Sinai.

EXCLUSIVE of vocal or instrumental rejoicing including high-sounding rhetoric.

Jesus as the Mesiah speaking Spirit without meter, approved the Synagogue where the pattern was to stand up to read and then sit down decently and in order.

PAUL AND PETER EXCLUDE THE PREVAILING PAGAN RITUALS BEFORE THEY DEFINE THE CHURCH.


Eph. 4:1 I therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called,
2564. kaleo, kal-eh´-o; akin to the base of 2753; to “call” (properly, aloud, but used in a variety of applications, directly or otherwise): — bid, call (forth), (whose, whose sur-)name (was (called)).
2753. keleuo, kel-yoo´-o; from a primary ke÷llw kello (to urge on); “hail”; to incite by word, i.e. order: — bid, (at, give) command(-ment).
Eph. 4:2 With all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, forbearing one another in love;

There is no upper Case "S"pirit in the text.  It is not the Holy Spirit.  The context is not a complex godhead but the spirit or mind which unites all of the members of a congregation toward one goal. Paul defines the "synagogue" in Romans 15 to exclude the pagan sects identified by their diet in the marketplace.  He excludes all that does not edify which here means to educate "with that which is written for our learning."

Eph. 4:3 Endeavouring to keep the unity of the spirit in the bond of peace.

The Church of Christ is the Body of Christ, therefore, the "spirit" is the spirit OF unity within that body.  Body and spirit are alalogs of the human bod.  If a human body has two "spirits" or minds driving it it cannot accomplish the sole purpose from Ephesians three which is to make known the manifest wisdom of God to the "principalities and powers."  This is similar to Job's being God's human agent to withstand the influence of Satan. Paul's purpose is not to make a legal list of seven essentials but to both exclude the world and the wise so that the body can be edified or educated to withstand the very onslaught which drives most of christianism.

Eph. 4:4 There is one body, and one spirit

        even as ye are called in one hope of your calling;


One of the essentials of "unity" narrowly defined by Barton W. Stone is a rejection of any speculation on the various views of the "trinity."  There is only ONE GOD and He is not composed of three family members internal or external.  Paul made it clear that there are only TWO "actors." The One God made Himself fully known is Jesus of Nazareth and it is Jesus as the Chrit with Whom we have to do in all that we do.

Eph. 4:5 One Lord, one faith, one baptism,
Acts 10:37 That word, I say, ye know, which was published throughout all Judaea,
        and began from Galilee, after the baptism which John preached;
Acts 10:38 How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost and with power:
        who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil;
        for God was with him.

John 14:10 Believest thou not that I am IN the Father,
        and the Father IN me?
        the words that I speak unto you I speak not of myself:
        but the Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works.
John 14:11 Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me:
        or else believe me for the very works’ sake.

1Cor. 1:3 Grace be unto you, and peace,
        from God our Father,
        and from the Lord Jesus Christ.  

1Cor. 8:5 For though there be that are called gods, whether in heaven or in earth,
        (as there be gods many, and lords many,)
1Cor. 8:6 But to us
        there is but ONE GOD, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him;
        and ONE LORD Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him

Gal. 1:1 Paul, an apostle, (not of men, neither by man,
        but by Jesus Christ,
        and God the Father,
        who raised him from the dead;)
Gal. 1:3 Grace be to you and peace
        from God the Father,
        and from our Lord Jesus Christ,
And there is only One invisible, incomprehensible Deity and no man knows the Father unless the Son makes Him known. Therefore, there can be no unity when people dismiss the Words of Christ as Spirit and Life and impose their own opinion. The 7 Ones EXCLUDES diversities;

Eph. 4:6 One God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all.

This is the One GOD and One LORD in the address of all of the Epistles.  The Holy Spirit whose name is Jesus Christ the Righteous because it is the Spirit OF Christ does not appear as a person. Therefore, based on all clasically trinitarians and the inventors of the term none of them would be in "unity" with anyone who taught that  God (singular term) is really three equal centers of consciousness with their own emotions and plans.  You would be lucky if they burned you with wet wood so you smothered before you fried.

Eph. 4:7 But unto every one of us is given grace according to the measure of the gift of Christ.
Titus 2:11 For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men,
Titus 2:12 Teaching us that,
        denying ungodliness and worldly lusts,
        we should live soberly, righteously, and godly,
        in this present world;
kosm-ikos , ē, on, (kosmos IV) s.v. Orpheus: Astrol., k. kentra skhēma 
Orpheus , eōs, o(, Dor. Orphēs  Orphēn  
A. Orpheus, Pi.P.4.177, Pl.R.364e, etc.:—Adj. Orpheios , a, on, E.Alc. 969(lyr.), Pl.Lg.829e; or Orphikos , ē, on, Hdt.2.81 ; “en tois O. epesi kaloumenoisArist.de An.410b28.\
Epos , older wepos SIG9 (v. infr.), etc., eos, to (Skt.
A. vácas 'word', 'hymn', cf. eipon):
1. song or lay accompanied by music, 8.91,17.519.
IV. in pl., epic poetry, Opposite. melē (lyric poetry), iambeia, dithuramboi, etc., “rhaptōn epeōn aoidoiPi.N.2.2 ; “ta Kupria epeaHdt.2.117, cf. Th.1.3, X.Mem.1.4.3, Pl.R.379a, etc. ; “epea te poiein pros luran t' aeideinTheoc.Ep.21.6 ; “nikēsas eposIG3.1020 ; poētēs epōn
Skhēma 2. appearance, Opposite. the reality, ouden allo plēn . . s. a mere outside, E.Fr.25, cf. 360.27, Pl.R.365c; show, pretence, “ēn de touto . . s. politikon tou logouTh.8.89; ;
skhēmasi kai khrōmasi mimeisthai
esp. outside show, pomp, to tēs arkhēs s. Pl.Lg.685c;
X.Smp.7.5; en . . mousikē [hēs to kitharizein kai to adein kai to embainein orthōs;]  kai skhēmata . . kai melē enesti figures and tunes, Pl.Lg.655a 10. = to aidoion LXXIs.3.17.
Epithu_m-ia lust of the EYE, lust of the EAR says Barnes of Amos
Titus 2:13 Looking for that blessed hope,
        and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;
Titus 2:14 Who gave himself for us,
        that he might redeem us from all iniquity,
        and purify unto himself a peculiar people,
        zealous of good works.
Jesus will not PRAY for the "world" or KOSMOS which is the concept brought from Babylon by Pythagoras: His sect was one of those SILENCED in Romans 14 if they wanted to attend the open synagogue defined in Romans 15 where SELF-pleasure specificially outlaws all of what Jesus called the Scribes, Pharisees He called Hypocrites: in the Ezekiel 33 version Christ named entertaining speakers, singers and instrument players as PROOF that the speakers were mercinaries and the audience was looking for entertainment--the reason butterflies flock to instrumental churches.

Jesus said that God HIDES Himself (very well, thank you) from the Wise: the Sophists:
Luke 10:21 In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said,
        I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth,
        that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent,
        and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.
1Cor. 1:19 For it is written, I will DESTROY the wisdom of the WISE,
        and will bring to nothing the understanding of the prudent.
1Cor. 1:20 Where is the wise? where is the scribe?
        where is the disputer of this world?
        hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world?
1Cor. 1:21 For after that in the wisdom of God
        the world by wisdom knew not God,
        it pleased God by the foolishness of PREACHING to save them that believe.

1Cor. 3:18 Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you
        seemeth to be wise in this world,
        let him become a fool, that he may be wise.
1Cor. 3:19 For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God.
        For it is written, He taketh the wise in their own craftiness.
1Cor. 3:20 And again, The Lord knoweth the thoughts of the wise, that they are vain.
Matthew 28:19 Go ye therefore, and teach all nations,
        baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:
Matthew 28:20 Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.

Sophis-tês , ou, ho, master of one's craft, adept, expert, of diviners, Hdt.2.49; of poets, meletan sophistais prosbalon Pi.I.5(4).28 , cf. Cratin.2; of musicians, sophistês . . parapaiôn chelun A.Fr.314, cf. Eup.447, Pl.Com. 140; sophistêi Thrêiki (sc. Thamyris) E.Rh.924, cf. Ath.14.632c: with mod

II. from late v B.C., a Sophist, i.e. one who gave lessons in grammar, rhetoric, politics, mathematics, for money, such as Prodicus, Gorgias, Protagoras, a quibbler, cheat,  a RHETORICIAN as the primary meaning of a HYPOCRITE.

hoi s. tōn hierōn melōn” A sophist, serpent, makes MUSICAL MELODY with a congregation AS a harp and cannot grasp that IN THE HEART is a place.

WISDOM IS:  sophia , Ion. -, h(, prop. A. [select] cleverness or skill in handicraft and art, as in carpentry, tektonos, hos rha te pasēs eu eidē s. Il.15.412; of the Telchines, Pi.O.7.53; entekhnos s., of Hephaestus and Athena, Pl.Prt.32 1d; of Daedalus and Palamedes, X.Mem.4.2.33, cf. 1.4.2; in music and singing, tekhnē kai s. h.Merc.483, cf. 511; in poetry,

WISE: Sophos A. skilled in any handicraft or art, clever, harmatēlatas s. Pi.P.5.115, cf. N.7.17; “kubernētēsA.Supp.770; “mantisId.Th.382;

The Mantis were the Mad Women of Corinth: history notes that any male who would sing and play in a religious sense was "drunk, perverted or just mocking."
Plato's Symposium is the "getting drunk on wine" before they sang, or the CROOKED GENERATION.

Aristodemus meeting Socrates smartly attired expresses his surprise at so unusual a circumstance. Socrates explains that being invited to dine with Agathon he feels bound to go “in finery to the fine”; and he presses Aristodemus, although uninvited, to accompany him. On the road Socrates, immersed in thought, lags behind, and Aristodemus arrives at Agathon's alone. Not till they are half-way through the meal does Socrates appear; and Agathon rallies him on his devotion to sophia.
The proposal of Pausanias to restrict the potations, in view of yesterday's banquet, and that of Eryximachus to dismiss the flute-girl and amuse themselves by logoi, are unanimously agreed to. Then Eryximachus propounds an idea of Phaedrus, that Eros is the best possible theme for encomia, and suggests that each of the party in turn, commencing with Phaedrus, should now deliver an encomium on Eros. This suggestion is applauded by Socrates. Of the encomia the most noteworthy were the following:—
OF SOPHIA: Sophia is the mother of ZOE in Gnosticism or EVE.

THE MEANING OF LEGALISM: All religious acts must be performed according to strict rules.

d The varying nomoi concerning Eros may be classified thus:—

(1) In all Greek states except Athens the nomos is simple, either (a) approving paederastia, as in Elis and Boeotia; or (b) condemning it, as in Ionia and states subject to barbarian rule, where it is held to foster a dangerous spirit of independence (e.g. Harmodius and Aristogiton).

ÎThis was the message of Jesus consigning the PIPERS wanting to make sing (Lament) and dance (squirm) under the initiation of Dionysus the old wineskin God in the temple

(2) At Athens the nomos is complex. (a) Eros is approved, and its excesses condoned, when directed towards superior youths approaching manhood. (b) It appears to be condemned, in so far as parents forbid their boys to hold converse with “erastae.” The explanation of this ambiguous attitude must be sought in the principle laid down above, that the moral quality of an act depends upon the conditions of its performance. The Athenian nomos (LEGALISM) provides a test for distinguishing between good and bad forms of Eros: the test of time shows whether or not the right motive (desire for aretē) actuates both the lover and his object. This motive alone justifies all erotic pursuits and surrenders, even mutual deception: hence we conclude that kalon aretēs heneka kharizesthai.

This is the message of GRACE only
kharizō
2. gratify or indulge a humour or passion,
3. in erotic sense, grant favours to a man, Ar.Ec.629 (anap.), Pl.Smp.182a, Phdr.231c, 256a, X.Mem.3.11.12, etc.: hence of Comedy, “oligois kharisasthaiAr.Eq.517 (anap.): c. acc. cogn., “kh. thēleian apolausin

Eph. 4:8 Wherefore he saith, When HE ascended up on high,
        he led captivity captive, and gave gifts unto men.

Jesus died, was resurrected and was transfigured or changed. He returned to God and God gave Him His post-resurrected Spiritual state.  He--Jesus Christ--shed forth what happened by the Holy Spirit in the upper room.
Acts 2:33 Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted,
        and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost,
        he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear.
1Pet. 3:18 For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust,
        that he might bring us to God,
            being put to death in the flesh,
        but quickened by the Spirit:
1Pet. 3:19 By which also he went and preached unto the spirits in prison;
1Pet. 3:20 Which sometime were disobedient,
        when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah,
        while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water.
1Pet. 3:21 The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us
        (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh,
        but the answer of a good conscience toward God,)
        by the resurrection of Jesus Christ:
1Pet. 3:22 Who is gone into heaven, and is on the right hand of God;
        angels and authorities and powers being made subject unto him.  
Eph. 4:9 (Now that he ascended,
        what is it but that he also descended first into the lower parts of the earth?


Paul always DEFINES the pagan (new style singing as a mark of the beast) before he defines the SOLE purpose of the ekklesia or synagogue or school of the Bible which EXCLUDES the marketplace preferences (Romans 15) and INCLUDES the Scriptures to educate, glorify God and keep the unity.

WHAT?

Eph 4:10
He that descended is the same also that ascended up far above all heavens,
        that he might fill all things
.)

When Jesus as the Christ was transfigured or metamorphosed into the spiritual world His name when He appeared to Paul was "Jesus of Nazareth."  Jesus of Nazareth was MADE both lord and Christ and continues to be the earthly intercessor or Arm of God.
Heb. 8:4 For if he were on earth, he should not be a priest, seeing that there are priests that offer gifts according to the law:
To validate and leave an example--written says Peter--Christ gave certain men supernatural help to equip the church with the sole teaching authorized for the church or assembly: disunity always happens when people violate the direct commandment against "doubtful disputations" which means private opinions or even words according to Christ through Isaiah in chapter 58.

Eph 4:11
And he gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists;
        and some, pastors and teachers


God always reveals through specially chosen men whom He has prepared to hear and reveal His will: over and over it was the prophets led by the Spirit of Christ who spoke the spiritual truth in direct opposition to the Scribes who recorded the history of the Civil-Military-Priestly system abandoned to worship the starry host.

Jesus Christ continued to guide certain people to set the church in order: the method chosen was to identify wrong teachings and then correct them.  Peter warns that the MARKS of a false teacher is one who does not teach that which is revealed:
For he received from God the Father HONOR and GLORY,
        when there came such a voice to him from the excellent glory,
        This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. 2 Pet 1:17

What was it to prove?

WE have also a MORE SURE word of PROPHECY;
        whereunto YOU do well that ye take heed,
        as unto a light that shineth in a dark place,
        until the day dawn,
        and the day star [Christ] arise in your hearts: 2 Pet 1:19
In 1 Peter 1:11 Peter said that the PROPHETS spoke through the Spirit OF CHRIST.
Therefore, his command was that our assemblies give heed to the PROPHETS  through whom God delivered SPIRITUAL truth in mortal warfare with the LEGAL animal sacrifices IMPOSED as the curse when God ABANDONED the Monarchy to worship the starry host.

Day Star Christ
Heart seat of the understanding, the faculty and seat of the intelligence

Give heed means worship: Paul's ONLY worship word.
prosecho
to apply one's self to, attach one's self to,
    hold or cleave to a person or a thing
    to be given or addicted to
    to devote thought and effort to

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture
        is of any private interpretation (further expounding). 2 Pet 1:20

You cannot: Epilusis (g1955) ep-il'-oo-sis; from 1956; explanation, i.e. application: - interpretation.
Epiluo (g1956) ep-ee-loo'-o; from 1909 and 3089; to solve further, i.e. (fig.) to explain, decide: - determine, expound.

You cannot: Epi-lusis , eôs, hê,
A. release from, e. phobôn [Fear of Apollo or Apollyon] didou A.Th.134 (lyr.): abs., exemption from banishment, SIG306.51 (Arc., iv B.C.).

You cannot: Exêgêtês II. expounder, interpreter, esp. of oracles, dreams, or omens, Hdt.1.78; at Athens, of sacred rites or customs, modes of burial, expiation, etc., spiritual director, of Apollo, Pl.R.427c. b. at Rome, of the pontifices. Similar: Suristikê (sc. technê), hê, the art of piping: used with rhythmice, histrionia.  Magicus, belonging to magic, magic, magical. superstitiones, vanitates, that were invoked by incantations: linguae= skilled in incantations, cantus, magicae resonant ubi Memnone chordae, mysterious
WHY?

Eph 4:12 For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ:

The Word EDIFY means EDUCATE: Romans 15 says you speak "that which is written" using one MIND and one MOUTH to educate.

Musical performance in religion does not perfect, enable service, does not edify, does not UNIFY, does not give knowledge of the Son of God, does not perfect and does not make one like Christ: Jesus cast the musical minstrels out "like dung."

Musical performance is based on failing to understand that Paul commanded that we SPEAK that which is written to Teach, Comfort, Exhort.  Singing and Melody are the EFFECTS on the spirit or heart as the only place "worship" takes place.

Singing because it is a "commanded act of worship" is rank legalism and PREVENTS the sole role of the ekklesia or synagogue which is to Teach the Word of Christ.

g3619.Edifying.gif g3619.Edifying.gif

1Corinthians 14:3 But he that prophesieth speaketh unto men to edification, and exhortation, and comfort.
1Corinthians 14:4 He that speaketh in an unknown tongue edifieth himself; but he that prophesieth edifieth the church.

2Corinthians 10:8 For though I should boast somewhat more of our authority, which the Lord hath given us for edification, and not for your destruction, I should not be ashamed:

HOW?
Eph 4:13
Till we all come in 
        A. the unity of THE faith, and of
        B. the knowledge of the Son of God,
        C. unto a perfect MAN,
        D. unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ:

Stature: 2244. helikia, hay-lik-ee´-ah; from the same as 2245; maturity (in years or size):  age, stature. [Comrade, not playmate

You cannot go BEYOND THAT WHICH IS WRITTEN: that is a direct command made over and over.  If you go BEYOND that which is written with the SOLE PURPOSE 

Eph. 3:8 Unto me, who am less than the least of all saints, is this grace given, 
        that I should preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ;
Matthew 28:19 Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:
Matthew 28:20 Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.

Eph. 3:9 And to make all men see
        what is the fellowship of the mystery,
        which from the beginning of the world hath been hid in God,
        who created all things by Jesus Christ:

The SEVEN ONES were not what was HIDDEN. The CORE GOSPEL was not what was HIDDEN: Paul said of the ONE BAPTISM that until you are converted or baptized you CANNOT read BLACK text on BROWN paper.

Those who can read only the SEVEN ONES are assuredly BLIND as God's predestinated purpose.

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF THE GOSPEL OF THE KINGDOM? Is that BEYOND the seven ONES? Huh?

Eph. 3:10 To the intent that now unto
        the principalities and powers in heavenly places
        might be known by the church the manifold wisdom of God,
Eph. 3:11 According to the eternal purpose which he purposed in Christ Jesus our Lord:

PAUL DEFINES THE CHURCH FURTHER DOWN

YES: 2Pet. 1:19 We have also a more sure word of prophecy; 
        whereunto ye do well that ye take heed,
        as unto a light that shineth in a dark place,
        until the day dawn, and the day star arise in your hear
ts:
NO:  2Pet. 1:20 Knowing this first,
        that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation.
         ."


NO: 2Cor. 3:14 But their minds were blinded:
        for until this day remaineth
        the same vail untaken away
         in the reading of the old testament;
        which vail is done away in Christ.

2Cor. 3:15 But even unto this day,
        when Moses is read
, the vail is upon their heart.

YES: 2Cor. 3:16 Nevertheless when it shall turn to the Lord,
        the vail shall be taken away.
Jesus used the example of being CONVERTED and BORN AGAIN like a child
Luke recorded the example of BAPTISM to be SAVED and CONVERTED meaning the same thing.

Until you are CONVERTED you will not be able to read WHOLE THOUGHT PATTERNS written in BLACK INK on WHITE paper.


-Epi-strephô , pf.
 cause to return to the source of Being, tinas eis ta enantia kai ta prôta
      -Proteros and prôtos    II. of Time, former, earlier, children by the first or a former marriage,
       -Prosthhen in front, before, formerly, of place and of time;
                            to gennêthen phusei pros to gennêsan
-Genn-aô beget, bring forth, engender, call into existence
-Phuo 1 Act.:--bring forth, produce, put forth, 2. beget, engender, get understanding,
-Pros in the direction of
-Deut XXX WEB. It shall happen, when all these things are come on you, the blessing and the curse, which I have set before you, and you shall call them to mind among all the nations, where Yahweh your God has driven you,

[2]  and shall RETURN to Yahweh your God, and shall OBEY his voice according to all that I command you this day, you and your children, with all your heart, and with all your soul;

[3]  that then Yahweh your God will turn your captivity, and have compassion on you, and will return and gather you from all the peoples, where Yahweh your God has scattered you.
Further and universal proof that the trinity of "three persons" is not something you can unite with without being a polytheist and effectively denying that Jesus as the Christ of God revealed the Fullness of the Godhead.
2Cor. 3:17 Now the Lord is that Spirit: and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty.
2Cor. 3:18 But we all,
        with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord,
        are changed into the same image from glory to glory,
        even as by the Spirit of the Lord.

PAUL ALWAYS OUTLAWS THE RITUALS OF THE WORLD BEFORE HE COMMANDS SPEAKING WHICH IS NOT MUSICATING.

Getting drunk with wine appears as "getting FLUTED down with wine." This musical ritual made you "intoxicated with passion and pride."
Paul said worship IN THE SPIRIT because outside are the dogs or musicians howling for a partner.
Ephesians 4 define the same NON-MUSICAL "synagoguing" or teaching.

Before looking at 4:14 see that Jesus defined a parallel

Luke 7:31 And the Lord said, Whereunto then shall I liken the MEN of this generation? and to what are they like?

Luke 7:32 They are like unto CHILDREN sitting in the marketplace, and calling one to another, and saying, We have piped unto you, and ye have not danced; we have mourned to you, and ye have not wept.

Threnos (g2355) thray'-nos; from the base of 2360; wailing: - lamentation.
Threskeia
(g2356) thrace-ki'-ah; from a der. of 2357; ceremonial observance: - religion, worshipping.

Jesus consigned the children (play=pervert] as pipers, singers and dancers to the marketplace where they USED music to SEDUCE mostly male prostitutes.

Jesus cast the musical minstrels out LIKE DUNG associated with the marketplace and the dung heap and NOT in the church.  He died to give us REST from "ceremonial observance" which creates the "sounds of rusing waters" where no SHEEP can feed and no STRAIGHT Shepherd would take them.

Now, you know that an elder as the only Pastor-Teacher is to "teach that which is written" to mature "children" into "men" and to PREVENT the NAVIGATING THE WINDS OF CHANGE which always marks the musical perverts STALKING you.

Eph 4:14 That we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro, 
        and carried about with every wind of doctrine,
        by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness
whereby they lie in wait to deceive;
-Fluctuo  fluctus, to move in the manner of waves, i. e. to wave, rise in waves, undulate, to move to and fro, be driven hither and thither
I. Trop., to be restless, unquiet, uncertain, doubtful; to rage, swell; to waver, hesitate, vacillate, fluctuate,  Oratio II. In partic., formal language, artificial discourse,
-Oratio E. A prayer, an address to the Deity (eccl. Lat.): “respice ad orationem servi tui,Vulg. 3 Reg. 8, 28: “per orationes Dominum rogantes,id. 2 Macc. 10, 16: “pernoctans in oratione Dei,id. Luc. 6, 12.—Also absol., prayer, the habit or practice of prayer: “perseverantes in oratione,Vulg. Act. 1, 14: “orationi instate,id. Col. 4, 2; cf. Gell. 13, 22,

-cĭto . To put into quick motion, to move or drive violently or rapidly, to hurl, shake, rouse, excite, provoke, incite, stimulate, promote,
Carried About:
Greek Panourgia see more below

Latin:
-Circumfero to bear something or carry around  “lyram in conviviis,Quint. 1, 10, 19
-Lyra , ae, f., = lura,
I. a lute, lyre, a stringed instrument resembling the cithara, fabled to have been invented by Mercury and presented to Apollo, Hyg. Astr. 2, 7: “curvae lyrae parens,Hor. C. 1, 10, 6: “Threiciam digitis increpuisse lyram,Ov. H. 3, 118: “mox cecinit laudes prosperiore lyrā,id. A. A. 3, 50; Val. Fl. 5, 100.—
II. Transf.
A. Lyric poetry, song: “imbellis,Hor. C. 1, 6, 10: “Aeoliae Lesbis amica lyrae,Ov. Am. 2, 18, 26; id. P. 3, 3, 45.—
B. In gen., poetic genius: “Inferior lyra,Stat. Th. 10, 445.—
C. Lyra, the constellation, the Lyre: “exoriente Lyra,Ov. F. 1, 315; cf. Hyg. Astr. 3, 6; Varr. R. R. 2, 5.

-Con-vīvĭum , ii, n. vivo; lit., I. a living together; hence, a meal in company, a social feast, entertainment, banquet

-Quint. 1, 10, 19 From the importance thus given to music also originated the custom of taking a lyre round the company after dinner, and when on such an occasion Themistocles confessed that he could not play, his education was (to quote the words of Cicero) “regarded as imperfect.”
B.  Of a narrative or discourse, to publish abroad, proclaim, divulge, disseminate among the people, report
C. In the lang. of religion, to lustrate, purify any one by carrying around him consecrated objects (torches, offerings, etc.)
D.  In rhetoric: “oratio deducta et circumlata,expanded, drawn out into periods, Quint. 4, 1, 60 Spald.
-Ventus wind 3. Ventis verba dare, i. q. not to keep one's word or promise, Ov. H. 2, 25 Ruhnk.
B. [Plur., personified as deities, the winds: te, Apollo sancte, fer opem; teque, omnipotens Neptune, invoco, fame, applause, Turbo
p. Cic. Tusc. 4, 34, 73 (Com. Rel. v. 119 Rib.); Lucr. 5, 1230 (1228); cf. Ov. H. 17 (18

CHURCH MUST NEVER PERMIT PEOPLE CLAIMING TO NAVIGATE THE WINDS
Hermes appears to have been the chief of the Cabiri (Roscher, Myth. Lex. 2360); with his cult compare the Gallic (Caesar, B. G. vi. 17; Rhys, Hibbert Lectures, pp. 5-20 and ch. iv) and German (Tac. Germ. 9) worship of Mercurius. The latter, Odin, would seem to be like Hermes a wind god, and this may be true also of the Thracian deity. It seems improbable that the Thracians were content with so small a pantheon.
Mercury or Hermes is KAIROS: the demon spirit son of Zeus

CHURCH MUST EXCLUDE ALL OF THE CUNNING CRAFTSMEN.


Ephesians 4:11 And he gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists;
        and some, pastors and teachers;
Ephesians 4:12 For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry,
        for the edifying [educating] of the body of Christ:
Ephesians 4:13 Till we all come in the unity of the faith,
        and of the knowledge of the Son of God,
        unto a perfect man,
        unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ:
Ephesians 4:14 That we henceforth be no more children,
        tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine,
        by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive;

Wind of Doctrine
Venio A. In gen.: “vides, quo progrediente oratione venturum me puto,Cic. Rep. 1, 40, 62.
B. fin. and the passages there cited: “oratorum laus ita ducta ab humili venit ad summum, ut, etc.,
prava [crooked] ex falsis opinionibus veniunt,Quint. 5, 10, 34:

Latin săpĭo
ops voice, whether in speaking, shouting, lamenting or in singing, “Kirkēs . . aeidousēs opi kalēOd.10.221, cf. 5.61; aeidon   also of cicadae, “opa leirioessan hieisiIl.3.152;
  Leir-ioeis of the cicadae, opa leirioessan their delicate voice, 3.152; of the Muses' voice, Hes.Th.41; “HesperidesQ.S.2.418
Hes. Th. 41 So said the ready-voiced daughters of great Zeus, and they plucked and gave [30] me a rod, a shoot of sturdy laurel, a marvellous thing, and breathed into me a divine voice to celebrate things that shall be and things that were aforetime; and they bade me sing of the race of the blessed gods that are eternally, but ever to sing of themselves both first and last.
[35] But why all this about oak or stone? Come you, let us begin with the Muses who gladden the great spirit of their father Zeus in Olympus with their songs, telling of things that are and that shall be and that were aforetime with consenting voice. Unwearying flows the sweet sound [40] from their lips, and the house of their father Zeus the loud-thunderer is glad at the lily-like voice of the goddesses as it spreads abroad, and the peaks of snowy Olympus resound, and the homes of the immortals.
sophos

Panourgia (g3834) pan-oorg-ee'-ah; from 3835; adroitness, i.e. (in a bad sense) trickery or sophistry: - (cunning) craftiness, subtilty.

-Panourg-êma  A. knavish trick, villainy, S.El.1387 (lyr.), LXX Si.1.6 (v.l.); sophistry, Gal.5.251; cf. panourgeuma.

Cunning craftiness has the same meaning as SOPHOS:
1Cor. 3:18 Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you
        seemeth to be wise [sophos] in this world,
        let him become a fool, that he may be wise.
1Cor. 3:19 For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God.
        For it is written,
        He taketh the wise  sophia
        in their own craftiness. pa^nourg-ia
1Cor. 3:20 And again,
        The Lord knoweth the thoughts of the wise, sophōn
        that they are vain.
matai-os 
   
-Sophia A. cleverness or skill in handicraft and art, as in carpentry, tektonos, hos rha te pasēs eu eidē s. Il.15.412; of the Telchines, Pi.O.7.53; entekhnos s., of Hephaestus and Athena, Pl.Prt.32 1d; of Daedalus and Palamedes, X.Mem.4.2.33, cf. 1.4.2; in music and singing, tekhnē kai s. h.Merc.483, cf. 511; in poetry, Sol.13.52, Pi.O.1.117
-HH 4 483 What skill is this? What song for desperate cares? What way of song? For verily here are three things to hand all at once from which to choose, —mirth, and love, and sweet sleep. [450] And though I am a follower of the Olympian Muses who love dances and the bright path of song —the full-toned chant and ravishing thrill of flutes —yet I never cared for any of those feats of skill at young men's revels, as I do now for this:

And they say that from the utterance of Zeus you have learned both the honors due to the gods, O Far-worker, and oracles from Zeus, even all his ordinances. Of all these I myself have already learned that you have great wealth. Now, you are free to learn whatever you please; [475] but since, as it seems,
        your heart is so strongly set on playing the lyre,   [therefore]
        chant, and play upon it,
        and give yourself to merriment,
        taking this as a gift from me,
        and do you, my friend,
                bestow glory on me.
Sing well with this clear-voiced companion in your hands; for you are skilled in good, well-ordered utterance. [480] From now on bring it confidently to the rich feast and lovely dance and glorious revel, a joy by night and by day. Whoso with wit and wisdom enquires of it cunningly, him it teaches [485] through its sound all manner of things that delight the mind, being easily played with gentle familiarities, for it abhors toilsome drudgery; but whoso in ignorance enquires of it violently, to him it chatters mere vanity and foolishness.
NOTE: singing TO the lyre meant that you struck a note and then matched your voice  to that note: that does not make music.
HH 4 511 When Hermes had said this, he held out the lyre: and Phoebus Apollo took it, and readily put his shining whip in Hermes' hand, and ordained him keeper of herds. The son of Maia received it joyfully, [500] while the glorious son of Leto, the lord far-working Apollo, took the lyre upon his left arm and tried each string with the key. Awesomely it sounded at the touch of the god, while he sang sweetly to its note

Afterwards they two, the all-glorious sons of Zeus turned the cows back towards the sacred meadow, [505] but themselves hastened back to snowy Olympus, delighting in the lyre. Then wise Zeus was glad and made them both friends. And Hermes loved the son of Leto continually, even as he does now, when he had given the lyre as token to the Far-shooter, [510] who played it skilfully, holding it upon his arm. But for himself Hermes found out another cunning art and made himself the pipes whose sound is heard afar.
The Wise Sophos A. skilled in any handicraft or art, clever, mostly of poets and musicians, Pi.O.1.9, P.1.42, 3.113; en kithara s. E.IT1238

Craftiness Panourgia

2Cor. 4:1 Therefore seeing we have this ministry,
        as we have received mercy, we faint not;
2Cor. 4:2 But have renounced the hidden things of dishonesty,
        not walking in craftiness, nor handling the word of God deceitfully;
        but by manifestation of the truth commending ourselves
        to every man’s conscience in the sight of God.
2Cor. 4:3 But if our gospel be hid, it is hid to them that are lost:
-Panourg-os (properisp.), on, A. ready to do anything, wicked, knavish,
II. in a less positively bad sense, cunning, clever, smart, “p. kai deinosD. 1.3, cf. Pl.Tht.177a, Arist.EN1144a28; “p. te kai sophos Pl.R.409c; “kompsos kai p.Plu. 2.28a: Sup., Plb.5.75.2. Adv. “-gōs, p. kai hupokritikōs legein ta epē
Plato, Sophist 239e Well, if you like, let us say no more of you and me; but until we find someone who can accomplish this, let us confess that the sophist has in most rascally fashion hidden himself in a place we cannot explore.

Theaetetus   That seems to be decidedly the case.

Stranger   And so, if we say he has an art, as it were, of making appearances,

kataduō or kata-dunō :
with a notion of secrecy, insinuate oneself, steal into, “kataduetai eis to entos tēs psukhēs ho te rhuthmos kai harmonia

psu_kh-ē , ,
in exchange for life, 2. metaph. of things dear as life,
III. the immaterial and immortal soul,  IV. the conscious self or personality as centre of emotions, desires, and affections, 3. of the emotional self, “hupeirgasmai men eu psukhēn erōti
4. of the moral and intellectual self, the mind conscious of innocence

entos ,my senses, under my own control, e. tōn logismōnPlu.Alex.32; e. humōn in your hearts,. tōn metrōn tetmēmenon metallon within the bounds of the adjacent property, an encroachment, Hyp.Eux.35; “tōn metrōn
3. of Time, within,e. ou pollou khronouAntipho 5.69; “e. eikosin hēmerōnTh.4.39,
Plat. Soph. 239d he will easily take advantage of our poverty of terms to make a counter attack, twisting our words to the opposite meaning; when we call him an image-maker, he will ask us what we mean by “image,” exactly. So, Theaetetus, we must see what reply is to be made to the young man's question.

Theaetetus
Obviously we shall reply that we mean the images in water and in mirrors, and those in paintings, too, and sculptures, and all the other things of the same sort.

Eur. Alc. 766 Then taking an ivy-wood drinking-bowl in his hands and drinking unmixed wine, offspring of the dark grape, until the fire in it enveloped and warmed his heart, he garlanded his head with sprays of myrtle [760] and howled songs out of tune.
        There were two sorts of melody one could hear.
        He
was singing, paying no attention to the trouble in Admetus' house,
        while we servants were bewailing our mistress.
But we did not show our faces in tears to the stranger, for those were Admetus' orders. [765] And now I must feast the stranger in our house, some knavish thief or brigand, while my mistress has left the house without my following or holding out my hand in mourning for her. She was like a mother to me and to the other servants,
Proverbs 21.[11] When the mocker is punished, the simple gains wisdom; When the wise is instructed, he receives knowledge.

Sophos , ē, on, A. skilled in any handicraft or art, clever, harmatēlatas s. Pi.P.5.115, cf. N.7.17; “kubernētēsA.Supp.770; “mantisId.Th.382; “oiōnothetasS.OT484 (lyr.); of a sculptor, E.Fr.372; even of hedgers and ditchers, Margites Fr.2; but in this sense mostly of poets and musicians, Pi.O.1.9, P.1.42, 3.113; en kithara s. E.IT1238
etc.; also en oiōnois, kithara, E. IT662, 1238 (lyr.);
Pind. P. 5 [90] and he established, for the processions of Apollo, protector of men, a straight cut, level, paved road for the clatter of horses' hooves, where at the edge of the marketplace he rests by himself in death. He was blessed when he dwelled among men, [95] and thereafter a hero worshipped by the people. Apart from him, in front of the houses, are the other sacred kings who took their allotted places in Hades, and somehow below the earth they hear, in their minds, great excellence sprinkled with gentle dew [100] by the outpourings of victory-songs—prosperity for themselves, and a justly earned and shared grace for their son Arcesilas. It is fitting for him, in the song of the young men, to celebrate Phoebus with his golden sword, [105] now that he has received from Pytho the graceful victory-song as a compensation for his expense. Intelligent men praise him. I will say what has been said by others: [110] he nurtures a mind and tongue that are beyond his years; in courage he is a long-winged eagle among birds; his strength in competition is like a bulwark. Among the Muses, he has had wings since he was a child in his dear mother's lap

Pind. O. 1 From there glorious song enfolds the wisdom of poets,1 so that they loudly sing [10] the son of Cronus, when they arrive at the rich and blessed hearth of Hieron, who wields the scepter of law in Sicily of many flocks, reaping every excellence at its peak, and is glorified [15] by the choicest music, which we men often play around his hospitable table. Come, take the Dorian lyre down from its peg, if the splendor of Pisa and of Pherenicus placed your mind under the influence of sweetest thoughts,

Pind. P. 3. I will honor in my mind the fortune that attends me from day to day, tending it to the best of my ability. [110] But if a god were to give me luxurious wealth, I hope that I would find lofty fame in the future. We know of Nestor and Lycian Sarpedon, whom men speak of, from melodious words which skilled craftsmen join together. Through renowned songs excellence [115] gains a long life. But few find that easy to accomplish.

Kithara Kitharis II. playing on the cithara, “ouk an toi khraismē k.Il.3.54, cf. Od.8.248; “k. kai aoidēIl.13.731.

Eur. Ion 881 O you, who cause a voice to sing from your seven-stringed lyre, a voice that lets lovely-sounding hymns peal forth in the rustic lifeless horn, [885] son of Leto, I will blame you before this light. You came to me, your hair glittering with gold, when I was plucking into the folds of my robe yellow flowers [890] to bloom with golden light; grasping my white hand in yours, you led me to the bed in the cave, hearing me call on my mother, god and consort, [895] shamelessly paying homage to Aphrodite. I, the unhappy one, bore you a son, whom in fear of my mother I placed in that bed of yours, [900] where you joined with me, the miserable, the unfortunate one, in unhappy union. Alas! and now my son and yours, oh cruel one, is gone, torn apart, a feast for birds; [905] but you are singing to the lyre, chanting hymns.
Melpo more
Hupokritikos skilled, having a good delivery, the actors part, pretending

[1384] Behold how Ares stalks onward, 1385] breathing bloody vengeance that is hard to oppose. Just now have the hunters of wicked crimes [Panourgema] passed beneath that roof there, the hounds which none may flee. And so not long shall 1390] the vision of my soul hang in suspense.

WHY ARES STALKS: Theatrical performers creep in using a "womanish" approach

"a gradual and regular advance. pronemesthai is lit. ‘to go forward in grazing.’ The midd. occurs only here; nor is the act. found in a strictly parallel sense, as meaning to encroach on a neighbour's pastures, here: ‘the limit of a woman's belief (too lightly won) quickly oversteps the border’ (between fact and fiction).

Campbell suggests that the image in “pronemetai” is from fire ‘eating its way’ forward, and compares Her. 5. 101ap' oikiēs es oikiēn ion to pur epenemeto to astu”.

HOW CAN WE RECOGNIZE THE STALKERS UPSETTING YOUR COMFORT ZONES?

kuôn Harpies, A.R.2.289; of Hecate, in Mithraic worship, Porph.Abst.4.16; of the Bakchai, Lussas k. E.Ba.977 (lyr.); ; Pan is the kuôn of Cybele

[289] Dios kunas: cf. Aesch. Pr. 803 (of the griffins), Zēnos akrageis kunes: ib. 1022 (of the eagle), Dios ptēnos kuōn. 

Shepherds "Elders who don't bark."

Kunas: Kuôn II. as a word of reproach, freq. in Hom. of women, to denote shamelessness or audacity; applied by Helen to herself rhapsôidos of the Bakchai, Lussas k. E.Ba.977  Lussao rave, be mad, erotic. also of offensive persons, compared to yapping dogs

Euripides, Bacchae 977 Chorus
The meaning of LOOK TO THE HILLS:

[977] To the hills! to the hills! fleet hounds of madness, where the daughters of Cadmus hold their revels,

goad them into wild fury
against the
man disguised in woman's dress, a frenzied spy upon the Maenads.
Rhapsoidos stitching songs together. Reciter of poems,
of Aoide Used with "hypokrites" 5. = eppsdê, spell, incantation Prob. from rhaptō, aoidē; Hes.Fr. 265 speaks of himself and Homer as en nearois humnois rhapsantes aoidēn, and Pi.N.2.2 calls Epic poets rhaptōn epeōn aoidoi:

3. of the Cynics, areskei toutois kunôn metamphiennusthai bion. Catamites.

Epôidos  A. singing to or over, using songs or charms to heal wounds, epôidoi muthoi
    b. Subst., enchanter, e. kai goês E.Hipp. 1038 (but goês e. Ba.234): c. gen., a charm for or against,
    c. c. dat., assisting, profitable,
2. Pass., sung to music, phônai Plu.2.622d ; fit for singing, poiêtikên
2. epôidos, ho, verse or passage returning at intervals, in Alcaics and Sapphics,  chorus, burden,
Cunning craftiness is "having a good delivery" the actor's part. Techne craft, cunning, soothsayers, sorcerers, system of Rhetoric.

Rev. 18:22 And the voice of harpers, and musicians, and of pipers, and trumpeters, shall be heard no more at all in thee; and no craftsman [Techne, of whatsoever craft he be, shall be found any more in thee; and the sound of a millstone shall be heard no more at all in thee;

Sophistes 
A. master of one's craft, adept, expert, of diviners, Hdt.2.49; of poets, “meletan sophistais prosbalonPi.I.5(4).28, cf. Cratin.2; of musicians, “sophistēs . . parapaiōn khelun[harp]
Hdt. 2.49 Now then, it seems to me that Melampus son of Amytheon was not ignorant of but was familiar with this sacrifice. For Melampus was the one who taught the Greeks the name of Dionysus and the way of sacrificing to him and the phallic procession; he did not exactly unveil the subject taking all its details into consideration, for the teachers who came after him made a fuller revelation; but it was from him that the Greeks learned to bear the phallus along in honor of Dionysus, and they got their present practice from his teaching. [2] I say, then, that Melampus acquired the prophetic art, being a discerning man, and that, besides many other things which he learned from Egypt, he also taught the Greeks things concerning Dionysus, altering few of them; for I will not say that what is done in Egypt in connection with the god and what is done among the Greeks originated independently: for they would then be of an Hellenic character and not recently introduced. [3] Nor again will I say that the Egyptians took either this or any other custom from the Greeks. But I believe that Melampus learned the worship of Dionysus chiefly from Cadmus of Tyre and those who came with Cadmus from Phoenicia to the land now called Boeotia.

Pind. I. 5 If Aegina turns her steps to the clear road of god-given deeds, then do not grudge [25] to mix for her in song a boast that is fitting recompense for toils. In heroic times, too, fine warriors gained fame, and they are celebrated with lyres and flutes in full-voiced harmonies for time beyond reckoning. Heroes who are honored by the grace of Zeus provide a theme for skilled poets.... My swift tongue has many arrows, to shout the praises of these heroes. And now the city of Aias, Salamis, could testify that she was saved by her sailors in Ares' confrontation in the destructive storm sent by Zeus,
PAUL ISSUED THE SAME WARNING IN ALL OF HIS LETTERS AS DOES PETER

2 Tim 3: 12 Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.
2 Tim 3: 13 But evil men and seducers shall wax worse and worse,
        deceiving
[wandering stars], and being deceived.

John 17:14 I have given them thy word; and the world hath hated them,
        because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.
John 17:15 I pray not that thou shouldest take them out of the world,
        but that thou shouldest keep them from the evil.
John 17:16 They are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.

Colossians 1:13 Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness,
        and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son:

skotos , o(, more rarely skotos , eos, to (v. sub fin.), 5. of blindness, “skotou nephosS.OT 1313 (lyr.
b.  dizziness, vertigo, Hp.Epid. 5.23; “skotoi pro tōn ommatōnArist.HA584a3; cf. skotodinos, -diniaō.
8.  pl., skotē shadows in a picture, Paus.Gr.Fr.300, Suid. s.v. apeskotōmena, Eust.953.51.
N. 7.13prophasis
skoti-a , h(, (skotos)
A. darkness, gloom, A.R.4.1698, LXX (Mi.3.6, al.), NT (Ev.Matt.10.27, al.), cf. Moer.p.354 P.
II. in Architecture, scotia, cavetto, a sunken moulding, so called from the dark shadow it casts, Vitr.3.5.2, Hsch.
III. Skotia , epith. of Aphrodite in Egypt, Id.
Pind. N. 7 For he lives in a city that loves music, the city of the Aeacidae with their clashing spears;
        [10] and they very much want to foster a spirit familiar with contests.
        If someone is successful in his deeds,
        he casts a cause for sweet thoughts into the streams of the Muses.
For those great acts of prowess dwell in deep darkness, if they lack songs,
        and we know of only one way to hold a mirror up to fine deeds:
[15] if, by the grace of Mnemosyne with her splendid headdress,
        one finds a recompense for toils in glorious song.
        Skillful men know the wind that will come on the day after tomorrow,
        and they do not suffer loss through the love of gain.
The rich man and the poor man alike travel together to the boundary of death.
[20] And I expect that the story of Odysseus came to exceed his experiences, through the sweet songs of Homer,
        since there is a certain solemnity in his lies and winged artfulness,
        and poetic skill deceives, seducing us with stories,
        and the heart of the mass of men is blind.
        For if [25] they had been able to see the truth, then mighty Aias, in anger over the arms,
        would never have planted in his chest the smooth sword

SEDUCERS

1114.  goes, go´-ace; goao (to wail); properly, a wizard (as muttering spells), i.e. (by implication) an imposter:  seducer.

Goês , êtos, ho A. sorcerer, wizard, Phoronis 2, Hdt.2.33,4.105, Pl.R. 380d, Phld.Ir.p.29 W.; g. epôidos Ludias apo chthonos E.Ba.234 , cf. Hipp.1038; prob. f.l. for boêisi Hdt.7.191.

epōd-os Singing to or over, using charms to heal wounds, b. Subst., enchanter
2.
Pass., sung to music,phōnai
2.juggler, cheat, “deinos g. kai pharmakeus kai sophistēsPl.Smp.203d;
sophis-tēs A. master of one's craft, adept, expert, of diviners, of poets, “meletan sophistais prosbalon parapaiōn khelun” (play the lyre)
with modal words added, “hoi s. tōn hierōn melōn” (Melody in a holy place)

Rev. 18:21 And a mighty angel took up a stone like a great millstone, and cast it into the sea, saying, Thus with violence shall that great city Babylon be thrown down, and shall be found no more at all.
Rev. 18:22 And the voice of harpers, and musicians, and of pipers, and trumpeters, shall be heard no more at all in thee; and no craftsman, of whatsoever craft he be, shall be found any more in thee; and the sound of a millstone shall be heard no more at all in thee;
Rev. 18:23 And the light of a candle shall shine no more at all in thee; and the voice of the bridegroom and of the bride shall be heard no more at all in thee: for thy merchants were the great men of the earth; for by thy sorceries (Pharmakeia) were all nations deceived.
Rev. 18:24 And in her was found the blood of prophets, and of saints, and of all that were slain upon the earth.
The CORE gospel according to the SEVEN ONES specificially OUTLAWS "a good delivery" as the mark of a hypocrite: the Scriptures do not NEED this private interpretation.  This outlaws CUNNING CRAFTINESS which intends to OBLITERTE the gospel of the kingdom--the church.

Thise people are defined as SORCERERS who also from the foundation of the world were predestinated to be unleashed in the end times.

ONLY BY EXCLUDING ALL OF THE PERFORMING ARTS CAN YOU HOLD EKKKLESIA OR SYNAGOGUE

Christ defined the synagogue as the Church of Christ in the wilderness: He was the ROCK that followed them

This was INCLUSIVE of Rest, Reading and Rehearsing the Word of God.
This was EXCLUSIVE of vocal or instrumental rejoicing.
Pretty simple if you understand that the common people assembled only for instructions. This quarantined them from the later sacrificial system which had been abandoned to the worship of the starry host.

That was always the directly commanded practice which did not change.

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF THE CHURCH?
Eph. 3:8 Unto me, who am less than the least of all saints, is this grace given,
        that I should preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ;

Matthew 28:19 Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:
Matthew 28:20 Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.
No man can know the Mind of God but the Lord Jesus Christ and His prophets and apostles.

Eph. 3:9 And to make all men see what is the fellowship of the mystery,
        which from the beginning of the world hath been hid in God,
        who created all things by Jesus Christ:

Eph. 3:10 To the intent that now unto the principalities and powers in heavenly places
        might be known by the church the manifold wisdom of God,
Eph. 3:11 According to the eternal purpose which he purposed in Christ Jesus our Lord:
Eph. 3:12 In whom we have boldness and access with confidence by the faith of him.
NOW YOU KNOW WHY ALL OF THE HUMAN PERFORMERS MUST BE SILENCED.

NOW YOU CAN HOLD THE ASSEMBLY

 
Eph. 4:15 But speaking the truth in love,
        may grow up into him in all things, which is the head, even Christ:


HOW DO WE GET ACCESS TO THE TRUTH

The Church is a school (only) of the Word of Christ (only).  Paul
Eph. 5:17 Wherefore be ye not unwise,
        but understanding what the will of the Lord is.
Matthew 7.21 Not everyone who says to me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter into the Kingdom of Heaven;
        but he who does the will of my Father who is in heaven.
Eph. 5:18 And be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess;

Paul specifies Wine connected with the Symposia or the marketplace which in Athens was just down the hill from the Ekklesia which allowed reading and discussing matters handed to it by a higher authority.  He would certainly exclude anything which detracted from using one mind and one mouth to "speak that which is written for our learning" (Rom 15).
Methuskō , causal of methuō, make drunk, intoxicate, “Dionusos oide to methusai monon
Oinos , ho, Wine as well as III. name of Dionysus
Plat. Laws 649d Athenian
And are not these the conditions in which we are of the character described,—anger, lust, insolence, ignorance, covetousness, and extravagance; and these also,—wealth, beauty, strength, and everything which intoxicates a man with pleasure and turns his head? [Wine works faster and better]

Methuō also adds as metaphor
2. of persons, to be intoxicated with passion, pride, etc., “hupo tēs AphroditēsX.Smp.8.21; “hupo truphēs Pl.Criti. 121a; “erōtiAnacr.19; “ megethei tōn pepragmenōnD.4.49; “peri tas hēdonasPhilostr.VS1.22.1; “ou m. tēn phronēsinAlex.301; “m. to philēmaAP5.304.
b. to be stupefied, stunned, “plēgais methuōnTheoc.22.98; “ex odunaōnOpp.H.5.228, cf. Nonn.l.c.
tru^phaō , (truphē) III. give oneself airs, be dainty, fastidious, spoiled pets, Id.Men.76b; en tais ekklēsiais t. kai kolakeuesthai, [flattery]
Matthew 28:19 Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:
Matthew 28:20 Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.

kat-auleô , A. charm by flute-playing, tinos Pl.Lg.790e, cf. R.411a; tina Alciphr.2.1: metaph., se . . -êsô phobôi I will flute to you on a ghastly flute, E.HF871 (troch.):--Pass., of persons, methuôn kai katauloumenos drinking wine to the strains of the flute, Pl.R.561c; k. pros chelônidos psophon to be played to on the flute with lyre accompaniment, Posidon.10 J., cf. Call.Fr.10.3 P., Phld.Mus.p.49 K. 

1 Pet. 4:1 FORASMUCH then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, 
        arm yourselves likewise with the same mind:
        for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;
1 Pet. 4:2 That he no longer should live the rest of his time in the flesh
        to the lusts of men, but to the will of God.
1 Pet. 4:3 For the time past of our life may suffice us to have wrought the will of the Gentiles, when we walked in lasciviousness, lusts, excess of wine, revellings, banquetings, and abominable idolatries:

Hucksterism is called CORRUPTING the Word: selling learning at retail, adultery.

Cyrus was told how to passify people so they can do no harm to the CAPTORS:

Grant, then, forgiveness to the Lydians,
and to
make sure of their never rebelling against thee, or alarming thee more,
            send and
forbid them to keep any weapons of war,
            command them
to wear tunics under their cloaks, and to put buskins upon their legs,
            and make them bring up their sons to cithern-playing (Kitharizein),
           
singing (psallein),
            and shop-keeping (Hucksterism). 
So wilt thou soon see them become women instead of men,
and there will be no more fear of their revolting from thee."
          but be filled with the Spirit; [The Word of Christ John 6:63; Col 3:16]
Eph. 5:19 Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs,
        singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord;
Eph. 5:20 Giving thanks always for all things
        unto God and the Father
        in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ;

PAUL EXPLAINS BY SHOWING WHY CHRIST GAVE US A HOLY SPIRIT OR A GOOD CONSCIENCE By Saving us through baptism. 1. Peter 3:21

Eph. 5:26WEB That he might sanctify [same as A holy spirit Acts 2:38]
        and cleanse it

        with the washing of water
        [INTO] the word,
Matthew 28:19 Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:
Matthew 28:20 Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.
        WEB  In endu denotes either rest or motion within or into a place or thing;
Washing of water into:
Enduô
assume the person on, enter, enter the contest,
Xen. Cyrop. 8.1.12 If, therefore, those by whom the most numerous and most important affairs of state were to be transacted were not what they ought to be, he thought that his government would be a failure. But if they were all that they ought to be, he believed that everything would succeed. In this conviction, therefore, he took upon himself this charge; and he determined that the same practice of virtue should be his as well.
        For he thought that it was not possible for him to incite others
        to good and noble deeds, if he were not himself such as he ought to be.

Enduo (g1746) en-doo'-o; from 1722 and 1416 (in the sense of sinking into a garment); to invest with clothing (lit. or fig.): - array, clothe (with), endue, have (put) on.

for all of you who were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. Ga.3:27NIV

Washing of water into: 
Vulgate In the Word. Il.; en paidotribou the school of the training master.

INCLUDED ABSOLUTELY WITH NO INPUT FROM HUMAN ADDITIONS.

1Cor. 4:15 For though ye have ten thousand instructors in Christ,

        yet have ye not many fathers:
        for in Christ Jesus I have begotten you through the gospel.
1Cor. 4:16 Wherefore I beseech you, be ye followers of me.
1Cor. 4:17 For this cause have I sent unto you Timotheus, who is my beloved son,
        and faithful in the Lord, who shall bring you into remembrance
        of my ways which be in Christ,
        as I teach every where in every church.

EXCLUDED ABSOLUTELY BY LAW AND COMMON DECENCY

Aristoph. Cl. 973 Then again, their master would teach them, not sitting cross-legged, to learn by rote a song, either “pallada persepolin deinan” or “teleporon ti boama” raising to a higher pitch the harmony which our fathers transmitted to us. But if any of them were to play the buffoon, or to turn any quavers, like these difficult turns the present artists make after the manner of Phrynis, he used to be thrashed, being beaten with many blows, as banishing the Muses. And it behooved the boys, while sitting in the school of the Gymnastic-master, to cover the thigh, so that they might exhibit nothing indecent to those outside; then again, after rising from the ground, to sweep the sand together, and to take care not to leave an impression of the person for their lovers. And no boy used in those days to anoint himself below the navel; so that their bodies wore the appearance of blooming health. Nor used he to go to his lover, having made up his voice in an effeminate tone, prostituting himself with his eyes.
X.Mem.1.6.13  Xen. Mem. 1.6.13
To this Socrates replied: “Antiphon, it is common opinion among us in regard to beauty and wisdom that there is an honourable and a shameful way of bestowing them.
        For to offer one's beauty for money to all comers is called prostitution;
        but we think it virtuous to become friendly with
              a lover who is known to be a man of honour.

       So is it with wisdom. Those who offer it to all comers for money
              are known as sophists, prostitutors of wisdom,

       but we think that he who makes a friend of one whom he knows to be gifted
       by nature, and teaches him all the good he can,
       fulfils the duty of a citizen and a gentleman.
Plut. Agis 10 of Phrynis: Training in luxury, effeminancey and Greed... [4] “Thou praisest Ecprepes,” said Agis, “who, as ephor, cut out with an adze two of the nine lute-strings of Phrynis the musician, and likewise the magistrates in the time of Timotheus, who did the same thing in their turn, but thou blamest me for trying to remove luxury, extravagance, and ostentation from Sparta, as if those magistrates also were not on the watch to prevent the pompous and superfluous in music from making such advances as our lives and manners have come to, whose excess and discord has made the city dissonant and out of tune with itself.”
WHAT IS THE SOLE PURPOSE?

Eph. 5:27 That he might present it to himself a glorious church,
        not having spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing;
        but that it should be holy and without blemish
WHAT IS TRUTH?
John 17:8 For I have given unto them the words which thou gavest me;
        and they have received them, and have known surely that I came out from thee,
        and they have believed that thou didst send me.
John 17:9 I pray for them: I pray not for the world,
        but for them which thou hast given me; for they are thine.
John 17:10 And all mine are thine, and thine are mine; and I am glorified in them.
John 17:14 I have given them thy word; and the WORLD hath hated them,
        because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.
John 17:15 I pray not that thou shouldest take them out of the world,
        but that thou shouldest keep them from the evil.
John 17:16 They are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.
John 17:17 Sanctify them through thy truth: thy word is truth.
WHAT IS THE WORLD?  See details below.

The Kosmos is a word invented by Phythagoras: he travelled throughout the area and brought the Babylonian system of religion to the Greek-Roman World. These would be one of the "food sects" Paul prevented from discussing their diversities in church.

Eph. 4:16 From whom the whole body fitly joined together and compacted
        by that which every joint supplieth,
        according to the effectual working in the measure of every part,
        maketh increase of the body unto the edifying of itself in love.


In Romans 15 edifying is defined as the use of "Scripture" or "that which is written for our learning."

In Romans 14 Paul outlawed doubtful disputations which means any personal opinion or diversity: that then permits what Paul called the synagogue to function as a School of Christ in the Word which is its sole purpose.
Rom. 15:1 We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak,
        and not to please ourselves.
Rom. 15:2 Let every one of us please his neighbour for his good to edification.
Rom. 15:3 For even Christ pleased not himself; but, as it is written,
        The reproaches of them that reproached thee fell on me.
Rom. 15:4 For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning,
        that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope.
Rom. 15:5 Now the God of patience and consolation grant you
        to be likeminded one toward another according to Christ Jesus:
Rom. 15:6 That ye may with one mind and one mouth glorify God,
        even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.
Rom. 15:7 Wherefore receive ye one another, as Christ also received us to the glory of God.
Rom. 15:8 Now I say that Jesus Christ was a minister of the circumcision for the truth of God,
           to confirm the promises made unto the fathers:
Eph. 4:17 This I say therefore, and testify in the Lord,
        that ye henceforth walk not as other Gentiles walk,
        in the vanity of their mind,

Vanitas I. Lit., emptiness, nothingness, nullity, want of reality, popular opinion, Magus, Magice.
măgus , a, um, adj. 1. magus, Pythagoricus Ludibrium

Note Above: Pythagoras and the World or Kosmos people God does not speak to and Jesus does not pray for.

I.
magic, magical (poet.): “artes,Ov. Am. 1, 8, 5: “manus, id. Med. fac. 36: carmen,Sen. Herc. Oet. 467.
Ludibrium wantonnessA. A laughing-stock, butt, jest, sport:, 
Ov. Am. 1.8
She magick arts and Thessale charmes doth know,
And makes large streams back to their fountaines flow,
She knows with gras, with thrids on wrong wheeles spun...

Charms Carmen.
I. a tune, song; poem, verse; an oracular response, a prophecy; a form of incantation (cf.: cano, cantus, and canto).
I. In gen., a tune, song, air, lay, strain, note, sound, both vocal and instrumental
Behold what gives the Poet but new verses?
And thereof many thousand he rehearses.
The Poets God arayed in robes of gold,
Of his gilt Harpe the well tun'd strings doth hold.
LetHomer yeeld to such as presents bring,
(Trust me) to give, it is a witty thing.
Nor, so thou maist obtaine a wealthy prize,
The vaine name of inferiour slaves despize.
Magicus I. of or belonging to magic, magic, magical,   magici, that were invoked by incantations (as Pluto, Hecate see above, Proserpine) “cantus,Juv. 6, 610: “magicae resonant ubi Memnone chordae,
Eph. 4:18 Having the understanding darkened,
        being alienated from the life of God through the ignorance that is in them,
        because of the blindness of their heart:

Paul told the Jews in Corinth that they had been blinded because of refusing to listen to God and going on to engage in musical idolatry at Mount Sinai, that they would not be able to read BLACK text on BROWN paper until they turned or converted to Christ. This has the same purpose of baptism which gives A holy spirit or A good conscience or a co-perception.
Luke 1:76 And thou, child, shalt be called the prophet of the Highest:
        for thou shalt go before the face of the Lord to prepare his ways;
Luke 1:77 To give knowledge of salvation unto his people by the remission of their sins,
Luke 1:78 Through the tender mercy of our God;
        whereby the dayspring from on high hath visited us,
Luke 1:79 To give light to them that sit in darkness and in the shadow of death,
        to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Only obedience in baptism is said to give remission of sins AND the knowledge of salvation.
Eph. 4:19 Who being past feeling have given themselves over unto lasciviousness,
        to work all uncleanness with greediness.

Despero to be hopeless; to have no hope of, to despair of, to give up

Operatio A.  A religious performance, service, or solemnity, a bringing of offerings: operationes denicales, offerings,

Avaritia greedy desire for passions, eager sesire for renown or glory.

Uncleanness like a prosltitute "tricked out."

Akatharsia (g167) ak-ath-ar-see'-ah; from 169; impurity (the quality), phys. or mor.: - uncleanness. 

But fornication, and all uncleanness, or covetousness, let it not be once named among you, as becometh saints; Ep.5:3

Akathartos (g169) ak-ath'-ar-tos; from 1 (as a neg. particle) and a presumed der. of 2508 (mean. cleansed); impure (cer., mor. lewd] or spec. doemonic]): - foul, unclean.

Daimôn Perh. from daiô B, to divide or distribute destinies.]

I. a god, goddess, like theos, thea,  also deity or divine power (theos denotes a god in person), Lat. numen; pros daimona against the divine power; sun daimoni [Apollo] with it, by its favour, Il.:--so, kata daimona,

2. one's daemon or genius, one's lot or fortune, stugeros daimôn Od.; daimonos aisa kakê id=Od.: absol. good or ill fortune, Trag.; esp. of the evil genius of a family, Aesch.

II. daimones, in Hes., are the souls of men of the golden age, forming the link between gods and men:--later, of any departed souls, Lat. manes, lemures, Luc.

III. in NTest. an evil spirit, a demon, devil.

For this ye know, that no whoremonger, nor unclean person, nor covetous man, who is an idolater, hath any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God. Ep.5:5

1 Tim 1:10 For whoremongers,
............ for them that defile themselves with mankind,
............ for menstealers, for liars, for perjured persons,
............ and if there be any other thing that is contrary to sound doctrine;

1 Tim 1:11 According to the glorious gospel of the blessed God,
............ which was committed to my trust.

2 Cor 2:17 For we are not as many, which corrupt the word of God: but as of sincerity, but as of God, in the sight of God speak we in Christ.

Kapeleuo (g2585) kap-ale-yoo'-o; from kapelos , (a huckster); to retail, i.e. (by impl.) to adulterate (fig.): - corrupt

kapēl-ikos , ē, on, A. of or for akapēlos, zugon  campfollowers, sutlers of an army, in a mercenary spirit, Sophistesmaster of one's craft, adept, expert, of diviners, Hdt.2.49; of poets, “meletan sophistais prosbalonPi.I.5(4).28, cf. Cratin.2; of musicians, “sophistēs . . parapaiōn khelunA.Fr.314, cf. Eup.447, Pl.Com. 140; sophistē Thrēki (sc. Thamyris) E.Rh.924, cf. Ath.14.632c: with modal words added, “hoi s. tōn hierōn melōn

kapêl-euô , A. to be a retail-dealer, drive a petty trade... kapêleu' drive a trade, chaffer with your vegetable food Hdt.1.155

II. c. acc., sell by retail, ton herpin Hippon.51 .

2. metaph., k. ta prêgmata, of Darius,  mathêmata sell learning by retail, hawk it about, Pl. Prt.313d; k. ton logon tou theou 2 Ep.Cor.2.17 ; . fight half-heartedly, A.Th. 545; k. têi Chariti tên amoibên Epicur. politeian traffic in grants of citizenship, D.C.60.17;  of prostitutes, Ph.2.394,576; eirênên pros Rhômaious Chrusiou k. Hdn.6.7.9; tuchê kapêleuousa . . ton bion playing tricks with life, [p. 876] corrupting 

Iamblichus.

There are some, however, who suppose there is likewise, the subject-race of a tricky nature, artful, and assuming all shapes, turning many ways, that personates gods and dæmons and souls of the dead like actors on the stage; and that through these everything that seems to be good or bad is possible. They are led to form this judgment because these subject-spirits are not able to contribute anything really beneficial as relates to the soul, nor even to perceive such things; but on the other hand, they ill treat, deride, and often impede those who are returning to virtue.

They are likewise full of conceit, and take delight in vapors and sacrifices.

5. Because the begging priest with open mouth attempts in many ways to raise our expectations. Note 13

13. The agurtes or begging priest generally belonged to the worship of Rhea [ZOE] or Cybele, the Mother. He is frequently depicted in a most unfavorable light. Apuleius speaks of a company of these emasculate priests in the eighth book of the Metamorphoses. They are also described in the Republic of Plato:

"Agurtæ and Mantics frequent the houses of the rich and persuade them that they possess a power granted by the gods to expiate,

by sacrifices and chants any unjust act that has been committed and that they induce the gods by blandishments and magic rites to help them.

They collected money in this way, and they also followed the selling of nostrums and telling of fortunes."

G726 harpazÿ har-pad'-zo From a derivative of G138 ; to seize (in various applications):;catch (away, up), pluck, pull, take (by force).

Eph. 4:20 But ye have not so learned Christ;
Eph. 4:21 If so be that ye have heard him,
        and have been taught BY him,
        as the truth is in Jesus
:
Matthew 28:19 Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:
Matthew 28:20 Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.
Eph. 4:22 That ye put off concerning the former conversation the old man,
        which is corrupt according to the deceitful lusts;
Phtheirō 3.  corrupt, bribe, tina D.S.4.73; lure, entice, trap,kēmoisi plektois porphuras phtheirei genosS.Fr.504 (s. v. l.); “phtheirei gar pronoia tēn aboulianentices to its ruin, entraps 
akouō se lurōdou gunaikos
b. seduce a woman, “hupo tēs thugatros adikoumenon kai Dionusiou tou phtheirantos autēn kinaidou” (Dog, Cynic, Catamite) “pharmakōn
II b. with a Prep., phtheiresthai pros tous plousious, of hangers-on and flatterers, D.21.139, cf. Plu.Phoc.21, Eum. 14, Ant.24; “eis hēdonas apo . . ponōn
phthora8), “poson khronon pontou 'pi nōtois halion ephtheirou planon;E.Hel.774;
planos 1. Act., leading astray, deceiving, p. kateseion edōdan the bait, Theoc.21.43, cf. AP7.702 (Apollonid.); p. dōra, agra, Mosch.1.29, Fr.1.10; “pneumata1 Ep.Ti.4.1.
III. of persons, planos, ho, vagabond,impostor, Nicostr.Com.24, Dionys.Com. 4, D.S.34/5.2.14, Ev.Matt.27.63.
1 Timothy 4.1 But the Spirit says expressly that in later times some will fall away from the faith, paying attention to seducing spirits and doctrines of demons,
CORRUPT is Listening to a female Lyre Player
akouō se lurōdou gunaikos
Lur-aoidos (or rather luraoidos Hdn.Gr.1.229), o(, h(,
A. one who sings to the lyre, AP7.612 (Agath.), APl.4.279:—contr. lurōdos , AP6.118 (Antip.), Plu.Sull.33: Adj. -“ōdos harmoniaCallistr.Stat.7.
Plut. Sull. 33 [2] He conducted the sales of confiscated estates in such arrogant and imperious fashion, from the tribunal where he sat, that his gifts excited more odium than his robberies.
        He bestowed on handsome women, musicians,
        comic actors
, and the lowest of freedmen,
        the territories of nations and the revenues of cities,
        and women were married against their will to some
        of his favourites
Aōdos , o( (and in Paus.10.5.12, h(), contr. for aoidos,
A. singer,khrēsmōn” (A. oracular response, oracle) E.Heracl.488, cf. Phld.Mus.p.20 K., etc.; meta Lesbion ōdon, prov. of a second-rate musician, Cratin.243, cf. Arist.Fr.545; “hoi tou Dionusou ō.Pl.Lg.812b; khorous tinas . . ōdous ib.800e; of cicadae, “hoi huper kephalēs ō.Id.Phdr.262d, cf. AP6.54 (Paul.Sil.); “ton alektruona ton ōdon apopnixasa mouPl.Com.14D.; hupo ton ōdon ornitha about cockcrow, Poll.1.71.
II. the cup passed round when a scolion was sung,

THIS IDENTIFIES THE CROOKED GENERATION OF ACTS
Eph. 4:23 And be renewed in the spirit of YOUR mind;
Eph. 4:24 And that ye put on the new man,
        which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness.


AGAIN, THE MEANING OF THE ASSEMBLY OR ANYWHERE

Eph. 4:25 Wherefore putting away LYING,
        speak every man truth with his neighbour:
        for we are members one of another.

SPEAK IS THE OPPOSITE OF POETRY OR MUSIC: MUSIC WAS ALWAYS KNOWN AS LYING
Mendācĭum B.  Esp., a fable, fiction (Opposite historic truth): “poëtarum,” “prophetāsti mendacium,Vulg. Jer. 20, 6; cf. id. ib. 27, 10: “credere mendacio,to believe a lie, id. 2 Thess. 2, 11.
Jer. 20:6 And thou, Pashur, and all that dwell in thine house shall go into captivity: and thou shalt come to Babylon, and there thou shalt die, and shalt be buried there, thou, and all thy friends, to whom thou hast prophesied lies.
Pŏēta , ae (POETES, Inscr. Orell. 1163), m., = poiētēs.
I. In gen., a maker, producer (ante-class.): “nec fallaciam Astutiorem ullus fecit poëta,a contriver, trickster, Plaut. Cas. 5, 1, 7: “tu poëta es prorsus ad eam rem unicus,you are just fit for it, id. As. 4, 1, 3.—
poëta, Enn. ap. Cic. Ac. 2, 16, 51 (Ann. v. 6 Vahl.); Cic. de Or. 2, 46, 194: “oratores et poëtae,id. ib. 3, 10, 39: “versificator quam poëta melior,Quint. 10, 1, 89
Scaenĭcus (scen- ), a, um, adj., = skēnikos

Pseudos , eos, to/, Ep. dat. pl. pseudessi, in NT of what is opposed to religious truth, false doctrine, Ep.Rom.1.25; poiōn bdelugma kai ps., i.e. doing what is repugnant to the true faith, Apoc.21.27;
Rom. 1:23 And changed the glory of the uncorruptible God into an image
        made like to corruptible man, and to birds, and fourfooted beasts,
        and creeping things.
Rom. 1:24 Wherefore God also gave them up to uncleanness through the lusts of their own hearts, to dishonour their own bodies between themselves:
Rom. 1:25 Who changed
        the truth of God into a lie [poiōn, poetry or music]
        and worshipped and served the creature [effeminate male performers]
        more than the Creator, who is blessed for ever. Amen.
Rom. 1:26 For this cause
        God gave them up unto vile affections:
        for even their women did change the natural use into that which is against nature:
SEE PAUL'S REFERENCE TO MOUNT SINAI AS HE DOES IN OTHER PLACES.

"When the Hebrews were in Egypt - living as Egyptians, worshipping the Golden Calf of Horus, etc. - they also worshipped Horus's "twin," Set, whence comes Satan. Where Horus is the Golden Sun in the Age of Taurus the Bull, Set represents the Serpent of the Night, i.e., the night-time sky. The battle between Horus/Jesus and Set/Satan represents the struggle between day and night for supremacy.

"The triumphal hymn of Moses had unquestionably a religious character about it; but the employment of music in religious services, though idolatrous, is more distinctly marked in the festivities which attended the erection of the golden calf." (Smith's Bible Dictionary, Music, p. 589).

Stephen in Acts 7 refers to the worship of the starry host to which God abandoned Israel.

Take thou away from me the noise of thy songs
        for I will not hear the melody of thy viols. Amos 5:23
But let judgment run down as waters,
        and
righteousness as a mighty stream. Amos 5: 24

But ye have borne the tabernacle of your Moloch and Chiun your images, the star of your god, which ye made to yourselves. Amos 5: 26
Therefore will I cause you to go into captivity beyond Damascus, saith the Lord,whose name is The God of hosts. Amos 5: 27

Rev. 21:7 He that overcometh shall inherit all things;
        and I will be his God, and he shall be my son.
Rev. 21:8 But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.

Rev. 21:27 And there shall in no wise enter into it any thing that defileth, neither whatsoever worketh abomination, or maketh a lie: but they which are written in the Lamb’s book of life.
TESTIMONY OF HISTORY

Hide me from the secret counsel of the wicked; from the insurrection (noisy crowd) of the workers of iniquity: Psalm 64:2NIV 

They sharpen their tongues like swords and aim their words like deadly arrows. Psalm 64:3

Shanan (h8150) shaw-nan'; a prim. root; to point (trans. or intrans.); intens. to pierce; fig. to inculcate: - prick, sharp (en), teach diligently, whet.

Whose arrows are sharp, and all their bows bent, their horses hoofs shall be counted like flint, and their wheels like a whirlwind: Is.5:28

According to Philo condenming instrumental music at religious festivals, the gods of the pagans exploit this weakness of men. For the sake of a better effect,
        and with the
intention of more easily cheating their devotees,
        they have set their lies to melodies, rhythms and meters.


Philodemus held as
self deceptive the view that music mediated religious ecstasy. He saw the entire condition induced by the noise of cymbals and tambourines as a disturbance of the spirit.
        He found it significant that, on the whole,
       
only women and effeminant men fell into this folly.
Accordingly, nothing of value could be attributed to music; it was no more than a slave of the sensation of pleasure, which satisfied much in the same way that food and drink did.
Johannes Quasten 
Eph. 4:26 Be ye angry, and sin not: let not the sun go down upon your wrath:
Eph. 4:27 Neither give place to the devil.

First, God in Christ makes room only for evangelists who teach that which HAS BEEN taught and AS it has been taught. Of the future "School of the Word" Christ said:
Is. 8:20 To the law and to the testimony:
        if they speak not according to this word,
        it is because there is no light in them.
Second, when God delivers Spirit or Word to the Son, he speaks WITHOUT METER.  And so, none of the Bible can be sung in the modern tunful sense: that mark is left to identify LIARS and ROBBERS.

Third, there is NO FUNDING for the extra "ministry staff" riding on the backs of widows and honest workers.

Therefore, all of the STAFF speak "on their own" and Jesus said they were sons of the Devil. Therefore again,


Eph. 4:28 Let him that stole steal no more:
        but rather let him labour, working with his hands the thing which is good,
        that he may have to give to him that needeth.

Eph. 4:29 Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth,
        but that which is good to the use of edifying, (Education)
        that it may
minister grace unto the hearers.
Eph. 4:30 And grieve not the holy Spirit of God,
        whereby ye are sealed unto the day of redemption.

Eph. 4:31 Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and clamour,
        and evil speaking, be put away from you, with all malice:

31 pasa pikria kai thumos kai orgē kai kraugē kai blasphēmia arthētō aph' humōn sunpasēkakia.
Thumos A. soul, spirit, as the principle of life, feeling and thought, esp. of strong feeling and passion (rightly derived from thuō
II. soul, as shown by the feelings and passions; and so,
1. desire or inclination, esp. desire for meat and drink, appetite,

Orge A. natural impulse or propensity (v. orgaō II): hence, temperament, disposition, mood suiting one's own mood or human wisdom, sophian hēgoumenos” [leader] Pl.R.493d.
Sophia . cleverness or skill in handicraft and art, in music and singing, tekhnē kai s. h.Merc.483, cf. 511; in poetry,

Plat. Rep. 493d that it is wisdom to have learned to know the moods and the pleasures of the motley multitude in their assembly, whether about painting or music or, for that matter, politics? For if a man associates with these
        and offers and exhibits to them his poetry or any other product of his craft or any political service,             and grants the mob authority over himself more than is unavoidable, 
        the proverbial necessity of Diomede will compel him to give the public what it likes,
        but that what it likes is really good and honorable,
                have you ever heard an attempted proof of this that is not simply ridiculous?”

Ridiculous: they have heard no argument advanced for it but such as might make the angels and almost the very jack-asses weep

Krauge Crying, screaming, shouthing, speaking in a loud voice,
Aeschin. 1 167 His offensive talk against Philip is foolish and out of place, but not so serious a mistake as that which I am about to mention. For confessedly he will be making his slanderous charges against a man—he who is himself no man. But when he insinuates shameful suspicions against the boy, by deliberately applying to him words of double meaning, he makes our city ridiculous.
AeirōII. raise up, exalt, “apo smikrou d' an areias meganA.Ch.262, cf. 791; olbon  Dareios ēren Id.Pers.164:—esp. of pride and passion, exalt, excite, hupsou ai. thumon grow excited, S.OT914;

2. raise by words, hence, praise, extol, E.Heracl.322, etc.; ai. logō to exaggerate, D.21.71.
2. ogkon arasthai to be puffed up, S.Aj. 129; “thaumaston ogkon aramenoi tou muthouPl.Plt.277b.
Pind. O. 1 From there glorious song enfolds the wisdom of poets, so that they loudly sing [10] the son of Cronus, when they arrive at the rich and blessed hearth of Hieron, who wields the scepter of law in Sicily of many flocks, reaping every excellence at its peak, and is glorified [15] by the choicest music, which we men often play around his hospitable table. Come, take the Dorian lyre down from its peg, if the splendor of Pisa placed your mind under the influence of sweetest thoughts,...
        Yes, there are many marvels, [Thaumatos lying wonders]
        and yet I suppose the speech of mortals beyond the true account
        can be deceptive, stories adorned with embroidered lies;
[30] and Grace, who fashions all gentle things for men,
        confers esteem and often contrives to make believable the unbelievable.
        But the days to come are the wisest witnesses.
and of Pherenicus
Homer Odyssey Hom. Od. 21.401
3. raise, lift, “tupōma ērmenoi kheroinS.El.54; kanoun ai. Ar.Av.850; “bousIG22.1028.28, cf. Thphr.Char.27.5; rhothion raise a surging cheer, Ar.Eq. 546; “Samosata aramenos metethēken
Arariskō (redupl. form of root ar,
2. please, gratify,eme g' ha stonoess' ara^ren phrenasS.El.147 (lyr
V. make fitting or pleasing, arsantes kata thumon (sc. to geras), Il.1.136.
Areskō a^,  appease, conciliate,.
PARALLEL: OF WHAT PAUL CALLS THE SYNAGOGUE OR CHURCH 
Rom. 15:1 We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.

Plăcĕo  1. In scenic lang., of players or pieces presented, to please, find favor, give satisfaction: “primo actu placeo, Ter. Hec. prol. alt. 31: cui scenico placenti
2. Placere sibi, to be pleased or satisfied with one's self, to flatter one's self, to pride or plume one's self:
        scaenĭcus (scen- ), a, um, adj., = skēnikos,  
        I. of or belonging to the stage, scenic, dramatic, theatrical (class.).
        I. Lit.: “poëtae,dramatic poets, Varr. L. L. 9, § 17 Müll.: “artifices,players, actors 
       “gestus,Cic. de Or. 3, 59, 220: “modulatio,Quint. 11, 3, 57:
        2. scaenĭca , ae, f., a female player, an actressorgana,
Orgănum , i, n., = organon, I. an implement, instrument, engine of any kind
Vitr. 10, 1.—Of musical instruments, a pipe, Quint. 11, 3, 20; 9, 4, 10; Juv. 6, 3, 80; Vulg. Gen. 4, 21; id. 2 Par. 34, 12 et saep.

Organon , to/, (ergon, erdō) . instrument, implement, tool, for making or doing a thing
A. 3. musical instrument, Simon.31, f.l. in A.Fr.57.1 ; ho men di' organōn ekēlei anthrōpous, of Marsyas, Pl.Smp.215c ; aneu organōn psilois logois ibid., cf. Plt.268b ; “o. polukhordaId.R.399c, al.; “met' ōdēs kai tinōn organōnPhld.Mus.p.98K.; of the pipe, Melanipp.2, Telest.1.2.

Rom. 15:2 Let every one of us please his neighbour for his good to edification.

Aedificatio, I. Abstr., the act of building, a building or constructing. II. Concr., a building, a structure, edifice,
III. Figurative, building up, instructing, edification.
    Absolute: loquitur ad Aedificationem 
    aedificationem Ecclesiae,Vulg. 1 Cor. 14, 12 ; ib. Eph. 4, 12.
1Cor. 14:3 But he that prophesieth speaketh
1Cor. 14:12 Even so ye, forasmuch as ye are zealous of spiritual gifts,
        seek that ye may excel to the edifying of the church.
Loquor a. [Sanscr. lap-, to talk, whisper; Gr. lak-, elakon, laskô], to speak, talk, say (in the language of common life, in the tone of conversation;  
B. Act. 1. To speak out, to say, tell, talk about, mention, utter, name, declare, show, indicate or express clearly

Logos Speak opposite of myty, poetry, meter
Logik-os , ē, on, (logos) A. of or for speaking or speech, merē l. the organs of speech, Plu.Cor.38: logikē, , speech, Opposite . mousikē, D.H. Comp. 11; “l. phantasiaexpressed in speech, Stoic.2.61.
Plut. Cor. 38. These words were actually uttered twice, as the story runs,
        which would have us believe what is difficult of belief and probably never happened.
For that statues have appeared to sweat, and shed tears, and exude something like drops of blood, is not impossible; since wood and stone often contract a mould which is productive of moisture, and cover themselves with many colours, and receive tints from the atmosphere; and there is nothing in the way of believing that the Deity uses these phenomena sometimes as signs and portents.
        [2] It is possible also that statues may emit a noise like a moan or a groan,
        by reason of a fracture or a rupture, which is more violent
        if it takes place in the interior.
But that articulate speech, and language so clear and abundant and precise, should proceed from a lifeless thing, is altogether impossible; since not even the soul of man, or the Deity, without a body duly organized and fitted with vocal parts, has ever spoken and conversed.
SPEAK FOR EDIFICATION IS OPPOSITE TO MUSIC

Mousikē (sc. tekhnē), A. any art over which the Muses presided, esp. poetry sung to music, Pi.O.1.15, Hdt.6.129; “mousikēs agōnTh.3.104, cf. IG12.84.16, etc.; “poiēsis kata mousikēnPl.Smp.196e, cf. 205c; tis tekhnē, hēs to kitharizein kai to adein kai to embainein orthōs; Answ. “mousikēn moi dokeis legeinId.Alc.1.108d.

Rom. 15:3 For even Christ pleased not himself; but, as it is written,
        The reproaches of them that reproached thee fell on me.
Rom. 15:4 For whatsoever things were written aforetime
        were written for our learning,
        that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope.

Para-klêsis, eôs, hê, calling to one's aid, summons, hoi ek paraklêseôs sunkathêmenoi a packed party in the assembly, D.18.143.

2. imploring, appealing, tinos of or on the part of one,  
3. invocation of gods,  , PLond.3.1164d10 (iii A. D.).
II. exhortation, address,  parainesin grapsantes 
        not a mere address to their feelings,
        but counsel to act rightly  Isoc.1.5; p. tôn politôn pros aretên Aeschin.1.117 ;
tên tês sôphrosunês paraklêsin . . autous parakeklêka Id.2.180 ; axiôseiskai-klêseis Plb.1.67.10 .
III. consolation, LXX Is.30.7, Na.3.7Ep.Hebr.6.18,
Isoc. 1 5  Therefore, I have not invented a hortatory exercise, but have written a moral treatise; and I am going to counsel you on the objects to which young men should aspire and from what actions they should abstain, and with what sort of men they should associate and how they should regulate their own lives. For only those who have travelled this road in life have been able in the true sense to attain to virtue—that possession which is the grandest and the most enduring in the world.
This discourse is really hortatory in the general sense of that word, but Isocrates distinguishes it from hortatory (“protreptic”) discourses of the sophists, which were lectures to stimulate interest in whatever kind of learning they professed to teach, commonly oratory.
Rom. 15:5 Now the God of patience and consolation [paraklesis]
        grant you to be likeminded one toward another according to Christ Jesus:
Rom. 15:6 That ye may with one mind and one mouth
        glorify God, even the Father
        of our Lord Jesus Christ.
Rom. 15:7 Wherefore receive ye one another,
        as Christ also received us
        to the glory of God.
Rom. 15:8 Now I say that Jesus Christ
        was a minister of the circumcision for the truth of God,
       
to confirm the promises made unto the fathers:

Rom. 15:9 And that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy;
        as it is written, For this cause
        I will confess to thee among the Gentiles,  [outward]
        and sing unto thy name.                              [Inward]

Exomolog-eomai , II. later in Act., agree, consent, Ev.Luc.22.6:—Pass., exōmologēmenai apodeixeis agreed, admitted proofs,
2 Samuel 22.50 Therefore I will give thanks to you, Yahweh,
among the nations, Will sing praises to your name.
Latin: Confĭtĕor III. In eccl. writers, to confess, own, acknowledge: Christum, Prud. steph. 5, 40.— With dat.: “tibi, Domine,Vulg. Psa. 137, 1: “nomini tuo,id. ib. 141, 8.—Absol., Cypr. Ep. 15.—confessus ,

Psa. 137:1 By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion.
Psa. 137:2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof.

Eph. 4:32 And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted,
        forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.



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