Courtship of Inanna and Dumuzi

The Song of Solomon, like Sabbath (worship) and Tithe is Babylon etal.  Because of Instrumental-Trinitarian-Perverted Idolatry at Mount Sinai  [Exodus 32]  and affirmed by Paul [Romans 1] God turned both Israel and Judah over to worship the starry host (Acts 7 etal) and sentenced them to captivity and death back in their place of origin as robbers of caravans.


Rick.Marrs.Pepperdine.2017.Song.of.Solomon.html
SEE Sara.Barton.The.Song.of.Solomon
Laura Buffington SEX and SALVATION: the Song of Solomon or the Hieros Gamos.

The Hieros Gamos as the Song of Solomon has been a popular theme of those who are defined in Revelation 17-18 as the clergy of the return of the original Babylon Mother of Harlots at the right prophetic time at the last Jubilee and the Sabbath or Sixth time period.  This fits Genesis which defines the destruction of heaven and earth by the Sumerians close to the year B.C. 4000.  Using Sorcery as the term applied to the firtst harlot religion, John calls her ministers "lusted after fruits" also defined in Amos 8 when God says that He will never "pass by" them again.  As any religious craftsperson, speaker, singer or instrument player John calls them Sorcerers and says that THE WILL BE CAST ALIVE INTO THE LAKE OF FIRE.

Jerusalem is called SODOM and the Mother of Harlots: they were the Levite family "turned over to worship the starry host" and animal sacrifices which God did NOT command. (Isaiah 1; Jeremiah 7; Acts 7; etc)

God gave Israel Kings in His Anger and took them away in His anger because they were chosen to carry out the captivity and death sentence. The Christian Systen as the only Spiritual Covenant made by God to Abraham does not borrow anything from the periods of the Monarchy which was like the nations or Gentile.

Amos 5:25 Have ye offered unto me sacrifices and offerings in the wilderness forty years, O house of Israel?
Amos 5:26 BUT ye have borne the tabernacle of your Moloch and Chiun your images,
        the star of your god, which ye made to yourselves.

MolechFlame.jpg

 Amos 5:27 Therefore will I cause you to go into captivity beyond Damascus,
        saith the LORD, whose name is The God of hosts.

Amos 6:1 WOE to them that are at ease [opulenti] in Zion, and trust in the mountain of Samaria,
        which are named chief of the nations, to whom the house of Israel came

That means to Bible Students that the Jews WORSHIPPED that to which God ABANDONED them and any religionism beyond the School of Christ iin the Prophets and Apostles.

Dumuzi is Presented to Inanna
The Courtship of Inanna and Dumuzi
Dumuzid and Geshtin-ana
Dumuzid's Dream
Shumdunda Grass
Hullupu Tree
The Serpent: the singing and harp-playing prostitute. The priesthood were Levites which were an old infant burning priesthood in Egypt:

H3867 law-vaw' A primitive root; properly to twine, that is, (by implication) to unite, to remain; also to borrow (as a form of obligation) or (causatively) to lend:—abide with, borrow (-er), cleave, join (self), lend (-er).

H3878 lêvı̂y lay-vee' From H3867 ; attached; Levi, a son of Jacob:—Levi. See also H3879 , H3881 .
H3880 livyâh liv-yaw' From H3867 ; something attached, that is, a wreath:—ornament.
H3882 livyâthân liv-yaw-thawn' From H3867 ; a wreathed animal, that is, a serpent (especially the crocodile or some other large sea monster); figuratively the constellation of the dragon; also as a symbol of Babylon:—leviathan, mourning.

Faiths of Man: A Cyclopædia of Religions

The meaning of Levite we can find in the root word in Hebrew means “to join,” to “‘ bind ” (see Lui-than “snaky-monster “) and “joined” or “attached to”–see Genesis 29:34, and also Numbers 18:2, 4 (Hebrew text). This word, says Professor Goldziher, “is but an expanded form of Lui, a serpent,” just as nahash-than, the name applied to the Levitical brazen serpent of the temple, is of nahash, any oracular serpent, as that of Eden. The serpent Nehushtan (” snake monster”) was worshiped in the Jerusalem temple (2 Kings xviii, 4) with incense, and was traditionally said, about 726 B.C., to be the copper, or bronze, serpent-symbol made by Moses in the desert. Let us not forget that we now find in Freemasonry both Boaz and Jachin that are said to be two copper, brass or bronze pillars. Now you have a clue as to where we might find the Levites today.

2Kings 18:3 And he did that which was right in the sight of the LORD, according to all that David his father did.
2Kings 18:4 He removed the high places, and brake the images, and cut down the groves,
        and brake in pieces the brasen serpent that Moses had made:
        for unto those days the children of Israel did burn incense to it: and he called it Nehushtan.
h5175.Nachash.gif
h5172NachashUL.gif

Eve.Goddess.gif
Genesis 3:13 And the LORD God said unto the woman, What is this that thou hast done? And the woman said, The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat.

Serpo   B.Transf., of things, to move slowly or imperceptibly, to creep along, proceed gradually, bestia
II.Trop., to creep, crawl; to extend gradually or imperceptibly; to spread abroad, increase, prevail
per agmina murmur,(bestiascanam, sermones Repentes [sudden, not expected, bellum, religio, discordia, sonos] per humum
Of a low, grovelling poetic style: “(poëta) Serpit humi tutus,
căno , cĕcĭni, cantum (ancient I.imp. cante = canite,
once canituri,Vulg. Apoc. 8, 13  to utter melodious notes, to sing, sound, play.
tibicen  cithara, crowing of a cock: “galli victi silere solent, canere victores,to crow,
to practice magic, to charm, Galli is a word for a Catamite: priest of the Mother Godesses.

"Kenite" is a rendition of Hebrew קֵינִי Qeyniy. According to Gesenius, the name is derived from the name Cain (קַיִן Qayin).[5] According to A. H. Sayce, the name `Kenite', Qéní, is identical an Aramaic word meaning `a smith', which in its turn is a cognate of Hebrew Quayin, with the meaning `a lance'.[6]"

H7014 qayin kah'-yin The same as H7013 (with a play upon the affinity to H7069 ); Kajin, the name of the first child, also of a place in Palestine, and of an Oriental tribe:--Cain, Kenite (-s).
H7013
qayin kah'-yin From H6969 in the original sense of fixity; a lance (as striking fast): spear.

H6969 qun koon A primitive root; to strike a musical note, that is, chant or wail (at a funeral): lament, mourning woman.

agmina  troup, unbroken, in close ranks agmina
 
clāmor  applause căvus   concha,” “bucina war trumpet  b. = inanis, vain, empty: “gloria

pŏēta   a contriver, tricksterCic. de Or. 2, 46, 194: “oratores et poëtae,id. ib. 3, 10, 39: “versificator quam poëta melior poëtam in scenā nominatim

BEGUILED IS:   dē-cĭpĭo , capio, primarily signifies to catch away, catch up, seize an animal while running, fleeing,: “amatorem amicae decipiunt vitia,Hor . S. 1, 3, 38.— “bucina
Now Rhea, as Ceres, in Hymn XIV, is called 'brass-sounding' and
'drum-beating'
. This has reference to the mystical results of certain sounds and rhythm, part and parcel of what the Hindus call Mantravidyâ.Music and Mantras, therefore, were used by the Orphics to attract, or call down, the influence of the Mother of the Gods, who at the same time was the 'Store-house of Life', of Divine Nature. Thus Proclus in his Commentary on Euclid (ii) tells us that 'the Pole of the World is called by the Pythagoreans the Seal of Rhea' (Myst. Hymns, p. 63). THAT IS THE MARK OF ZOE

Lucretius (98 - c. 55 BC): The Worship of Cybele
Wherefore great Mother of gods, and Mother of beasts,
And parent of man hath she alone been named.
Her hymned the old and learned bards of Greece....
Do name Idaean , giving her

Escort of Phrygian bands, since first, they say,

From out those regions 'twas that grain began
Through all the world. To her do they assign
The Galli, the emasculate, since thus
They wish to show that men who violate
The majesty of the Mother and have proved
Ingrate to parents are to be adjudged
Unfit to give unto the shores of light

A living progeny. The Galli come:

And hollow cymbals, tight-skinned tambourines
Resound around to
bangings of their hands;
The fierce
horns threaten with a raucous bray;
The tubed pipe excites their maddened minds
In Phrygian measures; they bear before them knives,
Wild emblems of their frenzy, which have power
The rabble's ingrate heads and impious hearts
To panic with terror of the goddess' might.
Weeping for TammuzExcluded by Paul in Romans 14

INANNA (Inannu) (BM)

PRAYER OF ENHEDUANNA -ADORATION OF INANNA OF UR
Hullupu Tree
The ME, Inanna - Ea - Gift of Wisdom and Music
The Courtship of Inanna and Dumuzi BabCourtship.html
The Exhaltation of Inana BabInanaB.html
Inana's descent to the nether world J.A. Black etal.
Inanna Descent Wolkstein - Kramer

Inana and Enki

Inanna and Ebih
Dumuzi is Presented to Inanna
Inana and Shu-kale-tuda
Dumuzid and Geshtin-ana
The death of Dumuzi
Dumuzid's Dream
Hymn from Inanna to Tammuz
Hymn of Love from Inanna to Tammuz
Inanna and Bilulu

The Huluppu Tree
The brother spoke to his younger sister.
The Sun God, Utu, spoke to Inanna, saying:
        “Young Lady, the flax in its fullness is lovely.
    Inanna, the grain is glistening in the furrow.
    I will hoe it for you. I will bring it to you.
    A piece of linen, big or small, is always needed.
    Inanna, I will bring it to you.”

Inanna:
         “Brother, after you’ve brought me the flax,
          Who will comb it for me?”
Utu:
         “Sister, I will bring it to you combed.”

Inanna:
         “Utu, after you’ve brought it to me combed,
          Who will spin it for me?”
Utu:
    “Inanna I will bring it to you spun?”

Inanna:
         “Brother, after you’ve brought the flax to be spun,
         Who will braid it for me?”
Utu:
         “Sister, I will bring it to you braided.”

Inanna:
         “Utu, after you’ve brought it to me braided,
         Who will weave it for me?”
Utu:
         “Sister, I will bring it to you woven.”

Inanna:
         “Utu, after you’ve brought it to me woven,
         Who will bleach it for me?”
Utu:
         “Inanna, I will bring it to you bleached.”

Inanna:
         “Brother, after you’ve brought my bridal sheet to me,
          Who will go to bed with me?
          Utu, who will go to bed with me?”
Utu:
         “Sister, your bridegroom will go to bed with you.

    He who was born from a fertile womb,
    He who was conceived on the scared marriage throne,
    Dumuzi, the shepherd! He will go to bed with you.”

Inanna spoke:
         “No, brother
    The farmer! He is the man of my heart!
    He gathers the grain into great heaps.
    He brings the grain regularly into my storehouses.”

Utu spoke:
         “Sister, marry the shepherd.
    Why are you unwilling?
    His cream is good; his milk is good.

    Whatever he touches shines brightly.
    Inanna, marry Dumuzi.
    You who adorn yourself with the agate necklace of fertility,
    Why are you unwilling?
    Dumuzi will share his rich cream with you.
    You who are meant to be the kings protector,
    Why are you unwilling?”

Inanna spoke:
         “The shepherd? I will not marry the shepherd!
    His clothes are course; his wool is rough.
    I will marry the farmer.
    The farmer grows flax for my clothes,
    The farmer grows barley for my .”

Dumuzi spoke:
         “Why do you speak about the farmer?
    Why do you speak about him?
    If he gives you black flour’
    I will give you black wool.

    If he gives you white flour,
    I will give you white wool.
    If he gives you beer,
    I will give you sweet milk.
    If he gives you bread,
    I will give you honey cheese.

    I will give the farmer my leftover cream.
    I will give the farmer my leftover milk.
    Why do you speak about the farmer?
    What does he have more than I do?”

Inanna spoke:
         “Shepherd, without my mother, Ningal,
         you’d be driven away;
    without my grandmother, Ningikuga,
         you’d be driven into the steeps;
    without my father, Nanna, you’d have no roof;
    without my brother Utu&emdash;”

Dumuzi spoke:
         “Inanna, do not start a quarrel.
    My father, Enki, is as good as your father, Nanna.
    My mother, Sirtur, is as good as your mother, Ningal.
    My sister, Geshtinanna, is as good as yours.
    I am as good as your brother, Utu
    Queen of the palace, let us talk it over.”

The word they had spoken
Was a word of desire.
From the starting of the quarrel
Came the lovers desire.

The shepherd went to the royal house with cream.
Dumuzi went to the royal house with milk.
Before the door, he called out:
     “Open the house, My Lady, open the house!”

Inanna ran to [ask] Ningal, the mother who bore her.

Ningal counseled her daughter, saying:
         “My child, the young man will be you father.
    My daughter, the young man will be your mother.
    He will treat you like a father.
    He will care for you like a mother.
    Open the house, My Lady, open the house!”

Inanna, at her mothers command,
Bathed and anointed herself with scented oil.
She covered her body with the royal white robe.
She readied her dowry.
She arranged her precious lapis beads around her neck.
She took her seal in her hand.

Dumuzi waited expectantly.
Inanna opened the door for him.
Inside the house she shone before him.
Like the light of the moon.
Dumuzi looked at her joyously.
He pressed his neck close against hers.
He kissed her.

Inanna spoke:
         “What I tell you
    Let the singer weave into song.
    What I tell you,
    Let it flow from ear to mouth,
    Let it pass from old to young:

    My vulva, the horn,
    The Boat of Heaven,
    Is full of eagerness like the young moon.
    My untilled land lies fallow.
    As for me, Inanna,
    Who will plow my vulva?
    Who will plow my high field?
    Who will plow my wet ground?
    As for me, the young woman,
    Who will plow my vulva?
    Who will station the ox there?
    Who will plow my vulva?”

Most great churches, Catholic and Protestant, are defined as the womb of the mother church.  These images were once popular over the entrance doors so that you had to stroke her before you entered.  The clergy, Jewish and Christian were derived from women's garments and men like David was male but perform the role of the female. So-called "worship observations" to which Jesus said "the kingdom does not come" are performed by self-exhibition and talent acting the role of the mediator in song and sermon.  Religious musicians were known to be "drunk, perverted or just having fun" or mocking.  All of the elements of the Jewish priesthood including their falsetto was performing females.

Vulva.gif Vulva-Easthorp.jpg

When David went naked with the camp followers or servants while moving the Ark of the Covenant He was aroused by the singing, playing and dancing, stripped off the stola (a female garment) and was left with the Ephod. Faithful Michal said that he was NUDO.

Ephod.Vulva.gif

Phallic.Cross.Ephod.gif


God doesn't live in houses built by human hands. The temple or Church is a woman's womb and the entrance is the vulva.  These were once over the entrance to churches and you had to stroke the vulva to gain entrance.  That is why all religion is sexual and homosexual and why Jesus came to build a School of the Word or Regulative principle.

Hosea 4 and the end of the emasculated priesthood.

Hosea 10 and the pattern for musical worship teams: and Abomination word


Dumuzi replied:
         “Great Lady, the king will plow your vulva?
         I, Dumuzi the King, will plow your vulva.”

Inanna:
         “Then plow my vulva, man of my heart!
           Plow my vulva!”

At the king’s lap stood the rising cedar.
Grains grew high by their side.
Gardens flourished luxuriantly.

Inanna sang:
         “He has sprouted; he has burgeoned;
    He is lettuce planted by the water.
    He is the one my womb loves best.
    My well-stocked garden of the plain,
    My barley growing high in its furrow,
    My apple tree which bears fruit up to its crown,
    He is lettuce planted by the water.


Plants grew high by their side.     My honey-man, my honey-man sweetens me always.
    My lord, the honey-man of the gods,
    He is the one my womb loves best.
    His hand is honey, his foot is honey,
    He sweetens me always.
    My eager impetuous caresser of the navel,
    My caresser of the soft thighs,
    He is the one my womb loves best.
    He is letus planted by the water.”

Dumuzi sang:
         “O Lady, your breast is your field.
    Inanna, your breast is your field.
    Your broad field pours out the plants.
    Your broad field pours out grain.
    Water flows from on high for your servant.
    Bread flows from on high for your servant.
    Pour it out for me, Inanna.
    I will drink all you offer.”

Inanna sang:
         “Make your milk sweet and thick, my bridegroom.
    My shepherd, I will drink your fresh milk.
    Wild bull Dumuzi, make your milk sweet and thick.
    I will drink your fresh milk.
    Let the milk of the goat flow in my sheepfold.
    Fill my holy churn with honey cheese.
    Lord Dumuzi, I will drink your fresh milk.

    My husband, I will guard my sheepfold for you.
    I will watch over your house of life, the storehouse,
    The shining quivering place which delights Sumer&emdash;
    The house which decides the fates of the land,
    The house which gives the breath of life to the people.
    I, the queen of the palace, will watch over your house.”

Dumuzi spoke:
         “My sister, I would go with you to my garden.
    Inanna, I would go with you to my garden.
    I would go with you to my orchard.
    I would go with you to my apple tree.
    There I would plant the sweet, honey-covered seed.”

Inanna spoke:
         “He brought me into his garden.
    My brother, Dumuzi, brought me into his garden.
    I strolled with him among the standing trees,
    I stood with him among the fallen trees,
    By the apple tree I knelt as is proper.
    Before my brother coming in song,
    Who rose to me out of poplar leaves,
    Who came to me in the midday heat,
    Before my lord, Dumuzi,
         I poured out plants from my womb.
    I placed plants before him,
    I poured out plants before him.
    I placed grain before him,
    I poured out grain before him,
    I poured out grain before my womb.”

Inanna sang:
         “Last night as I, the queen, was shining bright,
    Last night as I, the Queen of Heaven, was shining bright,
    As I was shining bright and dancing,
    Singing praises at the coming of the night&emdash;
    He met me&emdash;he met me!
    My lord Dumuzi met me.
    He pushed his hand to my hand.
    He pressed his neck close against mine.

    My high priest is ready for the holy loins.
    My lord Dumuzi is ready for the holy loins.
    The plants and herbs in his field are ripe.
    O Dumuzi! You fullness is my delight!”

She called for it, she called for it, she called for the bed!
She called for the bed that rejoices the heart.
She called for the bed that sweetens the loins.
She called for the bed of kingship.
She called for the bed of queenship.

Inanna called for the bed:
         “Let the bed that rejoices the heart be prepared!
    Let the bed that sweetens the lions be prepared!
    Let the bed of kingship be prepared!
    Let the bed of queenship be prepared!
    Let the royal bed be prepared!”

Inanna spread the bridal sheet across the bed.

She called to the king:
         “The bed is ready!”
She called to her bridegroom:
         “The bed is waiting!”
He put his hand in her hand.
He put his hand to her heart.
Sweet is the sleep of the hand-to-hand.
Sweeter still is the sleep of heart-to-heart.

Inanna spoke:
         “I bathed for the wild bull,
    I bathed for the shepherd Dumuzi,
    I perfumed my sides with ointment,
    I coated my mouth with sweet-smelling amber,
    I painted my eyes with kohl.
    He shaped my loins with his fair hands.

    The shepherd Dumuzi filled my lap with cream and milk,
    He stroked my pubic hair,
    He watered my womb.
    He laid his hands on my holy vulva,
    He smoothed my black boat with cream,
    He quickened my narrow boat with milk,
    He caressed me on the bed.

    Now I will caress my high priest on the bed,
    I will caress the faithful shepherd Dumuzi,
    I will caress his loins, the shephership of the land,
    I will decree a sweet fate for him.”

The Queen of Heaven,
The heroic woman, greater than her mother,
Who was presented the me by Enki,

Inanna, the First Daughter of the Moon,
Decreed the fate of Dumuzi:
         “In battle I am you leader,
    In combat I am you armor-bearer
    In the assembly I am your advocate,
    On the campaign I am your inspiration.
    You, the chosen shepherd of the holy shrine,
    You, the king, the faithful provider of Uruk,
    You, the light of An’s great shrine,
In all ways you are fit:

         To hold you head high on the loft dais,
         To sit on the lapis lazuli throne,
         To cover you head with the holy crown,
         To wear long clothes on your body,
         To bind yourself with the garments of kingship,
         To carry the mace and sword,
         To guide straight the long bow and arrow,
         To fasten the throw-stick and sling at your side,
         To race on the road with the holy scepter in your hand,
         And the holy sandals on your feet,
         To prance on the holy breast like a lapis lazuli calf.

    You, the sprinter, the chosen shepherd,
    In all ways you are fit.
    May your heart enjoy long days.
    That which An has determined for you&emdash;may it not be altered.
    That which Enlil has granted&emdash;may it not be changed.
    You are the favorite of Ningal.
    Inanna holds you dear.”

Ninshubur, the faithful servant of the holy shrine of Uruk,
Led Dumuzi to the sweet thighs of Inanna and spoke:
         “My queen, here is the choice of your heart,
    the king, your beloved bridegroom.
    May he spend long days in the sweetness of your holy loins.
    Give him a favorable and glorious reign.
    Grant him the king’s throne, firm in its foundations.
    Grant him the shepherd’s staff of judgment.
    Grant him the enduring crown
         with the radiant and noble diadem.

    From where the sun rises to where the sun sets,
    From north to south,
    From the Upper Sea to the Lower Sea,
    From the land of the huluppu-tree to the land of the cedar,
    Let his shepherd’s staff protect all of Sumer and Akkad.

    As the farmer, let him make the fields fertile,
    As the shepherd, let him make the sheepfolds multiply,
    Under his reign let there be vegetation,
    Under his reign let there be rich grain.
    In the marshland may the fish and birds chatter,
    In the canebrake may the young and old reeds grow high,
    In the steppe may the deer and wild goats multiply,
    In the orchards may there be honey and wine,
    In the grasslands may the lettuce and cress grow high,
    In the palace may there be long life.

    May there be floodwater in the Tigris and Euphrates,
    May the plants grow high on their banks and fill the meadows,
    May the Lady of Vegetation pile the grain in heaps and mounds.
    O my Queen of Heaven and Earth,
    Queen of all the universe,
    May he enjoy long days in the sweetness of your lions.”

The king went with lifted head to the holy loin.
He went with lifted head to the loins of Inanna.
He went to the queen with lifted head.
He opened wide his arms to the holy priestess of heaven.

Inanna spoke:
         “My beloved, the delight of my eyes, met me.
    We rejoiced together.
    He took his pleasure of me.
    He brought me into his house.
    He laid me down on the fragrant honey-bed.

    My sweet love, lying by my heart,
    Tongue-playing, one by one,
    My fair Dumuzi did so fifty times.
    Now, my sweet loves is sated.

    Now he says:
          ‘Set me free, my sister, set me free.
         You will be a little daughter to my father.
         Come, my beloved sister, I would go to the palace.
         Set me free.’”

Inanna [continued]:
        “My blossom-bearer, your allure was sweet.
    My blossom-bearer in the apple orchard,
    My bearer of fruit in the apple orchard,
    Dumuzi-abzu, your allure was sweet.

    My fearless one,
    My holy statue,
    My statue outfitted with sword and lapis lazuli diadem,
         How sweet was you allure.”

 

The brother spoke to his younger sister.
The Sun God, Utu, spoke to Inanna, saying:
        “Young Lady, the flax in its fullness is lovely.
    Inanna, the grain is glistening in the furrow.
    I will hoe it for you. I will bring it to you.
    A piece of linen, big or small, is always needed.
    Inanna, I will bring it to you.”

Inanna:
         “Brother, after you’ve brought me the flax,
    Who will comb it for me?”
Utu:
         “Sister, I will bring it to you combed.”

Inanna:
         “Utu, after you’ve brought it to me combed,
    Who will spin it for me?”
Utu:
    “Inanna I will bring it to you spun?”

Inanna:
         “Brother, after you’ve brought the flax to be spun,
    Who will braid it for me?”
Utu:
         “Sister, I will bring it to you braided.”

Inanna:
         “Utu, after you’ve brought it to me braided,
    Who will weave it for me?”
Utu:
         “Sister, I will bring it to you woven.”

Inanna:
         “Utu, after you’ve brought it to me woven,
    Who will bleach it for me?”
Utu:
         “Inanna, I will bring it to you bleached.”

Inanna:
         “Brother, after you’ve brought my bridal sheet to me,
    Who will go to bed with me?
    Utu, who will go to bed with me?”
Utu:
         “Sister, your bridegroom will go to bed with you.

    He who was born from a fertile womb,
    He who was conceived on the scared marriage throne,
    Dumuzi, the shepherd! He will go to bed with you.”

Inanna spoke:
         “No, brother
    The farmer! He is the man of my heart!
    He gathers the grain into great heaps.
    He brings the grain regularly into my storehouses.”

Utu spoke:
         “Sister, marry the shepherd.
    Why are you unwilling?
    His cream is good; his milk is good.

    Whatever he touches shines brightly.
    Inanna, marry Dumuzi.
    You who adorn yourself with the agate necklace of fertility,
    Why are you unwilling?
    Dumuzi will share his rich cream with you.
    You who are meant to be the kings protector,
    Why are you unwilling?”

Inanna spoke:
         “The shepherd?I will not marry the shepherd!
    His clothes are course; his wool is rough.
    I will marry the farmer.
    The farmer grows flax for my clothes,
    The farmer grows barley for my .”

Dumuzi spoke:
         “Why do you speak about the farmer?
    Why do you speak about him?
    If he gives you black flour’
    I will give you black wool.

    If he gives you white flour,
    I will give you white wool.
    If he gives you beer,
    I will give you sweet milk.
    If he gives you bread,
    I will give you honey cheese.

    I will give the farmer my leftover cream.
    I will give the farmer my leftover milk.
    Why do you speak about the farmer?
    What does he have more than I do?”

Inanna spoke:
         “Shepherd, without my mother, Ningal,
         you’d be driven away;
    without my grandmother, Ningikuga,
         you’d be driven into the steeps;
    without my father, Nanna, you’d have no roof;
    without my brother Utu&emdash;”

Dumuzi spoke:
         “Inanna, do not start a quarrel.
    My father, Enki, is as good as your father, Nanna.
    My mother, Sirtur, is as good as your mother, Ningal.
    My sister, Geshtinanna, is as good as yours.
    I am as good as your brother, Utu
    Queen of the palace, let us talk it over.”

The word they had spoken
Was a word of desire.
From the starting of the quarrel
Came the lovers desire.

The shepherd went to the royal house with cream.
Dumuzi went to the royal house with milk.
Before the door, he called out:
     “Open the house, My Lady, open the house!”

Inanna ran to [ask] Ningal, the mother who bore her.

Ningal counseled her daughter, saying:
         “My child, the young man will be you father.
    My daughter, the young man will be your mother.
    He will treat you like a father.
    He will care for you like a mother.
    Open the house, My Lady, open the house!”

Inanna, at her mothers command,
Bathed and anointed herself with scented oil.
She covered her body with the royal white robe.
She readied her dowry.
She arranged her precious lapis beads around her neck.
She took her seal in her hand.

Dumuzi waited expectantly.
Inanna opened the door for him.
Inside the house she shone before him.
Like the light of the moon.
Dumuzi looked at her joyously.
He pressed his neck close against hers.
He kissed her.

Inanna spoke:
         “What I tell you
    Let the singer weave into song.
    What I tell you,
    Let it flow from ear to mouth,
    Let it pass from old to young:

    My vulva, the horn,
    The Boat of Heaven,
    Is full of eagerness like the young moon.
    My untilled land lies fallow.
    As for me, Inanna,
    Who will plow my vulva?
    Who will plow my high field?
    Who will plow my wet ground?
    As for me, the young woman,
    Who will plow my vulva?
    Who will station the ox there?
    Who will plow my vulva?”

Dumuzi replied:
         “Great Lady, the king will plow your vulva?
    I, Dumuzi the King, will plow your vulva.”

Inanna:
         “Then plow my vulva, man of my heart!
    Plow my vulva!”

At the king’s lap stood the rising cedar.
Plants grew high by their side.
Grains grew high by their side.
Gardens flourished luxuriantly.

Inanna sang:
         “He has sprouted; he has burgeoned;
    He is lettuce planted by the water.
    He is the one my womb loves best.
    My well-stocked garden of the plain,
    My barley growing high in its furrow,
    My apple tree which bears fruit up to its crown,
    He is lettuce planted by the water.

    My honey-man, my honey-man sweetens me always.
    My lord, the honey-man of the gods,
    He is the one my womb loves best.
    His hand is honey, his foot is honey,
    He sweetens me always.
    My eager impetuous caresser of the navel,
    My caresser of the soft thighs,
    He is the one my womb loves best.
    He is letus planted by the water.”

Dumuzi sang:
         “O Lady, your breast is your field.
    Inanna, your breast is your field.
    Your broad field pours out the plants.
    Your broad field pours out grain.
    Water flows from on high for your servant.
    Bread flows from on high for your servant.
    Pour it out for me, Inanna.
    I will drink all you offer.”

Inanna sang:
         “Make your milk sweet and thick, my bridegroom.
    My shepherd, I will drink your fresh milk.
    Wild bull Dumuzi, make your milk sweet and thick.
    I will drink your fresh milk.
    Let the milk of the goat flow in my sheepfold.
    Fill my holy churn with honey cheese.
    Lord Dumuzi, I will drink your fresh milk.

    My husband, I will guard my sheepfold for you.
    I will watch over your house of life, the storehouse,
    The shining quivering place which delights Sumer&emdash;
    The house which decides the fates of the land,
    The house which gives the breath of life to the people.
    I, the queen of the palace, will watch over your house.”

Dumuzi spoke:
         “My sister, I would go with you to my garden.
    Inanna, I would go with you to my garden.
    I would go with you to my orchard.
    I would go with you to my apple tree.
    There I would plant the sweet, honey-covered seed.”

Inanna spoke:
         “He brought me into his garden.
    My brother, Dumuzi, brought me into his garden.
    I strolled with him among the standing trees,
    I stood with him among the fallen trees,
    By the apple tree I knelt as is proper.
    Before my brother coming in song,
    Who rose to me out of poplar leaves,
    Who came to me in the midday heat,
    Before my lord, Dumuzi,
         I poured out plants from my womb.
    I placed plants before him,
    I poured out plants before him.
    I placed grain before him,
    I poured out grain before him,
    I poured out grain before my womb.”

Inanna sang:
         “Last night as I, the queen, was shining bright,
    Last night as I, the Queen of Heaven, was shining bright,
    As I was shining bright and dancing,
    Singing praises at the coming of the night&emdash;
    He met me&emdash;he met me!
    My lord Dumuzi met me.
    He pushed his hand to my hand.
    He pressed his neck close against mine.

    My high priest is ready for the holy loins.
    My lord Dumuzi is ready for the holy loins.
    The plants and herbs in his field are ripe.
    O Dumuzi! You fullness is my delight!”

She called for it, she called for it, she called for the bed!
She called for the bed that rejoices the heart.
She called for the bed that sweetens the loins.
She called for the bed of kingship.
She called for the bed of queenship.

Inanna called for the bed:
         “Let the bed that rejoices the heart be prepared!
    Let the bed that sweetens the lions be prepared!
    Let the bed of kingship be prepared!
    Let the bed of queenship be prepared!
    Let the royal bed be prepared!”

Inanna spread the bridal sheet across the bed.

She called to the king:
         “The bed is ready!”
She called to her bridegroom:
         “The bed is waiting!”
He put his hand in her hand.
He put his hand to her heart.
Sweet is the sleep of the hand-to-hand.
Sweeter still is the sleep of heart-to-heart.

Inanna spoke:
         “I bathed for the wild bull,
    I bathed for the shepherd Dumuzi,
    I perfumed my sides with ointment,
    I coated my mouth with sweet-smelling amber,
    I painted my eyes with kohl.
    He shaped my loins with his fair hands.

    The shepherd Dumuzi filled my lap with cream and milk,
    He stroked my pubic hair,
    He watered my womb.
    He laid his hands on my holy vulva,
    He smoothed my black boat with cream,
    He quickened my narrow boat with milk,
    He caressed me on the bed.

    Now I will caress my high priest on the bed,
    I will caress the faithful shepherd Dumuzi,
    I will caress his loins, the shephership of the land,
    I will decree a sweet fate for him.”

The Queen of Heaven,
The heroic woman, greater than her mother,
Who was presented the me by Enki,

Inanna, the First Daughter of the Moon,
Decreed the fate of Dumuzi:
         “In battle I am you leader,
    In combat I am you armor-bearer
    In the assembly I am your advocate,
    On the campaign I am your inspiration.
    You, the chosen shepherd of the holy shrine,
    You, the king, the faithful provider of Uruk,
    You, the light of An’s great shrine,
In all ways you are fit:

         To hold you head high on the loft dais,
         To sit on the lapis lazuli throne,
         To cover you head with the holy crown,
         To wear long clothes on your body,
         To bind yourself with the garments of kingship,
         To carry the mace and sword,
         To guide straight the long bow and arrow,
         To fasten the throw-stick and sling at your side,
         To race on the road with the holy scepter in your hand,
         And the holy sandals on your feet,
         To prance on the holy breast like a lapis lazuli calf.

    You, the sprinter, the chosen shepherd,
    In all ways you are fit.
    May your heart enjoy long days.
    That which An has determined for you&emdash;may it not be altered.
    That which Enlil has granted&emdash;may it not be changed.
    You are the favorite of Ningal.
    Inanna holds you dear.”

Ninshubur, the faithful servant of the holy shrine of Uruk,
Led Dumuzi to the sweet thighs of Inanna and spoke:
         “My queen, here is the choice of your heart,
    the king, your beloved bridegroom.
    May he spend long days in the sweetness of your holy loins.
    Give him a favorable and glorious reign.
    Grant him the king’s throne, firm in its foundations.
    Grant him the shepherd’s staff of judgment.
    Grant him the enduring crown
         with the radiant and noble diadem.

    From where the sun rises to where the sun sets,
    From north to south,
    From the Upper Sea to the Lower Sea,
    From the land of the huluppu-tree to the land of the cedar,
    Let his shepherd’s staff protect all of Sumer and Akkad.

    As the farmer, let him make the fields fertile,
    As the shepherd, let him make the sheepfolds multiply,
    Under his reign let there be vegetation,
    Under his reign let there be rich grain.
    In the marshland may the fish and birds chatter,
    In the canebrake may the young and old reeds grow high,
    In the steppe may the deer and wild goats multiply,
    In the orchards may there be honey and wine,
    In the grasslands may the lettuce and cress grow high,
    In the palace may there be long life.

    May there be floodwater in the Tigris and Euphrates,
    May the plants grow high on their banks and fill the meadows,
    May the Lady of Vegetation pile the grain in heaps and mounds.
    O my Queen of Heaven and Earth,
    Queen of all the universe,
    May he enjoy long days in the sweetness of your lions.”

The king went with lifted head to the holy loin.
He went with lifted head to the loins of Inanna.
He went to the queen with lifted head.
He opened wide his arms to the holy priestess of heaven.

Inanna spoke:
         “My beloved, the delight of my eyes, met me.
    We rejoiced together.
    He took his pleasure of me.
    He brought me into his house.
    He laid me down on the fragrant honey-bed.

    My sweet love, lying by my heart,
    Tongue-playing, one by one,
    My fair Dumuzi did so fifty times.
    Now, my sweet loves is sated.

    Now he says:
          ‘Set me free, my sister, set me free.
         You will be a little daughter to my father.
         Come, my beloved sister, I would go to the palace.
         Set me free.’”

Inanna [continued]:
        “My blossom-bearer, your allure was sweet.
    My blossom-bearer in the apple orchard,
    My bearer of fruit in the apple orchard,
    Dumuzi-abzu, your allure was sweet.

    My fearless one,
    My holy statue,
    My statue outfitted with sword and lapis lazuli diadem,
         How sweet was you allure.”

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Courtship.of.Inanna.and.Dumuzi.html