Al Maxey Josephus and John The Baptist

Al.Maxey.Josephus.and.John.The.Baptist refutes Josephus, Wuest and  C.E.Dorris

Al Maxey:
I firmly believe what Mark 1:4 suggests to us is: those who turn from their sin, and turn toward God in faith, are forgiven, and this great redemptive reality we give testimony to in baptism. Baptism itself is neither "for" repentance nor "for" remission; it is a loving response of those who are
now saved by grace through faith.

The same holds true of Peter's words in Acts 2:38" [Wuest's Word Studies from the Greek NT, vol. 1, p. 16].

Mark 1:4 John did baptize in the wilderness,
        and preach the baptism of [because of] repentance for [eis] the remission of sins.


Beyond ceremonial washing:

And corresponding to that, baptism now saves you--
         not the removal of dirt from the flesh,
        but an
appeal to God for a good conscience--
        through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, 1 Peter 3:21NAS

Baptism, which corresponds to this, now saves you, not as a removal of dirt from the body but as an appeal to God for a clear conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, 1 Peter 3:21RSV

That is what Jesus also taught although His disciples did the baptizing.  This was the prophetic promise of seeking for the tiny remnant of those who had not "bowed to Ball" still alive when Messiah came.  Those of faith under the law would be saved at baptism in a ceremonial sense. However, after the Kingdom of Christ was established the baptized disciples would receive A holy spirit or A good conscience so they could READ the text and HEAR the text when it was read. They were baptized into the Word or the School of Christ: how can one become a disciple of a Micro Biologist by simply believing that oen exists. They must enroll as a disciple and be accepted by the Master.

Grace or Faith Only follow is the source of denying all of the Spirit of God's connection with salvation to Baptism as atime and place to REQUEST A holy spirit or A good conscience. This gives us thee ability to read BLACK text on BROWN PAPER.

Saved or Salvation always demands the question: SAVED FROM WHAT?

Ephesians 2:2 Wherein in time past ye walked according to the course of this WORLD,
        according to the prince of the power of the air,
       
the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience:

Kosmos , ho,  natgural, II. ornament, decoration, esp. of women; “hieros k.”metaph., of ornaments of speech, such as epithetsto sing sweet songs of praise,
THIS IS WHAT SATAN HAD THE RIGHT TO OFFER JESUS
Hēdu^-melēs , A. sweet-singing, “khelidoiAnacr.67, cf. Sapph.122(Comp.), Pi.N.2.25; sweet-sounding, “xoanaS.Fr.238, etc.: poet. fem., “hēdumeleia surigxNonn.D.29.287.

Surigx , iggos, , A. shepherd's pipe, Panspipe2. cat-call, whistle, hiss, as in theatres, Id.Lg.700c; cf. “surizō11.2, surigmos:—the last part of the nomos Puthikos was called surigges, prob. because it imitated the dying hisses of the serpent Pytho, Str.9.3.10. 3. mouthpiece of the aulos,  

All Baptists effectively call Scripture a lie because they use the 'faith only' concept to HINDER those who are entering;
A.T. Robertson, the premier Baptist grammarian, argued this case in his famous work, Word Pictures in the New Testament (Nashville: Broadman, 1930, III, 35-36). In addition, J.R. Mantey contended for the “causal” sense of eis in Acts 2:38, though he classified that use of the preposition as a “remote meaning.”

His discussion clearly indicated, however, that he yielded to that view because of his conviction that, if baptism was “for the purpose of the remission of sins,” then salvation would be of works, and not by faith (a false conclusion) (see: H.E. Dana & J.R. Mantey, A Manual Grammar of the Greek New Testament, New York: Macmillan, 1955, 103-04). Those of the Baptist persuasion constantly appeal to Robertson and Mantey as authorities on this matter.
Wuest as Maxey's authority refutes by understanding that pistis includes TO COMPLY.

Al Maxey: Even Josephus, the Jewish historian, noted that the baptism of John was never intended to be redemptive, but rather reflective of inner realities. It was thus perceived, even by him, as a response instead of a sacrament.

That is Al Maxey's version of STRONG DELUSIONS for repudiating the Spirit OF Christ in the Prophets and by the direct command that one becomes a Disciple or a Christian by being baptized IN ORDER to continue being Christ's disciple. The TEXT BOOK of this Disciple Assembly with no roles and no doles is the Word or Logos: the Logos is God's Regulating or governing principle. Is is the OPPOSITE of rhetoric, self opinions or personal references, singing, playing instruments or acting.  Christ in Isaiah 4 said of those who do not speak the Word "THERE IS NO LIGHT IN THEM."

The Al Maxey quotation probably lifted from some Baptists or ANTI-baptism excuse..

Al Maxey:"Herod slew John, who was called the Baptist, who was a good man, and commanded the Jews to exercise virtue, both as to righteousness towards one another, and piety towards God, and so to come to baptism; for that the washing (with water) would be acceptable to Him, if they made use of it, not in order to the putting away (or remission) of some sins, but for the purification of the body: supposing still that the soul was thoroughly purified beforehand by righteousness" [Antiquities of the Jews, book 18, chapter 5, section 2].

Al also twists C.E.Dorris in the Lipscomb Commentary on John.  Dorris agrees with Josephus who was speaking of Jews who were baptized for the remission of sins which did not negate their ceremonial washings because Jesus had not died, ascended with the blood into the heavenly tabernacle and returned to the upper room to pour out the wind or breath:

Dorris in brackets amplifying Lipscomb [Of all this great world, and its sentient, teeming inhabitants, there was not one being who recognized him in his divine character as Creator of the universe and Redeemer of men.] 11 He came unto his own, and they that were his own received him not.- We have long thought "his own" referred 1: 11, 12.] JOHN 21 as many as received him, to them gave he the right to become children of to those prepared by John for him. They embraced a large portion of the Jewish nation, but only those who voluntarily took upon themselves the obligations by being baptized. This was a radical change in the order of God's dealings with the Jews

Hitherto those he recognized as his servants were born after the flesh. All that were born of the fleshly family of Jacob were his servants. Now the voluntary principle was introduced by John. None were his save those who through faith in John's teaching voluntarily took on themselves the obligations imposed in baptism. This principle introduced into the provisional and introductory stages of the kingdom was to be the distinguishing principle of God's government henceforth. Hence, these to whom Christ came were his own, prepared for him by John and they were born not of blood or the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God, inasmuch as they were begotten by the word of God preached through John

Mark speaks of the beginning of the gospel and launches into the baptism by John and Jesus through his disciples. Beginning is ARCHE which is the foundation or "Most important part" of a building. This agrees with Dorris.

Those who refuse to be baptized are apistos or "believeth nots." That means that they are in revolt against and are treacherous and betrayers.  Jesus came to seek and save a LITTLE FLOCK of lost spirits: He does not pray for the world or the massses of those not OF FAITH.  If you follow them to deny what Christ prophesied and Jesus commanded that despises the Word and is blasphemy.  This copy of Josephus undoubtedly came from some ANTI-baptizer.

SOME TRUE JOSEPHUS STRIPPED AND CHANGED TO DEFEND FALSE AND FATAL DOGMA

CCEL Ant-18. 2. Now some of the Jews thought that the destruction of Herod's army came from God, and that very justly, as a punishment of what he did against John, that was called the Baptist: for Herod slew him, who was a good man, and commanded the Jews to exercise virtue, both as to righteousness towards one another, and piety towards God, and so to come to baptism; for that the washing [with water] would be acceptable to him, if they made use of it, not in order to the putting away [or the remission] of some sins [only], but for the purification of the body; supposing still that the soul was thoroughly purified beforehand by righteousness. Now when [many] others came in crowds about him, for they were very greatly moved [or pleased] by hearing his words, Herod, who feared lest the great influence John had over the people might put it into his power and inclination to raise a rebellion, (for they seemed ready to do any thing he should advise,)

John's Baptism was effective during the Law of Moses but it did not result in A HOLY SPIRIT which was the future Christian's own spirit made clear by the Word or Covenant in their heart and not just on paper.

William Whiston, page  382

Josephus Antiquities XVIII.V 2. Now some of the Jews thought that the destruction of Herod's army came from God, and that very justly, as a punishment of what he did against John, that was called the Baptist: for Herod slew him,

who was a GOOD man, and commanded the Jews to exercise virtue,
        both as to [1] righteousness towards one another,
        and [2] piety towards God,
                and so to come to baptism;
                for that the washing [with water] would be acceptable to him,

IF they made use of it, not in order to the putting away [or the remission] of SOME sins [ONLY],
but
for the purification of the body
supposing still that the soul was thoroughly purified beforehand by righteousness.

After Jesus neither Jews, Gentiles or Swine are ceremonially impure: they are justified if they walk exactly as Josephus has defined. CORNELIUS was a righeous person: he believed in God and gave alms so much that God sent him a vision. However, Wuest misquoted by Al Maxey has more to say:

Acts 10:1 There was a certain man in Caesarea called Cornelius,
         a centurion of the band called the Italian band
Acts 10:2 A devout man, and one that feared God with all his house,
        which gave much alms to the people, and prayed to God alway.

Acts 10:4 And when he looked on him, he was afraid, and said,
        What is it, Lord? And he said unto him,
        Thy prayers and thine alms are come up for a memorial before God.
Acts 10:5 And now send men to Joppa, and call for one Simon, whose surname is Peter:
Acts 10:6 He lodgeth with one Simon a tanner, whose house is by the sea side:
        he shall tell thee what thou oughtest to do.

Acts 10:33 Immediately therefore I sent to thee; and thou hast well done that thou art come. Now therefore are we all here present before God, to hear all things that are commanded thee of God.
Acts 10:34  Then Peter opened his mouth, and said, Of a truth I perceive that God is no respecter of persons:
Acts 10:35 But in every nation he that feareth him, and worketh righteousness, is accepted [acceptable] with him.


Peter commanded Cornelius to BE BAPTIZED just as Jesus commanded.

Wuest216P

Through a vision, God instructed Peter to go to the houuse of Cornelius, a Gentile centurion.  After hearing about Cornelius' vision of an angel, Peter realized that God had sent him there to preach the gospel to Cornelius and his household.  While peter was speaking of Jesus Christ and the remission of sins through His name to Cornelius and those gathered at his house, the holy Spirit fell upon all who were listeing.. This clear sign from God dispeled any hesitation on Peter's part to baptize these Gentiles into Christ.

3. COMMENTARY

a. Salvation comes to the Gentiles.

The Holy Spirit fell on all who were listening just as it did on the apostles at Pentecost cf Acts 11:25, moving them to speak with tongues and magnify God. The circumcised believers who were there with Peter were astonished at such a clear bestowal of God's grace. This served as the final word from God that He accepted these Gentile believers.  If God had chosen them Peter reasoned, who could resist God and hinder them from being baptized with water?  Thus, Peter commanded them to be baptized.

b. The baptism of the converts.

The story of peter''s mission to C ornelius' house did not end with the bestoowal of the gift of the Holy Spirit on the Gentiles. Rather, the outpouring of the holy spirit led Peter to instruct them to be baptized with water.  It was only after they had been baptized that his divine mission was complete. This indicates the crucial and necessary role of water baptism in conversion.

Firstly, they were baptized "in the name of Jesus Christ." Through baptism, these believers were incorporated into Christ and His body.  It is worth noted that Peter's message

Al Maxey: The same holds true of Peter's words in Acts 2:38" [Wuest's Word Studies from the Greek NT, vol. 1, p. 16].

Wuest.217.jpg  

Peter concluded with the promise that whoever believed in Jesus Christ would receive the remissions of sins through His name (v43). This remissions of sins through the name of Jesus is effected when the believer is baptized in the name of Jesus Christ. It is also through baptism that the believer is united with Christ (Rom 6:3-l6) and brought into the fellowship of Christ's body (1Cor 12:13). That is why it was necessary for Cornelius and his relatives and friends to not only hear aboutJ esus Christ but also to be bap0tized in the name of Jesus.

Secondly, we observe from Cornelius' story that baptism with the holy Spirit does not replace baptism with wather. This contradicts the argument based on passages such as Matthew 3:11 that the baptism of the Spirit suplanted water baptism. Peter who happened to make reference to the baptism of the Holy Spirit in relation to Joh's baptism with water (Acts 11:16), deemed it necessary for these Gentiles to be baptized with water in the name of Jesus Christ even though they had received the g of the holy spirit. They still needed to be baptized because the remission of sins comes through baptism in the name of Jesus Christ (Acts 2:38)

Although Cornelius was a devout and God-Fearing man and his prayers were heard by God, his piety was not enough to save him.  Therefore, God sent Peter to preach the good news of Jesus Christ to him, by which Cornelius and his house owuld be saved (Acts 11:14). in order that they might believe in Jesus Christ and receive the remission of sins through hiis name.  Seeing that G
od poured out His Hooly Spirit even on the Gentiles , Petter commanded them to be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ. Thus, baptism with water in thename of Jesus Christ completed the conversion experience and accomplishes the purpose for which Peter had been sent--that Cornelius and his house may be saved.

The baptism of Cornelius was the connection point through which he wildolive branch wasgrafted into the  tree cfr.. Ro0m 1117-24).  Just as God added the Jewish converts to the church through baptism in the nameof jesus Christ Acts 2:38-41, He now also brought the Gentiles into the Church through baptism.

John's baptism was before the day of Pentecost and was not valid afterward. However, Josephus and The Spirit OF Christ affirm that:

Matt. 26:28 For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.

Only after the Great Commission did baptism continue to be for the remission of sins and the gift of A holy spirit as they were washed with water INTO the Word or Into the School of Christ.  John was searching for the promised tiny remnant: they would be marked by receiving the WORD and insist on being baptized without trying to weazle out of it.

Mark 1:4 John did baptize in the wilderness,
        and preach the baptism of [because of] repentance for the remission of sins.

Only baptism is our request for A holy spirit or A good conscience.  Faith only is never connected with remission of sins.

Luke 1:77 To give knowledge of salvation unto his people
        by the remission of their sins,

In 2 Corinthians 3 Paul said that until people are converted or baptized into Christ they cannot READ black text on white paper or when, by direct command, it is PREACHED by being READ:

Luke 3:3 And he came into all the country about Jordan,
        preaching the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins;

John preached BAPTISM of those who REPENTED and it was for or EIS the remission of sins.  Of the Jews who believed Peter commanded REPENTANCE and BAPSISM with the result of remission of sins and receiving A holy spirit which had meaning only in connection with the remission of their UNHOLY spirit or MIND.

For the righteous people in Joshephus' example, repentance simply means to change direction. Repentance turns toward God and baptism is INTO Christ.  The Jews refused to change their direction.

Luke 24:47 And that repentance and remission of sins
        should be preached in his name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem.
Acts 2:38 Then Peter said unto them,
        Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins,
        and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.  [A holy spirit or A good conscience]

Al Maxey: We could certainly quibble with some of the statements of Josephus, but the important thing about this statement is that it comes from a Jew who lived during the first century, and who expressed what was likely a commonly held understanding of John's baptism: that it was not for the purpose of forgiving sins, but rather reflective of that greater reality.

MARK REBUKES:
Mark 1:4 John did baptize in the wilderness,
        and preach the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins.

Josephus Affirms:  IF they made use of it, not in order to the putting away [or the remission] of SOME sins [ONLY],
                    BUT
for the purification of the body

This served for the remission of sins even as Christ ordained in Isaiah 1. Under the Law it also served for the ceremonial purification of the body.

Josephus and those who understand justification or being ceremonially pure.  Purification of the body was under the Law: however, the baptism he and Jesus preached also included "putting away or remission of some sins."

They were ceremonially QUALIFIED to be baptized FOR the remission of sins because

They exercised virtue, 1] righteousness towards one another, and [2] piety towards God,

Al Maxey:  "Thus, we have here the import of water baptism. Submission to this rite is the testimony of the person to the fact that he has been saved. ...

Saved always means SAFE.  The Jews or Gentiles who were devoted to God and worked righteeous deeds was acceptable to God

Wouldn't a dirty man dipped into the water BECAUSE he was already clean qualify as "strongly deluded"?

Al Maxey may have spiritual dislexia? Here is what he sees on paper:

Acts 2:38 Then Peter said unto them, Repent, AND be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ [BECAUSE OF] the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.

A holy spirit is OUR Spirit (Campbell, Scott) which becomes holy when our "sins are washed away" according to Jesus as Spirit to Paul.  Al etal may be premature and think about heaven or hell. However, baptism is washing of water into the Word or into the school of Christ. Jesus will not let us read BLACK text on BROWN paper until we have converted or been baptized.

NOW, All says that we must REPENT Because of the remission of sins.

Al Maxey says that Peter was a liar.  Christian baptism goes beyond to CLEANSE THE SPIRIT.

And corresponding to that, baptism now saves you-- not the removal of dirt from the flesh, but an appeal to God for a good conscience-- through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, 1 Peter 3:21NAS

Baptism, which corresponds to this, now saves you, not as a removal of dirt from the body but as an appeal to God for a clear conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, 1 Peter 3:21RSV

1 Pet. 3:20 Which sometime were disobedient,
        when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah,
        while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is,
        eight souls were saved by water.

The Flood where Ark means "coffin" covered with blood-red bitumen was the TYPE or TUPOS. A  Type is a PATTERN intended to be imitated.  Baptism was NOT a type.l

1 Pet. 3:21 The like figure (Antitupon or Antitype counterpart) whereunto
        even BAPTISM DOETH ALSO NOW SAVE US
        (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh,
        but the answer of [Appeal FOR] a good conscience toward God,)
        by the resurrection of Jesus Christ:

But God be thanked, that ye were the servants of sin,
        but ye have
obeyed from the heart that form (tupos a model for imitation) of doctrine
        which was delivered you. Ro 6:17
But now being
        made free from sin, and
        become servants to God, ye
        have your fruit unto holiness, and
        the end everlasting life. Ro 6:22

2 Thess 3:9 Not because we have not power,
but to
make ourselves an ensample unto you to follow us.

A holy spirit (ours) is a result of baptism which Jesus says "washes away sins." The same Peter said that BAPTISM SAVES US because that is the Jesus-ordained method of REQUESTING the remission of sins. Only those can read BLACK text on BROWN paper:


Heb. 10:1 For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually make the comers thereunto perfect.
Heb. 10:2 For then would they not have ceased to be offered? because that the worshippers once purged should have had no more conscience of sins.
Heb. 10:3 But in those sacrifices there is a remembrance again made of sins every year.

Anti (g473) an-tee'; a prim. particle; opposite, i.e. INSTEAD or because of (rarely in addition to): - for, in the room of. Often used in composition to denote contrast, requital, SUBSTITUTION, correspondence, etc.

  1. We are baptized by GRACE instead of having to build an Ark or drown
  2. We are baptized by GRACE instead of having to cross the Red Sea or be destroyed by FAITH ONLY when God said "Quit whining, lift up your arm and MOVE into the jaws of death.
  3. We are baptized by GRACE instead of having to be pinned on a stake and shed OUR blood.

When you have to EXPLAIN AWAY what the text MAKES CLEAR you may have exhausted God's Grace.

Tupos (g51) too'-pos; from 5180; a die (as struck), i.e. (by impl.) a stamp or scar; by anal. a shape, i.e. a statue, (fig.) style or resemblance; spec. a sampler ("type"), i.e. a model (for imitation) or instance (for warning): - en- (ex-) ample, fashion, figure, form, manner, pattern, print.

But, that would call all who came before Al liars. EIS means INTO the remission of Sins.  If God was not ignorant as claimed by the the APISTOS or the believeth nots.  Even simple simon would have used the Greek HOTI maning BECAUSE of.

Acts 2:38 Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ
        for the remission of sins,
        and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.

Al Maxey: Therefore, remission of sins cannot be the result of baptism, but rather its occasion. Baptism is the believer's testimony to the fact that his sins are remitted" [Dr. Kenneth S. Wuest, "Wuest's Word Studies from the Greek NT," vol. 1, p. 17-18].

Maxey probably lifted this data. It is not uncommon for people lusting to deny Scripture to REVERSE the charges. Wuest is speaking of those who MISUSE Scripture

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3. Commentary
a. For the remission of sins

In response to the question "what shall we do" Peter replied, repent and be baptized for the remission of sins vv 37,38.  Few other passages in the Bible state as clearly and directly that the purpose and effect of baptism is for the remission of sins.

The meaninng of the preposition, eis,l, with the substantative or accusative noun, as in the case here with "remission", denotes the direction of an action to a specific end." Hence the phrase is understood "for the purpose of the remission of sins." It is clear how the preposition is used in such passages as Matthew 26:28: "For this is my blood of the new covenant which is shed for (eis) the remission of sins." It should be beyond doubt that the blood of the Lord Jesus was shed for the purpose of the remission of sins.

A common argument cites the use of eis in the sense of "because of" or "in view of." It is true that this preposition is occasionaly thus used, e.g.. "He did not waver at (eis, because of) thepromise of God " (Romans 4:20). According to the argument of those who reject baptism as a condition for the remission of sins, a person is baptized because his sins have been forgiven or in view of the fact that the remission of sins has already taken place.  Baptism has no effect in the remission of sins

(Wuest206) but is only a declaration of a reality that has  already occurred. Repentence is what results in the remission of sins.

However the Greek text does not warrant such an interpretation "remission of your sins" is a phrase goverened by the noun "remission." As a noun, the word gives no indication of time. Even if the preposition were translated as "because of" the verse gives no indication that the remission of sins takes place prior to baptism. Thus, to sway thatPeter directed the people to be baptized because their sin had been forgiven would be adding to the meaning of the text. If we choose to infer that eis denotes the reason to be baptized, it is more accuracte to understand that Peter's worsas"reent and be baptized in view of the fact that yiou need the remission of sins."

Besides semantic considerations, the context also makes baptism a requirement for the remission of sins. Being convicted of their sinsand theirneed for forgiveness, the multitude asked the apostles, "What shall we do." A response that states Repent and be baptized BECAUSE your sins have been forgiven" would not have answered the wuestion of what to do to receive forgiveness.

If we removed the words "and be baptized" so that the verse reads "Repent for the remission of sins," few would contest the interpretation that repentance is a condition for the remission of sins.  A person who does not reent would not receive the reemission of sins.  Applying the samerule here, "be baptized for the remission of sins' means that baptism is a condition for the remission of sins.  If, in Peter's mind, baptism were merely a declaration of the remission of sincs achieved through repentance alone, he could have said Repent for the remission of sins and be baptized." Therefore the most natural readingof "repent and be baptized for the remission of sins" is that repentance and baptism are both required for the remission of sins
.

b. Baptism and repentance

Repentance and baptism go hand in hand because both are required for the remission of sins.  Repentance involves the turning of a person, both in heart and conduct away from

Wuest 207 sin and toward God. Prior to the ascension of Christ and the descent of the Holy Spirit, repentance was the condition for forgiveness. But because Christ has sacrificed Himself as atonement and shed His blood for redemption, repentance must now be coupled with baptism, for it is through the washing of water by the word that the blood of Christ cleanses all sinc (cf Acts 22:16; Ephes 5:25-27). On the other hand, baptism needs to be accompanied by a resolve to turn away from sin. Hence, Peter exhorted the converts to "be saved from the perverse generation"(Acts 2:40)
.
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-=Wuest page 79

Sacraments also have internal characteristics.  Sacraments are unique in that those who receive them through faith experience the spiritual effects promised by the Lord. Thus, for example, baptism is not merily a symbol that points to a reality apart from the ritual itself.  Those who receive baptism through faith enter into a saving relationship with Christ and the effect of remission of sins take place through the act of baptizing.  This spiritual reality is the work of God.

Wuest166.jpg Mark:16

Wuest166
It is not our present task to determine the canonicity of this passsage. Regardless of its canonicity, the passages conclusion concerning baptism is entirely consistent with other baptismal passages. Therefore, the question of its canonicity does not detract from what other parts of the Scriptures state about baptism.  We will proceed on the assumption that the text is original and examine how it supports the necessity of baptism.

b. Baptism and faith

When offering the promise of salvation, the Lord speaks of the necessity of faith and baptism. Faith and baptism are so closely connected that they are insepparable.  In Greek, a single definite article ("the one who") groups "believes" and "is baptized" together.  Thus "he that believes and is baptized is one unit.  As far as the Lord Jesus is concerned, there are only two with respect to their response to the gospel: those who believfe and are baptized and those who do not believe  The first category consists of believers and the latter unbelievers.  Believing the Lord Jesus but not receiving baptism is not one of the options.  Faith underlies baptism, and baptism follows faith.  A person who receives baptism must also accept the Lord Jesus Christ with faith in order to be saved.  On the other hand, a person who has faith in jesus Christ ought to be baptized into Christ.

The pairing of faith and baptism is evident in the New Teaching about baptism  Gal 3:26; Col 2:11-12..

Wuest167.jpg  Mark 16

and in the examples in Acts (acts 2:36-38; 20:42-48; 16:29-33; 19:4-5).  Furthermore, the gifts of grace received through faith, such as forgiveness of sins, justification, sanctification, regeneration, union with Christ, and being sons of God, are also received through baptism.  Therefore, it is not surprising to see that baptism is here linked so intimately with faith as a prerequisite for salvation.
c. Baptism is necessary for salvation..

The two conditions for salvation are faith and baptism.  Thus, thetwo verses state that "he that believes AND is baptized (v. 166) will be savede.  to receive salvation, it is necessary to believe and be baptized.

The second part of the condition--baptism--has often been treated as a non-requirement by those who view believe as the only condition for salvation.  According to this view, baptism is only a public demonstration of belief and has no saving effect.  Adherents of this view often cite the second portion of verse 16: "but he who does not believe will be condemned."  The rationale is that since unbelief is the only condition for condemnation, whether a person is baptized determines neither his salvation nor his condemnation.

To respond to such an interpretation, we need to first understand why baptism is not included in the second part of this verse.  Since faith and baptism are intimately connected, receiving baptism presupposes blief.  Belief on the othr hand, necessarily precedes baptism and prepares one to be baptized.. Stating "he who does not believed and is not baptized" would be redundant.  If one does not believe in the first place, the necessity of baptism would be irrelevant, and he standds condemned already.  Tis is why the second half of the verse only mentions the first part of the condition (belief) that would logically precedethe next (baptism).

The fact that baptism is out of the question for a person who does not believe once again highlights the cose conjunciton of faith and baptism.  Without faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, there is no baptism to speak of.  Therefore, the omission of baptism.

Wuest p. 215

I. Key Points:

a. God chose Cornelius and his household through divine revelations and the bestowal of the Holy Spirit
b Petter commanded the converts to be baptized showing that
        i. Baptism with water in the name of jesus Christ is necessary for the remissioon of sins and for salvation.
        ii. Receiving the Holy Spitit does not replace the need for water baptism.

i. Setting
        The converson of Cornelius was pivotal tothe expansion of the early church.. I was a major brekthrouggh because God directed Peter, a leading apostle, to carry the gospel of salvation beyond jewish boundaries to the Gentiles.  This was something unthinkable for the Jews at the time

Wuest216P.jpg

Through a vision, God instructed Peter to go to the houuse of Cornelius, a Gentile centurion.  After hearing about Cornelius' vision of an angel, Peter realized that God had sent him there to preach the gospel to Cornelius and his household.  While peter was speaking of Jesus Christ and the remission of sins through His name to Cornelius and those gathered at his house, the holy Spirit fell upon all who were listeing.. This clear sign from God dispeled any hesitation on Peter's part to baptize these Gentiles into Christ.

3. COMMENTARY

a. Salvation comes to the Gentiles.

The Holy Spirit fell on all who were listening just as it did on the apostles at Pentecost cf Acts 11:25, moving them to speak with tongues and magnify God. The circumcised believers who were there with Peter were astonished at such a clear bestowal of God's grace. This served as the final word from God that He accepted these Gentile believers.  If God had chosen them Peter reasoned, who could resist God and hinder them from being baptized with water?  Thus, Peter commanded them to be baptized.

b. The baptism of the converts.

The story of peter''s mission to C ornelius' house did not end with the bestoowal of the gift of the Holy Spirit on the Gentiles. Rather, the outpouring of the holy spirit led Peter to instruct them to be baptized with water.  It was only after they had been baptized that his divine mission was complete. This indicates the crucial and necessary role of water baptism in conversion.

Firstly, they were baptized "in the name of Jesus Christ." Through baptism, these believers were incorporated into Christ and His body.  It is worth noted that Peter's message

Wuest.217.jpg  Peter----

"Peter concluded with the promise that whoever believed in Jesus Christ would receive the remissions of sins through His name (v43). This remissions of sins through the name of Jesus is effected when the believer is baptized in the name of Jesus Christ. It is also through baptism that the believer is united with Christ (Rom 6:3-l6) and brought into the fellowship of Christ's body (1Cor 12:13). That is why it was necessary for Cornelius and his relatives and friends to not only hear aboutJesus Christ but also to be bap0tized in the name of Jesus.

Secondly, we observe from Cornelius' story that baptism with the hOly Spirit does not replace baptism with wather. This contradicts the argument based on passages such as Matthew 3:11 that the baptism of the Spirit supplanted water baptism. Peter who happened to make reference to the baptism of the Holy Spirit in relation to Joh's baptism with watter (Acts 11:16), deemed it necessary for these Gentiles to be baptized with water in the name of jesus Christ even though they had received the giift of the holy spirit. They still needed to be baptized because the remission of sins comes through baptism in the name of Jesus Christ (Acts 2:13)

Although Cornelius was a devout and God-Fearing man and his prayers were heard by God, his piety was not enough to save him.  Thereefore, God sent Peter to preach the good news of Jesus Christ to him, by which Cornelius and his house owuld be saved Acts 11:14 in order that they might believe in Jesus Christ and receive the remission of sins through hiis name.  Seeing that God poured out His Holy Spirit even on the Gentiles , Petter commanded them to be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ. Thus, baptism with water in thename of Jesus Christ completed the conversion experience and accomplishes the purpose for which Peter had been sent--that Cornelius and his house may be saved.

The baptism of Cornelius was the connection point through which he wildolive branch wasgrafted into the  tree cfr.. Ro0m 1117-24).  Just as God added the Jewish converts to the church through baptism in the nameof jesus Christ Acts 2:38-41, He now also brought the Gentiles into the Church through baptism.


Al Maxey:
Thus, "God's direct response to true repentance is forgiveness" [The Expositor's Bible Commentary, vol. 8, p. 620], and man's response to God's gift is to daily devote our lives to His will to the best of our ability, understanding and opportunity.

Acts 2  St. Peter and the other eleven Apostles shared these natural ideas and expectations till the Spirit was poured out, when they learned in a profounder spiritual comprehension to estimate aright the scope and meaning of our blessed Lord’s teaching. St. Peter dwells, therefore, in his sermon on Christ’s person, His sufferings, His resurrection, His ascension, no longer indeed for the purpose of exalting the Jewish nation, or predicting its triumph, but to point a purely spiritual lesson. "Repent ye, and be baptised every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ unto the remission of your sins; and ye shall receive"-not honour, riches, temporal freedom, but "ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost." The subject-matter of St. Peter’s sermon, the change in his tone of teaching, is another great proof of a supernatural force and power imparted on the Day of Pentecost.

The preaching of the New Testament is ever the same. John the Baptist came, and his teaching was briefly summed up thus, "Repent ye, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand." John was removed, and Christ came. The light ceased to shine, and then the true light stood revealed; but the teaching was the same, and the Messiah still proclaims, "Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand." The system of teaching to which I refer parries the force of our Lord’s example, as well as of the Baptist’s words, by saying, that was the old dispensation. Till Christ died, the new covenant did not come into force, and therefore Christ taught in His public ministry merely as a Jew, speaking on Jewish grounds to Jews. But let us see whether such an explanation, which makes void our Lord’s personal teachings and commands, is tenable. A reference, to this passage sufficiently settles this point. The Master departs and the Spirit is outpoured, and still the apostolic and inspired teaching is just the same. The cry of the multitude, "Men and brethren, what shall we do?" produces, from the illuminated Apostle, the same response, "Repent," coupled with a new requirement, "Be baptised, every one of you, for the remission of sins." And the same message has ever since continued to be the basis of all real spiritual work


Paul in Romans 6 says that we CANNOT serve God until we OBEY and be baptized, THEN being free from sin we can serve God.

Al Maxey says that Jesus was a liar:
John 3:3 Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee,
        Except a man be born again, he cannot SEE the kingdom of God.
John 3:4 Nicodemus saith unto him,
        How can a man be born when he is old?
        can he enter the second time into his mother’s womb, and be born?
John 3:5 Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee,
        Except a man be born [again] of water and of the Spirit,
        he cannot ENTER into the kingdom of God.  

Coffman: This is baptism according to Origen, Chrysostom, Augustine, Cyril,Beda, Theophylact, Euthymius, in the commentaries on this place (John 3:5), along with Justin Martyr, Tertullian, Ambrose, Hierome, Basil, Gregory,Nyssen, and many more, yea most of theFathers -

Acts 2:38 Then Peter said unto them,
        Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ
        for the remission of sins,
        and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.the Holy Spirit.

Receiving A new or holy spirit means that we are BORN AGAIN after obedience. No disciple will even try to do an end run:

Acts 2:41 Then they that gladly received his word were baptized:
        and the same day there were added unto them about three thousand souls.
 Acts 2:47 praising God, and having favor with all the people.
        And the Lord added to them day by day those that were saved.

1Peter 1:22 Seeing ye have purified your souls

        in obeying the truth [God's Word is Truth]
        THROUGH the Spirit
        unto unfeigned love of the brethren,
        see that ye love one another with a pure heart fervently:

1Peter 1:23 Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible,
        by the word [logos] of God, which liveth and abideth for ever.

Jesus said My WORDS are SPIRIT (John 6:63). That is because the Father "breathed" and the Son articulated that breath into WORDS.

logos , verbal noun of legō
Opposite kata pathos, or personal experiences
     Aristot. Nic. Eth. 1169a.1 Hence the good man will be a lover of self in the fullest degree, though in another sense than the lover of self so-called by way of reproach, from whom he differs as much as living by principle differs from living by passion, and aiming at what is noble from aiming at what seems expedient
Opposite mēte logō mēte ergō neither by reasoning nor by experience,
Opposite mentally conceived,
Opposite
. sensibly perceived,
Opposite Epagoge  2. bringing in to one's aid, introduction, incantation, spell,
       b. esp. in the Logic of Aristotle, argument by induction
Opposite proimion  A. opening, introduction; in Music, prelude, overture, Pi.P.1.4;
                  II.  hymn or short poem, such as those attributed to Homer, “Apollōnos
Opposite. phōnē, 3. any articulate sound, opp. inarticulate noise
                   4. of sounds made by inanimate objects, “aulōn ,
                       organōn  [3. musical instrument,] salpiggos
prose, Opposite. poiēsis, Id.R.390a; opp. psilometria, Arist.Po.1448a11;
Opposite. emmetra,
Opposite. poiētikē, D.H.Comp


1Peter 1:25 But the word of the Lord endureth for ever.  
[Through] And this is the word which by the gospel is preached unto you.

That makes Paul a liar:

Rom. 6:2 God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein?
Rom. 6:3 Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death?
Rom. 6:4 Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death:
        that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father,
        even so we also should walk in newness of life.
Rom. 6:5 For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death,
        we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection:
Rom. 6:6 Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him,
         that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.
Rom. 6:7 For he that is dead is freed from sin.
Rom. 6:8 Now if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with him:
Rom. 6:9 Knowing that Christ being raised from the dead dieth no more; death hath no more dominion over him.
Rom. 6:10 For in that he died, he died unto sin once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God.
Rom. 6:11 Likewise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Rom. 6:12 Let not sin therefore reign in your mortal body, that ye should obey it in the lusts thereof.
Rom. 6:13 Neither yield ye your members as instruments of unrighteousness unto sin: but yield yourselves unto God, as those that are alive from the dead, and your members as instruments of righteousness unto God.
Rom. 6:14 For sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace.
Rom. 6:15 What then? shall we sin, because we are not under the law, but under grace? God forbid.
Rom. 6:16 Know ye not, that to whom ye yield yourselves servants to obey,
         his servants ye are to whom ye obey; whether of sin unto death,
        or of obedience unto righteousness?
Rom. 6:17 But God be thanked, that ye were the servants of sin,
        but ye have obeyed from the heart that form of doctrine which was delivered you.
Rom. 6:18 Being then made free from sin, ye became the servants of righteousness.

Romans 6:[16] nescitis quoniam cui exhibetis vos servos ad oboediendum servi estis eius cui oboeditis sive peccati sive oboeditionis ad iustitiam

ad , . (from the fourth century after Christ written also at ; 2.  The point or goal at which any thing arrives.
(a).   With verbs which designate going, coming, moving, bearing, bringing near, adapting, taking, receiving, calling, exciting, admonishing, etc.,
b.  The terminus, with ref. to the space traversed, to, even t

Acts 10:17 Now while Peter doubted in himself what this vision which he had seen should mean, behold, the men which were sent from Cornelius had made inquiry for Simon’s house, and stood before the gate,

a.  At the end, finally, at last.
(a). Of place, at the extremity, extreme point, top, etc.: “missile telum hastili abiegno et cetera tereti, praeterquam ad extremum, unde ferrum exstabat,Liv. 21, 8, 10.—

a. To, toward: affero, accurro, accipio (to one's self).—
b. At, by: astare, adesse.—
c.  On, upon, against: accumbo, attero.—
d.  Up (cf. de- = down, as in deicio, decĭdo): attollo, ascendo, adsurgo.—
2. Fig.
a. To: adjudico, adsentior.—
b. At or on: admiror, adludo.—
c. Denoting conformity to, or comparison with: affiguro, adaequo.—
d. Denoting addition, increase (cf. ab, de, and ex as prefixes to denote privation): addoceo, adposco.—
e. Hence, denoting intensity: adamo, adimpleo, aduro, and perhaps agnosco.—
f. Denoting the coming to an act or state, and hence commencement: addubito, addormio, adquiesco, adlubesco, advesperascit. See more upon this word in Hand, Turs. I. pp. 74-134.
Rom. 6:17 But God be thanked, that ye were the servants of sin, but ye have obeyed from the heart that form of doctrine which was delivered you.

Romans 6.[17] gratias autem Deo quod fuistis servi peccati oboedistis autem ex corde in eam formam doctrinae in qua traditi estis
Oboedio
II. Esp.
A. Prop., of living beings (class.). obediently, willingly, readily
1. To obey, yield obedience to. to be subject to, to serve (freq. and class.; cf.: pareo, obtempero, obsequor).
B. Meton., of things, to yield, be manageable:  yielding, flexible,

Liv. 25 38 nor the commonwealth to remain unrevenged; enjoining me also to follow their discipline and their plans; [7] and desiring that as there was no one more obedient to their commands while they were alive than I, so after their death I would consider that conduct as best, which I might have the strongest reason for believing they would have adopted in each case.

You cannot BELIEVE and OBEY a FORM or PATTERN.

Forma
2.  An outline, plan, design (of an architect, etc.)
3. A model after which any thing is made, a pattern, stamp, last (of a shoemaker), etc.: “utendum plane sermone, ut numo, cui publica forma est,Quint. 1, 6, 3:
4. A mould which gives form to something: “(caseus) vel manu figuratur vel buxeis formis exprimitur,

Doctrina I. teaching, instruction (class.; cf.: litterae, artes, disciplina, praecepta, scientia, humanitas).

Trado I. v. infra; cf. Neue, Formenl. 2, 734), dĭdi, dĭtum, 3 (in tmesi: transque dato endoque plorato, i. e. tradito et implorato, Vet. Lex ap. Fest. s. v. sub vos, p. 309 Müll.), v. a. trans-do, to give up, hand over, deliver, transmit, surrender, consign (syn.: dedo, remitto).
B. In partic.
1. Pregn., to deliver, commit, intrust, confide for shelter, protection, imprisonment, etc. (syn.: commendo, committo).

Stŭdĭum , ii, n. studeo,
I. a busying one's self about or application to a thing; assiduity, zeal, eagerness, fondness, inclination, desire, exertion, endeavor, study: stu dium est animi assidua et vehemens ad aliquam rem applicata magnā cum voluntate occupatio, ut philosophiae, poëticae, geometriae, litterarum, Cic. Inv. 1, 25, 36.—
B. Application to learning or studying, study; in the plur., studies doctrinae,
Rom. 6:18 Being then made free from sin, ye became the servants of righteousness.
Libero release from slavery.
(a). With ab: “teque item ab eo vindico ac libero,Cic. Q. Fr. 3, 1: “se a Venere,to release one's self from one's duty to Venus, id. Div. in Caecil. 17, 53.—
B. n partic.
1. To absolve or acquit in a court of justice (syn.: “absolvo, solvo): aliquem, opp. condemnare,Cic. Clu. 22, 60: “aliquem crimine aliquo,Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 29, § 71: liberatur Milo, non eo consilio profectus esse, is acquitted of the charge of having undertaken a journey with the design,
Fab. 257: “angustias freti,Front. Strat. 1, 4, 13: “limen,Petr. 136.— 3. Templa liberata, freed from buildings that obstructed the view, i. e. having a free prospect, Cic. Leg. 2, 8, 21.

Pertubatio A. In gen., political disturbance, disorder, revolution: “quid est enim aliud tumultus nisi perturbatio tanta, ut major timor oriatur?Cic. Phil. 8, 1, 3:
B. Mental or personal disturbance, disquiet, perturbation: “motus atque perturbatio animorum atque rerum,Cic. Agr. 1, 8, 24: “vitae et magna confusio,id. N. D. 1, 2, 3: “rationis,id. Par. 3, 2, 26: “valetudinis,id. Fam. 9, 3, 9.—
C. In partic., an emotion, passion: quae Graeci pathē vocant, nobis perturbationes appellari magis placet, quam morbos,

1.28.15

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